Granulocyte

Granulocytes are a category of white blood cells characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm.[1] They are also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes or polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN, PML, or PMNL) because of the varying shapes of the nucleus, which is usually lobed into three segments. This distinguishes them from the mononuclear agranulocytes. In common parlance, the term polymorphonuclear leukocyte often refers specifically to "neutrophil granulocytes",[2] the most abundant of the granulocytes; the other types (eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells) have lower numbers. Granulocytes are produced via granulopoiesis in the bone marrow.

Granulocyte
PBEosinophil
An eosinophilic granulocyte.
Details
SystemImmune system
Identifiers
MeSHD006098
Anatomical terms of microanatomy

Types

There are four different types of granulocytes:[3]

Except for the mast cells, their names are derived from their staining characteristics; for example, the most abundant granulocyte is the neutrophil granulocyte, which has neutrally staining cytoplasmic granules.

Neutrophils

Neutrophil2
A neutrophil with a segmented nucleus (center and surrounded by erythrocytes), the intra-cellular granules are visible in the cytoplasm (Giemsa-stained high magnification)

Neutrophils are normally found in the bloodstream and are the most abundant type of phagocyte, constituting 60% to 65% of the total circulating white blood cells,[4] and consisting of two subpopulations: neutrophil-killers and neutrophil-cagers. One litre of human blood contains about five billion (5x109) neutrophils,[5] which are about 12–15 micrometers in diameter.[6] Once neutrophils have received the appropriate signals, it takes them about thirty minutes to leave the blood and reach the site of an infection.[7] Neutrophils do not return to the blood; they turn into pus cells and die.[7] Mature neutrophils are smaller than monocytes, and have a segmented nucleus with several sections(two to five segments); each section is connected by chromatin filaments. Neutrophils do not normally exit the bone marrow until maturity, but during an infection neutrophil precursors called myelocytes and promyelocytes are released.[8]

Neutrophils have three strategies for directly attacking micro-organisms: phagocytosis (ingestion), release of soluble anti-microbials (including granule proteins), and generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).[9] Neutrophils are professional phagocytes:[10] they are ferocious eaters and rapidly engulf invaders coated with antibodies and complement, as well as damaged cells or cellular debris. The intracellular granules of the human neutrophil have long been recognized for their protein-destroying and bactericidal properties.[11] Neutrophils can secrete products that stimulate monocytes and macrophages; these secretions increase phagocytosis and the formation of reactive oxygen compounds involved in intracellular killing.[12]

Neutrophils have two types of granules; primary (azurophilic) granules (found in young cells) and secondary (specific) granules (which are found in more mature cells). Primary granules contain cationic proteins and defensens that are used to kill bacteria, proteolytic enzymes and cathepsin G to break down (bacterial) proteins, lysozyme to break down bacterial cell walls, and myeloperoxidase (used to generate toxic bacteria-killing substances).[13] In addition, secretions from the primary granules of neutrophils stimulate the phagocytosis of IgG antibody-coated bacteria.[14] The secondary granules contain compounds that are involved in the formation of toxic oxygen compounds, lysozyme, and lactoferrin (used to take essential iron from bacteria).[13] Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) comprise a web of fibers composed of chromatin and serine proteases that trap and kill microbes extracellularly. Trapping of bacteria is a particularly important role for NETs in sepsis, where NET are formed within blood vessels.[15]

Eosinophils

Eosinophils also have kidney-shaped lobed nuclei (two to four lobes). The number of granules in an eosinophil can vary because they have a tendency to degranulate while in the blood stream.[16] Eosinophils play a crucial part in the killing of parasites (e.g., enteric nematodes) because their granules contain a unique, toxic basic protein and cationic protein (e.g., cathepsin[13]);[17] receptors that bind to IgE are used to help with this task.[18] These cells also have a limited ability to participate in phagocytosis,[19] they are professional antigen-presenting cells, they regulate other immune cell functions (e.g., CD4+ T cell, dendritic cell, B cell, mast cell, neutrophil, and basophil functions),[20] they are involved in the destruction of tumor cells,[16] and they promote the repair of damaged tissue.[21] A polypeptide called interleukin-5 interacts with eosinophils and causes them to grow and differentiate; this polypeptide is produced by basophils and by T-helper 2 cells (TH2).[17]

Basophils

PBBasophil
A basophil with lobed nuclei surrounded by erythrocytes

Basophils are one of the least abundant cells in bone marrow and blood (occurring at less than two percent of all cells). Like neutrophils and eosinophils, they have lobed nuclei; however, they have only two lobes, and the chromatin filaments that connect them are not very visible. Basophils have receptors that can bind to IgE, IgG, complement, and histamine. The cytoplasm of basophils contains a varied amount of granules; these granules are usually numerous enough to partially conceal the nucleus. Granule contents of basophils are abundant with histamine, heparin, chondroitin sulfate, peroxidase, platelet-activating factor, and other substances.

