Grant Hill

Grant Henry Hill (born October 5, 1972) is a retired American professional basketball player and current Hudl videographer for Orlando City SC. He is currently a host of NBA TV's NBA Inside Stuff. Hill played for four teams in his professional career in the National Basketball Association (NBA); the Detroit Pistons, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, and Los Angeles Clippers.

Hill's parents are retired NFL Pro Bowl running back Calvin Hill and Janet Hill. He and his father were Rookies of the Year in their respective sports; Hill in the NBA in 1995 (shared with Jason Kidd), and his father in the NFL with the Dallas Cowboys in 1969.

While playing college basketball at Duke, he was the 1994 ACC Player of the Year, a two-time NCAA All-American, and a two-time NCAA champion. As a professional he was the 1995 NBA co-Rookie of the Year, and was a seven-time NBA All-Star, five-time All-NBA selection, and three-time winner of the NBA Sportsmanship Award. He is also a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

Throughout his college career and early in his years with the Detroit Pistons, Hill was widely considered to be one of the best all-around players in the game, often leading his team in points, rebounds and assists. Touted as one of the best players in Duke history, many went as far as to say that he was one of the greatest collegiate basketball players in his era.[1] After his first six seasons with the Pistons, in which he averaged 21.6 points, 7.9 rebounds, and 6.3 assists, his next twelve seasons were mostly injury plagued, as he averaged just 13.1 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 2.6 assists per game. On June 1, 2013, after 19 years in the league, Hill announced his retirement from the NBA.[2] Hill and Tony Ressler officially purchased the Atlanta Hawks on June 24, 2015 for an estimated $730 million[3]–850 million.[4][5]

Grant Hill
Grant Hill 2007-12-08
Hill with the Suns in 2007
Atlanta Hawks
PositionVice Chair of the Board
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornOctober 5, 1972 (age 46)
Dallas, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High schoolSouth Lakes
(Reston, Virginia)
CollegeDuke (1990–1994)
NBA draft1994 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
Selected by the Detroit Pistons
Playing career1994–2013
PositionSmall forward
Number33
Career history
19942000Detroit Pistons
20002007Orlando Magic
20072012Phoenix Suns
2012–2013Los Angeles Clippers
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points17,137 (16.7 ppg)
Rebounds6,169 (6.0 rpg)
Assists4,252 (4.1 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Basketball Hall of Fame as player
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2014

College

When the time came to choose a college, Hill's mother told the Fox Sports documentary Beyond the Glory, that she wanted him to attend Georgetown, while his father preferred the University of North Carolina. Hill decided to attend Duke University, playing four years with the Blue Devils, winning national titles in 1991 and 1992. Duke became the first Division I program to win consecutive titles since UCLA in 1973. Despite losing two of the biggest contributors on the Blue Devils, Christian Laettner (in 1992) and Bobby Hurley (who both went on to play in the NBA with Hill and Laettner later becoming teammates on the Detroit Pistons), Hill led Duke to the championship game once again in 1994, but lost to Arkansas Razorbacks. Hill won the Henry Iba Corinthian Award as the nation's top defensive player in 1993, and in 1994 he was the ACC Player of the Year. During his collegiate career, Hill became the first player in ACC history to collect more than 1,900 points, 700 rebounds, 400 assists, 200 steals and 100 blocked shots. As a result of his successful college career, he became the eighth player in Duke history to have his jersey number (33) retired. After his freshman season at Duke, Hill played on the bronze medal-winning U.S. team at the 1991 Pan American Games, held in Havana, Cuba.

Hill also is widely known for his role in a desperation play in an NCAA tournament regional final against Kentucky in 1992, which is considered by many to be one of the greatest college basketball games of all time. With Duke down 103–102 in overtime and 2.1 seconds remaining after Kentucky's Sean Woods hit a floater, an unguarded Hill heaved the in-bounds pass 75 feet across the court into the hands of Laettner, who dribbled once and spun before pulling up to make the game-winning jumper from just outside the free-throw line as time expired.

