Grant Gillis

Grant Gillis (January 24, 1901 – February 4, 1981) was a utility infielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1927 through 1929 for the Washington Senators (1927–28) and Boston Red Sox (1929). Listed at 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m), 165 lb., Gillis batted and threw right-handed. A native of Grove Hill, Alabama,[1] he was signed by Washington out of the University of Alabama. At Alabama he was the first quarterback under Wallace Wade.

In a three-season career, Gillis was a .245 hitter (48-for-196) with 10 RBI and 26 runs in 62 games, including 12 doubles and two triples. He did not hit a home run. As an infielder, he made 59 appearances at second base (30), shortstop (26) and third base (3).

Gillis died in Thomasville, Alabama, at age 80.[1]

Grant Gillis
Infielder
Born: January 24, 1901
Grove Hill, Alabama
Died: February 4, 1981 (aged 80)
Thomasville, Alabama
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 19, 1927, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
June 25, 1929, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.245
Home runs0
Runs batted in23
Teams

Trivia

References

  1. ^ a b

External links

1901 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1901 throughout the world.

1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1923 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 30th overall and 2nd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, two losses and one tie (7–2–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SoCon).

1923 marked the first season for new head coach Wallace Wade, a former assistant at Vanderbilt. One year after Alabama's triumphal trip to Penn, the Tide went on another northeast roadtrip with a different outcome, losing to Syracuse 23–0. Against Georgia Tech, Alabama was very lucky to escape with a 0–0 tie. After defeating Georgia, the Tide was the favorite for a Southern title. A season-ending, 16–6 upset loss to coach James Van Fleet's Florida Gators cost coach Wade and the Tide the Southern Conference championship.

1923 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1923 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1923 Southern Conference football season.

Vanderbilt won the SoCon championship, its last conference title to date. Florida upset previously undefeated Alabama on the last week of play.

1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1924 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 31st overall and 3rd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of eight wins and one loss (8–1 overall, 5–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and won the Champ Pickens Trophy.

Alabama opened the season with six consecutive shutout victories. After they defeated Union University at Tuscaloosa, the Crimson Tide defeated Furman in their first road contest of the season. Alabama returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi College a week prior to their victory over Sewanee at Birmingham in their SoCon opener. The Crimson Tide continued their dominance with victories at Georgia Tech and in Montgomery against Ole Miss before they allowed their first points of the season in their homecoming victory over Kentucky. Alabama then closed the season with a pair of games at Birmingham where they first lost their lone game against Centre and defeated Georgia in their final game and captured their first SoCon championship.

1924 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1924 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1924 Southern Conference football season.

Alabama won the SoCon championship. Centre defeated Alabama and claims a Southern championship, even though Centre was never a member of the Southern Conference.

1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1925 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 32nd overall and 4th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with their first ever perfect record (10–0 overall, 7–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and as national champions after they defeated Washington in the Rose Bowl.The Crimson Tide entered the season as the defending Southern Conference champions after finishing the 1924 season with an 8–1 record. Alabama would then go on and shutout all but one of their regular season opponents en route to a second consecutive Southern Conference championship. The Crimson Tide then accepted an invitation to participate as the first Southern team in the annual Rose Bowl Game, where they defeated Washington 20–19. This victory has subsequently been recognized as one of the most important in Southern football history as well as has been deemed "the game that changed the South."

1927 Washington Senators season

The 1927 Washington Senators won 85 games, lost 69, and finished in third place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1928 Washington Senators season

The 1928 Washington Senators won 75 games, lost 79, and finished in fourth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1929 Boston Red Sox season

The 1929 Boston Red Sox season was the 29th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 58 wins and 96 losses.

1936 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1936 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 53 wins and 100 losses.

1937 Boston Red Sox season

The 1937 Boston Red Sox season was the 37th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 80 wins and 72 losses.

1981 Major League Baseball season

The 1981 Major League Baseball season had a players' strike, which lasted from June 12 to July 31, 1981, and split the season in two halves.

The All-Star Game was originally to be played on July 14, but was cancelled due to the strike. It was then brought back and played on August 9, as a prelude to the second half of the season, which began the following day.

Bobby Reeves (baseball)

Robert "Bobby" Edwin Reeves (June 24, 1904 – June 4, 1993) was an infielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1926 through 1931 for the Washington Senators (1926–28) and Boston Red Sox (1929–31). Listed at 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 170 lb., Reeves batted and threw right-handed. A native of Hill City, Tennessee, he was signed by Washington out of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

A versatile utility man, Reeves was able to play all positions except catcher. He made 479 appearances at third base (229), shortstop, second base (67), first base (1), right field (1), and also served as an emergency pitcher (1).

Reeves posted career-numbers with a .303 batting average and 46 RBI for the 1928 Washington Senators, before being dealt in a five-for-one trade to the Boston Red Sox along with Elliot Bigelow, Milt Gaston, Grant Gillis, and Hod Lisenbee in exchange for Buddy Myer. In 1929, he posted a career-high 140 games with Boston, including 131 appearances as the team's regular third base.

In a six-season career, Reeves was a .252 hitter (402-for-1598) with eight home runs and 135 RBI in 502 games, including 203 runs, 55 doubles, eight triples, 21 stolen bases, and a .331 on-base percentage.

Reeves died in Chattanooga, Tennessee, 20 days short of his 89th birthday.

Boston Red Sox all-time roster

The following is a list of players, past and present, who have appeared in at least one competitive game for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (founded in 1908), known previously as the Boston Americans (1901–07).

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Non-US players are indicated by the appropriate flag.

Buddy Myer

Charles Solomon "Buddy" Myer (March 16, 1904 – October 31, 1974) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1925 to 1941.

An excellent hitter, he batted .300 or better nine times, and retired with a career average of .303. Myer walked more than twice as many times as he struck out. Apart from a brief period with the Boston Red Sox in 1927–28, he spent his entire career with the Washington Senators.

Grove Hill, Alabama

Grove Hill is a town in Clarke County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 1,570. It is the county seat of Clarke County and home of the Clarke County Museum.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide starting quarterbacks

This is a list of every Alabama Crimson Tide football team quarterback and the years they participated on the Alabama Crimson Tide football team.

Alabama quarterbacks have played prominent roles in American society off the gridiron as well. Both Farley Moody and Charlie Joplin died while serving in the First World War.

List of Major League Baseball players (G)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 934 players with a last name that begins with G who have been on a major league roster at some point.

Minnesota Twins all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Minnesota Twins American League franchise (1961–present), also known previously as the Washington Senators (1901–1960).

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

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