When an infection occurs, mature basophils will be released from the bone marrow and travel to the site of infection.[22] When basophils are injured, they will release histamine, which contributes to the inflammatory response that helps fight invading organisms. Histamine causes dilation and increased permeability of capillaries close to the basophil. Injured basophils and other leukocytes will release another substance called prostaglandins that contributes to an increased blood flow to the site of infection. Both of these mechanisms allow blood-clotting elements to be delivered to the infected area (this begins the recovery process and blocks the travel of microbes to other parts of the body). Increased permeability of the inflamed tissue also allows for more phagocyte migration to the site of infection so that they can consume microbes.[19]

Mast cells

Mast cells are a type of granulocyte that are present in tissues;[3] they mediate host defense against pathogens (e.g., parasites) and allergic reactions, particularly anaphylaxis.[3] Mast cells are also involved in mediating inflammation and autoimmunity as well as mediating and regulating neuroimmune system responses.[3][23][24]

Development

Granulocytes are derived from stem cells residing in the bone marrow. The differentiation of these stem cells from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell into granulocytes is termed granulopoiesis. Multiple intermediate cell types exist in this differentiation process, including myeloblasts and promyelocytes.

Function

Granule contents

Examples of toxic materials produced or released by degranulation by granulocytes on the ingestion of microorganisms are:

Clinical significance

Granulocytopenia is an abnormally low concentration of granulocytes in the blood. This condition reduces the body's resistance to many infections. Closely related terms include agranulocytosis (etymologically, "no granulocytes at all"; clinically, granulocyte levels less than 5% of normal) and neutropenia (deficiency of neutrophil granulocytes). Granulocytes live only one to two days in circulation (four days in spleen or other tissue), so transfusion of granulocytes as a therapeutic strategy would confer a very short-lasting benefit. In addition, there are many complications associated with such a procedure.

There is usually a granulocyte chemotactic defect in individuals suffering from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Additional images