NBA career and Team USA (1994–2013)

Detroit Pistons (1994–2000)

Grant Hill was drafted by the Detroit Pistons with the third pick in the NBA draft after graduating from Duke in 1994. In his first season, he averaged 19.9 points, 6.4 rebounds, 5.0 assists and 1.77 steals per game, and became the first Pistons rookie since Isiah Thomas in 1981–82 to score 1000 points. Hill ended up sharing NBA Rookie of the Year Award honors with Jason Kidd of the Dallas Mavericks, becoming the first Piston since Dave Bing in 1966–67 to win the award. Hill also won the Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award. He was named to the all-NBA First Team in 1997, and all-NBA Second Teams in 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Hill also regularly played in the NBA All-Star Game, where he made history by being the first rookie to lead an NBA All-Star fan balloting in (1994–95) with 1,289,585 votes,[6] narrowly defeating Shaquille O'Neal. In addition, he became the first rookie in any of the four major professional sports leagues to lead all-star fan voting.

In his second season (1995–96), he once again led the All-Star fan balloting, this time edging Michael Jordan (Jordan's first All-Star game after returning since retiring in 1993). During the 1995–96 season, Hill showcased his all-round abilities by leading the NBA in triple-doubles (10). He also won a gold medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta as a member of the U.S. men's basketball team, where he had the team's fifth highest scoring average (9.7) and led the team in steals (18). In 1996–97 season, Hill averaged 21.4 points, 9.0 rebounds, 7.3 assists and 1.8 steals per game. He became the first player since Larry Bird in 1989–90 to average 20 points, 9 rebounds and 7 assists in a season, an accomplishment that had not been duplicated until Russell Westbrook averaged a triple-double in the 2016-17 NBA season. Once again, Hill led the league in triple-doubles, where his 13 triple-doubles represented 35 percent of the league's triple-double total that season. He was the league's Player of the Month for January and was also awarded NBA's IBM Award, given to the player with the biggest statistical contributions to his team. He finished third in MVP voting, behind Karl Malone and Michael Jordan.

Much like Scottie Pippen with the Bulls, Hill assumed the role of a "point forward" in Detroit, running the Pistons' offense. As a result, between the 1995–96 and 1998–99 NBA seasons, Hill was the league leader in assists per game among non-guards all four seasons. In the lockout-shortened 1999 season, as he led his team in points, rebounds and assists for the third time, Hill joined Wilt Chamberlain and Elgin Baylor as the only players in NBA history to lead their teams in scoring, rebounding and assists more than once. Hill and Chamberlain are the only two players in league history to lead their teams in points, rebounds and assists per game three times. Hill was selected to play in the 1998 FIBA World Championship, but in the end no NBA players played in this tournament due to the lockout.

In 1999–2000 season, Hill averaged 25.8 points while shooting 49% from the field, the season's third highest scoring average, behind MVP Shaquille O'Neal and Allen Iverson. He averaged 6.6 rebounds and 5.2 assists per game. However, despite Hill's individual accomplishments in Detroit, the Pistons never made it far in the playoffs, either losing in the first round (1996, 1997 and 1999), or missing the playoffs entirely in the 1994–95 and 1997–98 seasons. The 2000 playoffs would be no different. On April 15, 2000, 7 days before the start of the playoffs, Hill sprained his left ankle in a game against the Philadelphia 76ers. He continued to play until the first round playoff series against the Miami Heat, in which his injured ankle got worse and Hill was forced to leave halfway through game 2. Eventually, the Heat swept the Pistons 3–0. Hill was initially selected for the 2000 Olympics U.S. team, but could not play due to ankle injury, which would prove to be a major liability for many years to come.

After the first six seasons of his career, before ankle injury, Hill had a total of 9,393 points, 3,417 rebounds and 2,720 assists. Oscar Robertson, Bird, and LeBron James are the only three players in league history to eclipse these numbers after their first six seasons.

Orlando Magic (2000–2007)

As an unrestricted free agent, Hill had planned to sign with the Orlando Magic. On August 3, 2000, however, a sign-and-trade deal allowed Hill to receive a slightly more lucrative contract while Detroit received at least some compensation for losing him. The Pistons signed Hill to a seven-year, $92.8 million contract and traded him to Orlando for Chucky Atkins and Ben Wallace.[7] The Magic hoped he would team up with budding superstar Tracy McGrady, who had been signed away from the Toronto Raptors at that time, to return Orlando among the NBA elite. But Hill was hampered by ankle injuries, playing in only four games in his first season with the Magic, 14 games in his second and 29 in his third. He was forced to sit out his entire fourth year with Orlando (2003–04). Meanwhile, the Pistons, who had defeated the Magic in the 2003 Playoffs, but ended up losing to the New Jersey Nets in the Eastern Conference Finals, won the championship the following year in 2004.

In March 2003, Hill underwent a major surgical procedure in which doctors re-fractured his ankle and realigned it with his leg bone. Five days after the surgery was performed, Hill developed a 104.5 °F (40.3 °C) fever and convulsions, and was rushed to a hospital. Doctors removed the splint around his ankle and discovered that Hill had contracted a potentially fatal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. He was hospitalized for a week and had to take intravenous antibiotics for six months.

In the 2004–05 season Hill, though hampered by a bruised left shin that caused him to miss several games, started and played 67 games for the Magic. He was named the Eastern Conference player of the week for the week between November 15–21, 2004. Over the season, Hill averaged 19.7 points per game on a .509 field goal percentage. Fans voted him an All-Star starter again, and he led the Eastern Conference All-Star Team to a victory over the West. In addition, at the conclusion of the season, Hill was awarded the Joe Dumars Trophy presented to the NBA Sportsmanship Award Winner.

During the 2005–06 season Hill was once again injured frequently as nagging groin injuries kept him sidelined for much of the first half of the season, limiting him to 21 games. He got a sports hernia that was caused by an uneven pressure on Hill's feet while he was running, due to concerns that he could re-aggravate the injury on his left ankle if it got too much pressure. Hill underwent surgery for the hernia and stated that he would consider retirement if he had to get another surgery.

In the 2006–07 season Hill returned from injuries despite numerous rumors surrounding his retirement. Hill received ankle rotation therapy from specialists in Vancouver, British Columbia during the off-season and stated that he had regained much motion in his left ankle. Hill returned to the Magic lineup, starting at the shooting guard position. Despite having problems with injuries to his left knee and a tendon in his left ankle, Hill managed to play 65 games, two short of the highest number of games he played over a single season as a member of the Magic. He finished the season with averages of 14.4 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game. This season would see Hill return to the playoffs for the first time since 2000, his first playoff appearance with the Magic. The 8th seed Magic would meet Hill's old team, the Detroit Pistons, in the first round. The Pistons' vast playoff experience would prevail over the inexperienced Magic, who had not seen significant post-season action for some years, and despite having some close games, the series would end with a 4–0 Pistons sweep, leaving Hill undecided on whether to return for the 2007–08 season with the Magic, sign with another team, or retire.[8]

Phoenix Suns (2007–2012)

Grant Hill Phoenix
Hill with the Phoenix Suns in 2009

Hill became an unrestricted free agent on July 1, 2007. On July 5 Hill's agent, Lon Babby, said Hill intended to sign with the Phoenix Suns on July 11 (the first day free agents can officially sign contracts).[9] Hill earned $1.83 million for 2007–08 with a $1.97 million player option for the next year. Hill was named captain along with Steve Nash. Hill was given permission by Suns Ring of Honor member, Alvan Adams, to wear his familiar No. 33 with the Suns. Hill adapted well to the Suns' up-tempo style, averaging double figures in points as a key role player for Phoenix in the early months of the 2007–08 season. He played in the team's first 34 games before an emergency appendectomy on January 9, 2008, sidelined him for two weeks. Despite being bothered by multiple injuries throughout the season, Hill had his first 70-game season since leaving Detroit, averaging 13.1 ppg, 5.0 rpg and 2.9 apg in the process.

Playing for the Phoenix Suns in the 2008–2009 season, Hill appeared in all 82 games for the first time in his career and averaged 12.0 ppg, 4.90 rpg, and 2.3 apg, scoring 27 points and 10 rebounds in the Suns' season finale.

On July 10, 2009, the Associated Press reported that Hill decided to re-sign with the Phoenix Suns for a 2-year deal, despite an offer from the New York Knicks for the full mid-level exception and the Boston Celtics offering Hill the bi-annual exception.[10] The first year of the contract is believed to be worth around $3 million with the second year at Hill's option.

In 2010 the Phoenix Suns advanced to the Western Conference Semifinals, marking Hill's first playoff series victory, and making him the first NBA player in history to win his first playoff series after 15 years in the league. After sweeping the San Antonio Spurs 4–0, the Suns then moved to the Western Conference Finals to face the Los Angeles Lakers, but lost in six games (4-2).