Hematopoiesis (human) diagram en

Hematopoiesis

See also

References

  1. ^ WebMD (2009). "granulocyte". Webster's New World Medical Dictionary (3rd ed.). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 181. ISBN 978-0-544-18897-6.
  2. ^ WebMD (2009). "leukocyte, polymorphonuclear". Webster's New World Medical Dictionary (3rd ed.). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-544-18897-6.
  3. ^ a b c d Breedveld A, Groot Kormelink T, van Egmond M, de Jong EC (October 2017). "Granulocytes as modulators of dendritic cell function". J. Leukoc. Biol. 102 (4): 1003–1016. doi:10.1189/jlb.4MR0217-048RR. PMID 28642280.
  4. ^ Stvrtinová, Viera; Ján Jakubovský and Ivan Hulín (1995). "Neutrophils, central cells in acute inflammation". Inflammation and Fever from Pathophysiology: Principles of Disease. Computing Centre, Slovak Academy of Sciences: Academic Electronic Press. ISBN 80-967366-1-2. Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. Retrieved March 28, 2009.
  5. ^ Hoffbrand p. 331
  6. ^ Abbas, Chapter 12, 5th Edition
  7. ^ a b Sompayrac p. 18
  8. ^ Linderkamp, Otwin; Ruef, Peter; Brenner, Birgit; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian (1998). "Passive Deformability of Mature, Immature, and Active Neutrophils in Healthy and Septicemic Neonates". Pediatric Research. 44 (6): 946–50. doi:10.1203/00006450-199812000-00021. PMID 9853933.
  9. ^ Hickey, Michael J.; Kubes, Paul (2009). "Intravascular immunity: The host–pathogen encounter in blood vessels". Nature Reviews Immunology. 9 (5): 364–75. doi:10.1038/nri2532. PMID 19390567.
  10. ^ Robinson p. 187 and Ernst pp. 7–10
  11. ^ Paoletti p. 62
  12. ^ Soehnlein, O.; Kenne, E.; Rotzius, P.; Eriksson, E. E.; Lindbom, L. (2007). "Neutrophil secretion products regulate anti-bacterial activity in monocytes and macrophages". Clinical & Experimental Immunology. 151 (1): 139–45. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03532.x. PMC 2276935. PMID 17991288.
  13. ^ a b c Mayer, Gene (2006). "Immunology — Chapter One: Innate (non-specific) Immunity". Microbiology and Immunology On-Line Textbook. USC School of Medicine. Retrieved November 12, 2008.
  14. ^ Soehnlein, Oliver; Kai-Larsen, Ylva; Frithiof, Robert; Sorensen, Ole E.; Kenne, Ellinor; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Eriksson, Einar E.; Herwald, Heiko; Agerberth, Birgitta; Lindbom, Lennart (2008). "Neutrophil primary granule proteins HBP and HNP1–3 boost bacterial phagocytosis by human and murine macrophages". Journal of Clinical Investigation. 118 (10): 3491–502. doi:10.1172/JCI35740. PMC 2532980. PMID 18787642.
  15. ^ Clark, Stephen R; Ma, Adrienne C; Tavener, Samantha A; McDonald, Braedon; Goodarzi, Zahra; Kelly, Margaret M; Patel, Kamala D; Chakrabarti, Subhadeep; McAvoy, Erin; Sinclair, Gary D; Keys, Elizabeth M; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Devinney, Rebekah; Doig, Christopher J; Green, Francis H Y; Kubes, Paul (2007). "Platelet TLR4 activates neutrophil extracellular traps to ensnare bacteria in septic blood". Nature Medicine. 13 (4): 463–69. doi:10.1038/nm1565. PMID 17384648.
  16. ^ a b Hess, Charles E. "Segmented Eosinophil". University of Virginia Health System. Retrieved 2009-04-10.
  17. ^ a b Baron, Samuel (editor) (1996). Medical Microbiology (4th edition). EditionThe University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. ISBN 0-9631172-1-1.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  18. ^ Gleich, Gerald J.; Adolphson, Cheryl R. (1986). "The Eosinophilic Leukocyte: Structure and Function". Advances in Immunology Volume 39. Advances in Immunology. 39. pp. 177–253. doi:10.1016/S0065-2776(08)60351-X. ISBN 978-0-12-022439-5.
  19. ^ a b Campbell p. 903
  20. ^ Akuthota, P.; Wang, H. B.; Spencer, L. A.; Weller, P. F. (2008). "Immunoregulatory roles of eosinophils: A new look at a familiar cell". Clinical & Experimental Allergy. 38 (8): 1254–63. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2222.2008.03037.x. PMC 2735457. PMID 18727793.
  21. ^ Kariyawasam, Harsha; Robinson, Douglas (2006). "The Eosinophil: The Cell and Its Weapons, the Cytokines, Its Locations". Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 27 (2): 117–27. doi:10.1055/s-2006-939514. PMID 16612762.
  22. ^ Hess, Charles E. "Mature Basophil". University of Virginia Health System. Retrieved 2009-04-10.
  23. ^ Lee DM, Friend DS, Gurish MF, Benoist C, Mathis D, Brenner MB (September 2002). "Mast cells: a cellular link between autoantibodies and inflammatory arthritis". Science. 297 (5587): 1689–92. doi:10.1126/science.1073176. PMID 12215644.
  24. ^ Polyzoidis S, Koletsa T, Panagiotidou S, Ashkan K, Theoharides TC (2015). "Mast cells in meningiomas and brain inflammation". J Neuroinflammation. 12 (1): 170. doi:10.1186/s12974-015-0388-3. PMC 4573939. PMID 26377554. MCs originate from a bone marrow progenitor and subsequently develop different phenotype characteristics locally in tissues. Their range of functions is wide and includes participation in allergic reactions, innate and adaptive immunity, inflammation, and autoimmunity [34]. In the human brain, MCs can be located in various areas, such as the pituitary stalk, the pineal gland, the area postrema, the choroid plexus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and the median eminence [35]. In the meninges, they are found within the dural layer in association with vessels and terminals of meningeal nociceptors [36]. MCs have a distinct feature compared to other hematopoietic cells in that they reside in the brain [37]. MCs contain numerous granules and secrete an abundance of prestored mediators such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), neurotensin (NT), substance P (SP), tryptase, chymase, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), TNF, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and varieties of chemokines and cytokines some of which are known to disrupt the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) [38–40].