In 2010, he was chosen as the tenth-smartest athlete in sports by Sporting News.[11][12] [12]

On June 8 Hill exercised his option for the 2010–11 season.[13] The Suns underwent two major roster changes in 2010–11. During the pre-season teammate Amar'e Stoudemire left for New York while Hedo Türkoğlu, Josh Childress and Hakim Warrick joined the Suns; within a year they also were traded for three other players. Hill became one of seven all-time NBA players to average 13 or more points at 38 years of age or older. On January 15, 2011, Hill passed the 16,000 career points milestone in a win over the Portland Trail Blazers.

On December 9, 2011, Hill decided to stay with the Phoenix Suns for one year, accepting a $6.5 million contract.[14] By the end of the 2011–12 season, Hill had reached 17,000 career points, ending the season 78th on the all-time NBA scoring list (82nd NBA/ABA), 79th in career assists (83rd), and 66th in career steals (71st).

Los Angeles Clippers (2012–2013)

After his contract with the Suns expired, Hill was pursued by multiple contenders, including the Los Angeles Lakers, Miami Heat, New York Knicks, Portland Trail Blazers, and the Oklahoma City Thunder. On July 18, 2012, Hill signed a contract with the Clippers.[15] Hill suffered a bruised bone in his right knee in the preseason which kept him out for three months. He then made his debut with the Clippers on January 12, 2013 against the Orlando Magic. During the 2012–13 season, he played only 29 games, averaging 3.2 ppg and 1.7 rpg in 15.1 mpg. The Clippers finished 56-26, fourth best in the Western Conference, and won the Pacific Division for the first time in franchise history. However, the Clippers fell to the Memphis Grizzlies in a six-game series in the first round.

Retirement (2013)

On June 1, 2013, Hill announced his retirement from professional basketball after 19 seasons in the NBA.[16] Hill would later join NBA TV to become an analyst.

Post-NBA career

On June 24, 2015, a deal was approved by the NBA Board of Governors to sell the Atlanta Hawks franchise to a group led by Tony Ressler, which included Hill, for $850 million.[17] On March 31, 2018, Hill would be named as a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

Sponsorships and paid endorsements

  • In the 1990s, one of the soft drink Sprite's longest-running advertising campaigns was "Grant Hill Drinks Sprite" (overlapping its "Obey Your Thirst" campaign), in which Hill's abilities, and Sprite's importance in giving him his abilities, were humorously exaggerated.[18][19]
  • Hill was a spokesperson for McDonald's restaurant, watchmaker TAG Heuer and sportswear companies Fila, and later Adidas and Nike.
  • As of 2014, Hill has also appeared in ads for AT&T along with his wife Tamia.[20]

In television and film

Personal life

In Detroit, Michigan, he was introduced to Canadian singer Tamia by Anita Baker. Hill and Tamia married on July 24, 1999. Their daughter, Myla Grace Hill, was born on January 23, 2002. On August 9, 2007, Tamia gave birth to their second daughter, Lael Rose Hill.

In 2003, Hill contracted a life-threatening methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, from which it took him six months to recover.[28] He has since become an advocate for the awareness and prevention of MRSA and has appeared in public service announcements for Stop MRSA Now!, a non-profit organization.[29]

Grant Hill earned his bachelor's degree from Duke University with a double major in history and political science.[30]

Charitable activities

  • Hill had been a Vice-Chairman for the Board of Directors of the Special Olympic World Summer Games in 1999 which were held in Durham, Raleigh and Chapel Hill, North Carolina.[31]
  • Grant Hill, his mother Janet Hill and grandmother Vivian McDonald established a scholarship at the Dillard University in New Orleans. This scholarship is in memory of Hill's grandfather, who supported this University consistently.[31]
  • Hill was featured on a poster "READ" that supported libraries, literacy, and advocated reading.[31]
  • Hill contributed to the day care center established by his father, Calvin Hill, in New Haven, Connecticut in 1972, by donating funds. This day care center was established after Calvin graduated from Yale University and the goal was helping children and families in the local community.[31]
  • Hill funded an organization in his hometown of Reston, Virginia, that helps needy students of any age pursue education.[31]