    They key role of MCs in inflammation [34] and in the disruption of the BBB [41–43] suggests areas of importance for novel therapy research. Increasing evidence also indicates that MCs participate in neuroinflammation directly [44–46] and through microglia stimulation [47], contributing to the pathogenesis of such conditions such as headaches, [48] autism [49], and chronic fatigue syndrome [50]. In fact, a recent review indicated that peripheral inflammatory stimuli can cause microglia activation [51], thus possibly involving MCs outside the brain.

Bibliography

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  • Delves, P.J., Martin, S. J., Burton, D. R. and Roit I.M. Roitt's Essential Immunology (11th edition), Blackwell Publishing, 2006, ISBN 978-1-4051-3603-7.
  • Ernst J. D. and Stendahl O., (editors), Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Bacterial Pathogenicity, Cambridge University Press, 2006, ISBN 0-521-84569-6. Website.
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External links

Agranulocytosis

Agranulocytosis, also known as agranulosis or granulopenia, is an acute condition involving a severe and dangerous leukopenia (lowered white blood cell count), most commonly of neutrophils, and thus causing a neutropenia in the circulating blood. It is a severe lack of one major class of infection-fighting white blood cells. People with this condition are at very high risk of serious infections due to their suppressed immune system.

In agranulocytosis, the concentration of granulocytes (a major class of white blood cells that includes neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) drops below 500 cells/mm³ of blood.

Basophil

Basophils are a type of white blood cells. Basophils are the least common of the granulocytes, representing about 0.5 to 1% of circulating white blood cells. However, they are the largest type of granulocyte. They are responsible for inflammatory reactions during immune response, as well as in the formation of acute and chronic allergic diseases, including anaphylaxis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and hay fever. They produce histamine and serotonin that induce inflammation, and heparin that prevents blood clotting, although there are less than that found in mast cell granules. It used to be thought that basophils that have migrated from blood into their resident tissues (connective tissue) are known as mast cells, but this is no longer thought to be the case.Basophils were discovered in 1879 by German physician Paul Ehrlich, who one year earlier had found a cell type present in tissues that he termed mastzellen (now mast cells). Ehrlich received the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries.

The name comes from the fact that these leukocytes are basophilic, i.e., they are susceptible to staining by basic dyes, as shown in the picture.

CFU-GM

CFU-GM (or "GMP", for "granulocyte-macrophage progenitor") is a colony forming unit. It is derived from CFU-GEMM.

The "GM" stands for "granulocyte, monocyte".It is the precursor for monoblasts and myeloblasts.

Production is stimulated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

CXCL6

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 6 (CXCL6) is a small cytokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family that is also known as granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2). As its former name suggests, CXCL6 is a chemoattractant for neutrophilic granulocytes. It elicits its chemotactic effects by interacting with the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. The gene for CXCL6 is located on human chromosome 4 in a cluster with other CXC chemokine genes.

Eosinophil

Eosinophils, sometimes called eosinophiles or, less commonly, acidophils, are a variety of white blood cells and one of the immune system components responsible for combating multicellular parasites and certain infections in vertebrates. Along with mast cells and basophils, they also control mechanisms associated with allergy and asthma. They are granulocytes that develop during hematopoiesis in the bone marrow before migrating into blood, after which they are terminally differentiated and do not multiply.These cells are eosinophilic or "acid-loving" due to their large acidophilic cytoplasmic granules, which show their affinity for acids by their affinity to coal tar dyes: Normally transparent, it is this affinity that causes them to appear brick-red after staining with eosin, a red dye, using the Romanowsky method. The staining is concentrated in small granules within the cellular cytoplasm, which contain many chemical mediators, such as eosinophil peroxidase, ribonuclease (RNase), deoxyribonucleases (DNase), lipase, plasminogen, and major basic protein. These mediators are released by a process called degranulation following activation of the eosinophil, and are toxic to both parasite and host tissues.

In normal individuals, eosinophils make up about 1–3% of white blood cells, and are about 12–17 micrometres in size with bilobed nuclei. While they are released into the bloodstream as neutrophils are, eosinophils reside in tissue. They are found in the medulla and the junction between the cortex and medulla of the thymus, and, in the lower gastrointestinal tract, ovaryes, uterus, spleen, and lymph nodes, but not in the lungs, skin, esophagus, or some other internal organs under normal conditions. The presence of eosinophils in these latter organs is associated with disease. For instance, patients with eosinophilic asthma have high levels of eosinophils that lead to inflammation and tissue damage, making it more difficult for patients to breathe. Eosinophils persist in the circulation for 8–12 hours, and can survive in tissue for an additional 8–12 days in the absence of stimulation. Pioneering work in the 1980s elucidated that eosinophils were unique granulocytes, having the capacity to survive for extended periods of time after their maturation as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture experiments.