Other interests

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1994–95 Detroit 70 69 38.3 .477 .148 .732 6.4 5.0 1.8 .9 19.9
1995–96 Detroit 80 80 40.8 .462 .192 .751 9.8 6.9 1.3 .6 20.2
1996–97 Detroit 80 80 39.3 .496 .303 .711 9.0 7.3 1.8 .6 21.4
1997–98 Detroit 81 81 40.7 .452 .143 .740 7.7 6.8 1.8 .7 21.1
1998–99 Detroit 50 50 37.0 .479 .000 .752 7.1 6.0 1.6 .5 21.1
1999–00 Detroit 74 74 37.5 .489 .347 .795 6.6 5.2 1.4 .6 25.8
2000–01 Orlando 4 4 33.3 .442 1.000 .615 6.3 6.3 1.3 .5 13.8
2001–02 Orlando 14 14 36.6 .426 .000 .863 8.9 4.6 .6 .3 16.8
2002–03 Orlando 29 29 29.1 .492 .250 .819 7.1 4.2 1.0 .4 14.5
2004–05 Orlando 67 67 34.9 .509 .231 .821 4.7 3.3 1.4 .4 19.7
2005–06 Orlando 21 17 29.2 .490 .250 .765 3.8 2.3 1.1 .3 15.1
2006–07 Orlando 65 64 30.9 .518 .167 .765 3.6 2.1 .9 .4 14.4
2007–08 Phoenix 70 68 31.7 .503 .317 .867 5.0 2.9 .9 .8 13.1
2008–09 Phoenix 82 68 29.8 .523 .316 .808 4.9 2.3 1.1 .7 12.0
2009–10 Phoenix 81 81 30.0 .478 .438 .817 5.5 2.4 .7 .4 11.3
2010–11 Phoenix 80 80 30.1 .484 .395 .829 4.2 2.5 .8 .4 13.2
2011–12 Phoenix 49 46 28.1 .446 .264 .761 3.5 2.2 .8 .6 10.2
2012–13 L.A. Clippers 29 0 15.1 .388 .273 .583 1.7 .9 .4 .2 3.2
Career 1026 972 33.9 .483 .314 .769 6.0 4.1 1.2 .6 16.7
All-Star 6 6 22.2 .571 .500 .545 2.5 3.2 1.2 .2 10.5

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1996 Detroit 3 3 38.3 .564 .500 .857 7.3 3.7 1.0 .0 19.0
1997 Detroit 5 5 40.6 .437 .000 .718 6.8 5.4 .8 1.0 23.6
1999 Detroit 5 5 35.2 .457 .000 .813 7.2 7.4 2.0 .4 19.4
2000 Detroit 2 2 27.5 .375 .500 .900 5.5 4.5 .5 .0 11.0
2007 Orlando 4 4 35.8 .500 .000 .667 5.5 3.8 .5 .3 15.0
2008 Phoenix 3 2 22.7 .455 .000 1.000 5.3 1.0 .7 .3 3.7
2010 Phoenix 16 16 28.3 .480 .188 .868 5.8 2.3 .8 .6 9.6
2013 L.A. Clippers 1 0 20.0 .500 .000 .000 4.0 2.0 .0 .0 4.0
Career 39 37 31.6 .469 .238 .781 6.1 3.6 .9 .5 13.4

See also

References

  1. ^ Brodess, Doug (October 24, 2011). "Duke Basketball: Top 10 Blue Devils of All Time". Bleacher Report. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  2. ^ "Grant Hill retires from NBA after 19 seasons".
  3. ^ Bloomberg: "NBA Governors Approve $730 Million Hawks Sale to Ressler’s Group" By Scott Soshnick and Zeke Faux June 24, 2015
  4. ^ "Atlanta Hawks Sold to Ares' Ressler for $850 million, Group Includes Sara Blakely and Grant Hill". Atlanta Business Chronicle. April 24, 2015. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
  5. ^ Atlanta Hawks Selling for $850 Million. The Wall Street Journal. Ben Cohen. April 22, 2015. accessed February 9, 2016
  6. ^ "Hill's record 1,289,585 votes will go down in all-star history. (Originated from Knight-Ridder Newspapers)". Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service. January 26, 1995.
  7. ^ "Magic's Strength No Illusion". CBS News. August 3, 2000. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  8. ^ Beset by injuries in career, Hill considers retirement, updated April 28, 2007
  9. ^ Hill to sign with Phoenix after agreeing to two-year deal July 5, 2007
  10. ^ Aldridge, David. "Loyalty to Suns keeps Hill in Phoenix" Archived July 14, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, NBA.com, July 10, 2009.
  11. ^ "SN names the 20 smartest athletes in sports". Sporting News. September 27, 2010. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013.
  12. ^ a b "SN names the 20 smartest athletes in sports – MLB". Sporting News. September 23, 2010. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013. Retrieved June 3, 2013.
  13. ^ Schwartz, Michael (June 8, 2010). "Grant Hill swiftly exercises option, sends message about keeping team together". valleyofthesuns.com.
  14. ^ Grant Hill staying with Phoenix Suns
  15. ^ "CLIPPERS SIGN SEVEN-TIME ALL-STAR GRANT HILL". NBA.com. July 18, 2012. Retrieved July 18, 2012.
  16. ^ "Grant Hill retires from NBA basketball :InsideHoops". www.insidehoops.com.
  17. ^ Cornish, Stephanie (April 25, 2015). "Grant Hill Among New Owners of Atlanta Hawks - Afro".
  18. ^ metacafe.com. "Video is temporarily not available". Metacafe.
  19. ^ A Better Basketball Player? Archived October 13, 2007, at the Wayback Machine, AdvertisementAve.com
  20. ^ "Tamia & Grant Hill in New AT&T Commercial". Chris Smith Management / 21 Entertainment Group. Archived from the original on May 22, 2014. Retrieved May 21, 2014.
  21. ^ "The Fab Five: Hating Duke". ESPN. March 10, 2011. Archived from the original on March 16, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2011.
  22. ^ Reid, Jason (March 13, 2011). "Jalen Rose's comments on race in ESPN documentary are misguided". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  23. ^ Hill, Grant (March 16, 2011). "Grant Hill's Response to Jalen Rose". The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  24. ^ Everson, Darren (March 16, 2011). "Fab Five Member Responds to Hill". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved March 18, 2011.
  25. ^ "Hill Takes Issue In Fab Five Flap". MSNBC. March 16, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  26. ^ "Hill Takes Issue In Fab Five Flap". Forbes. March 16, 2011. Archived from the original on April 6, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  27. ^ Chip Patterson (February 3, 2015). "2015 Final Four: Bill Raftery, Grant Hill picked as game analysts". CBS Sports. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  28. ^ Grant Hill at Stop MRSA Now!
  29. ^ "Stop MRSA Now!". www.stopmrsanow.org.
  30. ^ Eilerson, Nick (June 28, 2013). "Grant Hill pursues life beyond basketball Former South Lakes High star reflects back on roots in Reston". Fairfax Times. Archived from the original on July 1, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e Giving Back to the Community at Hill's official website

External links

1991–92 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1991–92 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team was a Division I college basketball team that competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Led by All-American Christian Laettner and Grant Hill, Duke won its 2nd national championship in as many years to become the first repeating team since UCLA's seven-year dynasty from 1967 to 1973. The feat would not be accomplished again in college basketball until the Florida Gators did it in 2007.

1993 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1993 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1994 NBA draft

The 1994 NBA draft took place on June 29, 1994, in Indianapolis. Two NBA rookies of the year were picked in the first round, as Jason Kidd and Grant Hill were co-winners of the award for the 1994–95 NBA season. Kidd and Hill would end up as perennial All-Stars (10 and 7-time selections, respectively), though Hill's career was marred by severe injuries.

The first overall pick Glenn Robinson was involved in a contract holdout shortly after being selected, reportedly seeking a 13-year, $100 million contract. Both Robinson and the Milwaukee Bucks eventually agreed on a 10-year, $68 million contract, which once stood as the richest NBA contract ever signed by a rookie. A fixed salary cap for rookies was implemented by the NBA the following season. Robinson himself had a productive NBA career, becoming a two-time NBA All-Star and winning an NBA Championship in 2005 in his final year with the San Antonio Spurs.Notably, this is the final draft to date to see all of the first three picks make All-Star rosters with the teams that originally drafted them.