Filgrastim

Filgrastim, sold under the brand name Neupogen among others, is a medication used to treat low blood neutrophils. Low neutrophils may occur with HIV/AIDS, following chemotherapy or radiation poisoning, or be of an unknown cause. It may also be used to increase white blood cells for gathering during leukapheresis. It is given either by injection into a vein or under the skin.Common side effects include fever, cough, chest pain, joint pain, vomiting, and hair loss. Severe side effects include splenic rupture and allergic reactions. It is unclear if use in pregnancy is safe for the baby. Filgrastim is a recombinant-DNA form of the naturally occurring granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). It works by stimulating the body to increase neutrophil production.Filgrastim was approved for medical use in the United States in 1991. It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system. The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$3.95 to US$94.66 per dose. In the United Kingdom it cost the NIH about £50.15 per 300 ug dose. In the United States treatment costs more than US$200. Filgrastim biosimilar medication are also available.

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), also known as colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), is a monomeric glycoprotein secreted by macrophages, T cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts that functions as a cytokine. The pharmaceutical analogs of naturally occurring GM-CSF are called sargramostim and molgramostim.

Unlike granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which specifically promotes neutrophil proliferation and maturation, GM-CSF affects more cell types, especially macrophages and eosinophils.

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor

The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor also known as CD116 (Cluster of Differentiation 116), is a receptor for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which stimulates the production of white blood cells. The receptor is normally located on myeloblast, mature neutrophil, but not on any erythroid or megakaryocytic lineage cells.It is associated with Surfactant metabolism dysfunction type 4.

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF or GCSF), also known as colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF 3), is a glycoprotein that stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and release them into the bloodstream.Functionally, it is a cytokine and hormone, a type of colony-stimulating factor, and is produced by a number of different tissues. The pharmaceutical analogs of naturally occurring G-CSF are called filgrastim and lenograstim.

G-CSF also stimulates the survival, proliferation, differentiation, and function of neutrophil precursors and mature neutrophils.

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor

The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R) also known as CD114 (Cluster of Differentiation 114) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CSF3R gene. G-CSF-R is a cell-surface receptor for the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The G-CSF receptors belongs to a family of cytokine receptors known as the hematopoietin receptor family. The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor is present on precursor cells in the bone marrow, and, in response to stimulation by G-CSF, initiates cell proliferation and differentiation into mature neutrophilic granulocytes and macrophages.

The G-CSF-R is a transmembrane receptor that consists of an extracellular ligand-binding portion, a transmembrane domain, and the cytoplasmic portion that is responsible for signal transduction. GCSF-R ligand-binding is associated with dimerization of the receptor and signal transduction through proteins including Jak, Lyn, STAT, and Erk1/2.

Granulocytosis

In medicine, granulocytosis is the presence in peripheral blood of an increased number of granulocytes, a category of white blood cells. Often, the word refers to an increased neutrophil granulocyte count (neutrophilia), as neutrophils are the main granulocytes.

Hypereosinophilic syndrome

The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a disease characterized by a persistently elevated eosinophil count (≥ 1500 eosinophils/mm³) in the blood for at least six months without any recognizable cause, with involvement of either the heart, nervous system, or bone marrow.HES is a diagnosis of exclusion, after clonal eosinophilia (such as FIP1L1-PDGFRA-fusion induced hypereosinophelia and leukemia) and reactive eosinophilia (in response to infection, autoimmune disease, atopy, hypoadrenalism, tropical eosinophilia, or cancer) have been ruled out.There are some associations with chronic eosinophilic leukemia as it shows similar characteristics and genetic defects.If left untreated, HES is progressive and fatal. It is treated with glucocorticoids such as prednisone. The addition of the monoclonal antibody mepolizumab may reduce the dose of glucocorticoids.

Immunodeficiency

Immunodeficiency is a state in which the immune system's ability to fight infectious disease and cancer is compromised or entirely absent. Most cases of immunodeficiency are acquired ("secondary") due to extrinsic factors that affect the patient's immune system. Examples of these extrinsic factors include HIV infection, extremes of age, and environmental factors, such as nutrition. In the clinical setting, the immunosuppression by some drugs, such as steroids, can be either an adverse effect or the intended purpose of the treatment. Examples of such use is in organ transplant surgery as an anti-rejection measure and in patients suffering from an overactive immune system, as in autoimmune diseases. Some people are born with intrinsic defects in their immune system, or primary immunodeficiency. A person who has an immunodeficiency of any kind is said to be immunocompromised. An immunocompromised person may be particularly vulnerable to opportunistic infections, in addition to normal infections that could affect everyone. Immunodeficiency also decreases cancer immunosurveillance, in which the immune system scans the body's cells and kills neoplastic ones.