1994 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1994 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

2008–09 Phoenix Suns season

The 2008–09 Phoenix Suns season was the 41st season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The season was to be a promising one, filled with All-Star talent at several positions. It was believed over the offseason, the Suns would be able to better incorporate Shaquille O'Neal, who necessitated changes to both the offense and defense after being obtained in a trade one season ago. It was also the first season head coach Terry Porter had been able to use the summer to implement his defensive approach for a team which had in seasons past scored a large number of their points off fast breaks and early in the shot clock. Sensing a need for change, team management traded for scorer Jason Richardson in December, but this did not appear to immediately reinvigorate an offense that had recently led the league in points per game. However, after Phoenix went 28–23 to start the season, Suns assistant Alvin Gentry was named to replace Porter as head coach. Less than one week after the All-Star Game, Amar'e Stoudemire sustained a season-ending eye injury while the improvement of the team never fully came. The Suns finished 46–36, second in the Pacific division but out the playoffs for the first time since Steve Nash rejoined the Suns in the 2004–05 season.

2010–11 Phoenix Suns season

The 2010–11 Phoenix Suns season was the 43rd season for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association (NBA). For the first time in eight seasons, the Suns were without the play of power forward Amar'e Stoudemire, a 5-time All-Star and former Rookie of the Year who joined the New York Knicks in the summer. The Suns traded Jason Richardson on December 18, 2010 as part of a trade that brought Vince Carter to the Suns. On February 24, 2011, the Suns traded Goran Dragić and the draft pick they got earlier from Orlando in exchange for Aaron Brooks. Alvin Gentry was head coach and the Suns played their home games at US Airways Center.

Detroit Pistons

The Detroit Pistons are an American professional basketball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Pistons compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Central Division and plays its home games at Little Caesars Arena. The team was founded in Fort Wayne, Indiana as the Fort Wayne (Zollner) Pistons in 1941, a member of the National Basketball League (NBL) where it won two NBL championships: in 1944 and 1945. The Pistons later joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA) in 1948. The NBL and BAA merged to become the NBA in 1949, and the Pistons became part of the merged league. Since moving to Detroit in 1957, the Pistons have won three NBA championships: in 1989, 1990 and 2004.

Grant Hill, San Diego

Grant Hill is a neighborhood in San Diego, California bordered by Golden Hill to the north, Stockton to the east, Sherman Heights to the west, and Logan Heights to the south. 30th Street connects Grant Hill to the neighborhood of Golden Hill.

Grant Hill (politician)

Grant Hill (born September 20, 1943) is a former Canadian Member of Parliament for the Conservative Party of Canada (2004), and a former member of the Canadian Alliance (2000–2004) and the Reform Party of Canada (1993–2000).

Grant Hill (producer)

Grant Hill is an Australian film producer and unit production manager.He received a 1999 Academy Award for Best Picture nomination for the 1998 film The Thin Red Line. He received a similar nomination for 2011's The Tree of Life.

He has been the line producer and unit production manager of all of the Wachowskis' films since The Matrix Reloaded, on which he was credited as an executive producer.

NBA Inside Stuff

NBA Inside Stuff is a television program airing on NBA TV and previously aired on NBC for many years, then on ABC, featuring behind the scenes activities of NBA players. The program also includes features on fitness and fundamentals of basketball. Previously hosted by Ahmad Rashād (and once co-hosted by Julie Moran, and then Willow Bay) and Summer Sanders, the show is now hosted by former NBA star Grant Hill and Kristen Ledlow.

NBA Rookie of the Year Award

The National Basketball Association's Rookie of the Year Award is an annual National Basketball Association (NBA) award given to the top rookie(s) of the regular season. Initiated following the 1952–53 NBA season, it confers the Eddie Gottlieb Trophy, named after the former Philadelphia Warriors head coach.

The winner is selected by a panel of United States and Canadian sportswriters and broadcasters, each casting first, second, and third place votes (worth five points, three points, and one point respectively). The player(s) with the highest point total, regardless of the number of first-place votes, wins the award.The most recent Rookie of the Year winner is Ben Simmons. Twenty-one winners were drafted first overall. There has only been one winner taken in the second round of the draft, Malcolm Brogdon, who was taken 36th overall by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 2016 draft. Sixteen winners have also won the NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP) award in their careers; Wilt Chamberlain and Wes Unseld earning both honors the same season. Nineteen of the forty two non-active winners have been elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Three seasons had joint winners—Dave Cowens and Geoff Petrie in the 1970–71 season, Grant Hill and Jason Kidd in the 1994–95 season, and Elton Brand and Steve Francis in the 1999–2000 season. Five players won the award unanimously (by capturing all of the first-place votes) – Ralph Sampson, David Robinson, Blake Griffin, Damian Lillard, and Karl-Anthony Towns.Patrick Ewing of Jamaica, Pau Gasol of Spain, Kyrie Irving and Ben Simmons of Australia and Andrew Wiggins of Canada are the only winners not born in the United States. Three of these individuals have dual nationality by birth—Wiggins and Simmons have American fathers, and both of Irving's parents are Americans. Ewing immigrated to the Boston area at age 11, Irving moved to the United States at age 2, and Wiggins and Simmons moved to the U.S. while in high school. Gasol is the only winner trained totally outside the U.S.

NBA Sportsmanship Award

The NBA Sportsmanship Award is an annual National Basketball Association (NBA) award given to a player who most "exemplifies the ideals of sportsmanship on the court with ethical behavior, fair play, and integrity." It is directly analogous to the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award, which has been awarded by the NBA's sister league, the WNBA, with neither award demanding excellence of play.

Every year, each of the 30 NBA teams nominates one of its players to compete for this award. From these nominees, one player from each NBA division are selected by a panel as the divisional Sportsmanship Award winners. At the end of the regular season, players in the league cast votes for the award, with eleven points given for each first-place vote, nine for second-place vote, seven points for third, five points for fourth, three points for fifth and one point for each sixth place vote received. The player with the highest point total, regardless of the number of first-place votes, wins the award and presented with the Joe Dumars Trophy; named after the former Detroit Pistons player and the award's inaugural recipient.Grant Hill has won the award three times; the most in NBA history. Kemba Walker, Jason Kidd and Mike Conley are the only other players to have won it multiple times, each having done so twice.

Orlando Magic

The Orlando Magic are an American professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. The Magic compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Southeast Division. The franchise was established in 1989 as an expansion franchise, and such notable NBA stars as Shaquille O'Neal, Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, Grant Hill, Tracy McGrady, Steve Francis, Dwight Howard, Vince Carter, Rashard Lewis, Dominique Wilkins, and Hedo Türkoğlu have played for the club throughout its young history. As of 2017, the franchise has played in the NBA playoffs for exactly half of its existence (14 playoff appearances in 28 years), and twice went to the NBA Finals, in 1995 and 2009. Orlando has been the second most successful of the four expansion teams brought into the league in 1988 and 1989 in terms of winning percentage, only after the Miami Heat.

Sherman Heights, San Diego

Sherman Heights is a neighborhood in San Diego bordered by Golden Hill to the north, Grant Hill to the east, East Village to the west, and Logan Heights to the south.The Sherman Heights neighborhood has the following roadways as boundaries: Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway to the north, 25th Street to the east, Imperial Avenue to the south, and Interstate 5 to the west.

Stockton, San Diego

Stockton is a neighborhood in San Diego, California bordered by Golden Hill to the north, Mountain View and Mt. Hope to the east, Grant Hill to the west, and Logan Heights to the south. I-15 forms the eastern boundary.This area is named after Robert Field Stockton (1795–1866), a United States Navy commodore, active in the capture of California during the Mexican–American War. He was a naval innovator and an early advocate for a propeller-driven, steam-powered navy. Stockton was from a notable political family and also served as a U.S. Senator from New Jersey.

There was previously a Stockton Elementary, now renamed King Chavez Elementary.

The Shot (Duke–Kentucky)

The 1992 NCAA Tournament was highlighted by a game between Duke and Kentucky in the East Regional Final to determine the final spot in the Final Four. With 2.1 seconds remaining in overtime, defending national champion Duke trailed 103–102. Grant Hill threw a pass the length of the court to Christian Laettner, who faked right, dribbled once, turned, and hit a jumper as time expired for the 104–103 win. In 2004 Sports Illustrated deemed it the greatest college basketball game of all time, and ESPN included it as number 17 on its list of top 100 sports moments of the past 25 years (see ESPN25). It is ranked number one on the list of the greatest NCAA tournament games of all time compiled by USA Today in 2002.

Tony Ressler

Antony P. Ressler (born July 16, 1959) is an American businessman. He co-founded the private equity firm Apollo Global Management in 1990; and co-founded the private equity firm Ares Management in 1997. Ressler and Grant Hill are both owners of the Atlanta Hawks. They purchased the team on June 24, 2015 for an estimated $730 million - $850 million.

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