Lymphokine

Lymphokines are a subset of cytokines that are produced by a type of immune cell known as a lymphocyte. They are protein mediators typically produced by T cells to direct the immune system response by signaling between its cells. Lymphokines have many roles, including the attraction of other immune cells, including macrophages and other lymphocytes, to an infected site and their subsequent activation to prepare them to mount an immune response. Circulating lymphocytes can detect a very small concentration of lymphokine and then move up the concentration gradient towards where the immune response is required. Lymphokines aid B cells to produce antibodies.

Important lymphokines secreted by the T helper cell include:

Interleukin 2

Interleukin 3

Interleukin 4

Interleukin 5

Interleukin 6

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

Interferon-gamma

Myeloblast

The myeloblast is a unipotent stem cell, which will differentiate into one of the effectors of the granulocyte series. The stimulation by G-CSF and other cytokines triggers maturation, differentiation, proliferation and cell survival. It is found in the bone marrow.

Namilumab

Namilumab (alternative identifier MT203) is a human monoclonal antibody (class IgG1 kappa) that targets granulocyte macrophage-colon stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2) and is currently being researched for application in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis. Clinical trials investigating the therapeutic utility of Namilumab have include phase I and phase II clinical trials to establish the safety, tolerability and preliminary therapeutic utility of the antibody in plaque psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.Namilumab was produced by Micromet Inc and is under development by Takeda Pharmaceuticals International.

Neutropenia

Neutropenia is an abnormally low concentration of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the blood. Neutrophils make up the majority of circulating white blood cells and serve as the primary defense against infections by destroying bacteria, bacterial fragments and immunoglobulin-bound viruses in the blood. People with neutropenia are more susceptible to bacterial infections and, without prompt medical attention, the condition may become life-threatening (neutropenic sepsis).Neutropenia can be divided into congenital and acquired, with severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and cyclic neutropenia being autosomal dominant and mostly caused by heterzygous mutations in the ELANE gene (neutrophil elastase). Neutropenia can be acute (temporary) or chronic (long lasting). The term is sometimes used interchangeably with "leukopenia" ("deficit in the number of white blood cells").

Neutrophil

Neutrophils (also known as neutrocytes) are the most abundant type of granulocytes and the most abundant (60% to 70%) type of white blood cells in most mammals. They form an essential part of the innate immune system. Their functions vary in different animals.They are formed from stem cells in the bone marrow and differentiated into subpopulations of neutrophil-killers and neutrophil-cagers. They are short-lived and highly motile, or mobile, as they can enter parts of tissue where other cells/molecules cannot. Neutrophils may be subdivided into segmented neutrophils and banded neutrophils (or bands). They form part of the polymorphonuclear cells family (PMNs) together with basophils and eosinophils.The name neutrophil derives from staining characteristics on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histological or cytological preparations. Whereas basophilic white blood cells stain dark blue and eosinophilic white blood cells stain bright red, neutrophils stain a neutral pink. Normally, neutrophils contain a nucleus divided into 2–5 lobes.

Neutrophils are a type of phagocyte and are normally found in the bloodstream. During the beginning (acute) phase of inflammation, particularly as a result of bacterial infection, environmental exposure, and some cancers, neutrophils are one of the first-responders of inflammatory cells to migrate towards the site of inflammation. They migrate through the blood vessels, then through interstitial tissue, following chemical signals such as Interleukin-8 (IL-8), C5a, fMLP, Leukotriene B4 and H2O2 in a process called chemotaxis. They are the predominant cells in pus, accounting for its whitish/yellowish appearance.Neutrophils are recruited to the site of injury within minutes following trauma and are the hallmark of acute inflammation; however, due to some pathogens being indigestible, they can be unable to resolve certain infections without the assistance of other types of immune cells.

Neutrophilia

Neutrophilia (also called neutrophil leukocytosis or occasionally neutrocytosis) is leukocytosis of neutrophils, that is, a high number of neutrophils in the blood. Because neutrophils are the main type of granulocytes, mentions of granulocytosis often overlap in meaning with neutrophilia.

The opposite of neutrophilia is neutropenia.

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