Granny Hamner

Granville Wilbur Hamner (April 26, 1927 – September 12, 1993) was an American shortstop and second baseman in Major League Baseball. Hamner was one of the key players on the "Whiz Kids", the 1950 National League champion Philadelphia Phillies. He was born in Richmond, Virginia and graduated from Benedictine High School.

Hamner (whose brother Garvin was also an infielder in the majors) spent ​15 12 years with the Phillies, coming to the club as a 17-year-old during World War II and becoming one of the team leaders of the 1950 champions at the age of 23. A right-handed hitting shortstop with power, Hamner compiled more than 80 runs batted in four times. In the 1950 World Series, a four-game New York Yankees sweep dominated by Yankee pitchers, Hamner batted .429 (6 for 14) with three extra-base hits. In March 1952, Hamner was named captain of the Phillies by manager Eddie Sawyer.[1]

An All-Star three years in a row, Hamner was the National League's starting shortstop in the 1952 All-Star Game, played on his home field, Shibe Park, in Philadelphia. The game was called off after five innings due to rain.

On May 16, 1959, Hamner was traded to Cleveland, but he batted only .164 for the remainder of the campaign. He then became a manager in the minor league system of the Kansas City Athletics, reappearing briefly with the A's as a pitcher during the 1962 season (he had dabbled on the mound for the 1956-57 Phillies).[2] But the change did not prolong Hamner's playing career. He briefly managed in the Phils' farm system in the 1970s and 1980s.

In 17 major league seasons, Hamner compiled a .262 batting average with 104 home runs. He was winless with two losses with an earned run average of 5.40 in seven games and ​13 13 innings as a pitcher.

In 1981, Hamner was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

He died of a heart attack at age 66 in Philadelphia.

Granny Hamner
Granny Hamner
Shortstop / Second baseman
Born: April 26, 1927
Richmond, Virginia
Died: September 12, 1993 (aged 66)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 14, 1944, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
August 1, 1962, for the Kansas City Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.262
Home runs104
Runs batted in708
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Notes

  1. ^ "Hamner is Given Authority as Team Captain of Phillies". Milwaukee Journal. 1952-03-18. p. 2.
  2. ^ Preston, JG. "Major league players who converted to pitching after becoming minor league managers". prestonjg.wordpress.com. Retrieved 30 January 2017.

Further reading

DeLuca, Duke (1972-04-18). "Off the Cuff". Reading Eagle. p. 30.
Kaplan, Mathew (2018-04-08). "Granny Hamner: More Than Baseball".

External links

1947 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1947 Philadelphia Phillies season saw the Phillies finish in seventh place in the National League with a record of 62 wins and 92 losses. It was the first season for Phillies television broadcasts, which debuted on WPTZ.

1950 World Series

The 1950 World Series was the 47th World Series between the American and National Leagues for the championship of Major League Baseball. The Philadelphia Phillies as 1950 champions of the National League and the New York Yankees, as 1950 American League champions, competed to win a best-of-seven game series.

The Series began on Wednesday, October 4, and concluded Saturday, October 7. The Phillies had home field advantage for the Series, meaning no games would be played at the Yankees' home ballpark, Yankee Stadium, until game 3. The Yankees won their 13th championship in their 41-year history, taking the Series in a four-game sweep. The final game in the Series resulted in the New York Yankees winning, 5–2 over Philadelphia. It was the only game in the Series decided by more than one run. The 1950 World Series title would be the second of a record five straight titles for the New York Yankees (1949–1953). The two teams would not again meet in the Series for 59 years.

This was also the last all-white World Series as neither club had integrated in 1950. It was also the last World Series where television coverage was pooled between the four major networks of the day: that season, the Mutual Broadcasting System, who had long been the radio home for the World Series, purchased the TV rights despite not (and indeed, never) having a television network. They would eventually sell on the rights to NBC, beginning a long relationship with the sport.

1952 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1952 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 19th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1952, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania the home of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 3–2 in 5 innings. It was the first All-Star Game—and to date, the only—to be called early due to rain.

Mickey Mantle was selected an All-Star for the first time, as was pitcher Satchel Paige, who a day before the game turned 46 years old. Neither appeared in the game.

1954 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1954 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 21st playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1954, at Cleveland Municipal Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio the home of the Cleveland Indians of the American League.

1962 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1962 Kansas City Athletics season was the eighth season in Kansas City, and the 62nd in franchise history. It involved the Athletics finishing ninth in the American League with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses, 24 games behind the World Series Champion New York Yankees. The A's were last in the American League in paid attendance.

1968 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1968 followed rules revised in June 1967, which returned the BBWAA to annual elections without any provision for runoff.

In the event, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted once by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Joe Medwick.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It selected two players, Kiki Cuyler and Goose Goslin.

Bobby Morgan (baseball)

Bobby Morris Morgan (born June 29, 1926) is an American former professional baseball infielder. He played eight seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1950 and 1958 for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, and Chicago Cubs.Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Morgan began his pro career in 1944, playing for two minor league teams before he was drafted for World War II military duty and spent the 1945–46 seasons in the United States Army, where he served in the European Theater of Operations. In 1949, he was named Most Valuable Player and All-Star shortstop of the Triple-A International League after he won the league batting crown (.337) and collected 112 runs batted in as a member of the Montreal Royals.

Morgan's days with the Dodgers were spent as a utility infielder, playing behind Hall of Famers Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson, All-Star Gil Hodges, 1953 Rookie of the Year Jim Gilliam and slick-fielding Billy Cox. He played in three World Series games for the Dodgers. In the 1952 series he was a defensive replacement in game 4, and lined out as a pinch hitter in the ninth inning of Game 7 against Bob Kuzava of the New York Yankees. In the 1953 fall classic he again lined out as a pinch hitter, in the seventh inning of game 6.

Traded to the Phillies in March 1954, Morgan enjoyed his best big-league season that year, setting personal bests in hits (119), doubles, home runs (14), RBI (50) and batting average (.262) as the Phillies' starting shortstop, where he displaced veteran former "Whiz Kid" Granny Hamner. The following year, Morgan moved to second base, but slumped at the plate.

Overall, as a big-leaguer, Morgan collected 487 hits, with 96 doubles, 11 triples and 53 home runs. He batted .233.

Morgan's playing career continued in the minor leagues through 1963, he then managed for three seasons (1964–66) in the Phillie farm system and scouted for the Baltimore Orioles, Kansas City Royals and Minnesota Twins.

Eddie Miller (infielder)

Edward Robert Miller (November 26, 1916 – July 31, 1997) was an American professional baseball player, a shortstop who played for 14 seasons in the National League between 1936 and 1950. He was a talented fielder and a perennial All-Star during the 1940s.

Born in Pittsburgh, Miller made his Major League debut with the Cincinnati Reds in 1936 as a 19-year-old. He played in 41 games over 2 seasons with the Reds before being traded to the New York Yankees in 1938 in exchange for Willard Hershberger. Miller never played for the Yankees at the major league level and was subsequently traded to the Boston Bees less than a year later.

He became the starting shortstop while in Boston, and established himself as one of the National League's best shortstops during his four seasons there. His first season with Boston was shortened when he fractured his ankle in a collision with Al Simmons. He recovered in 1940 to a career-best .276 for the Bees while leading all NL shortstops in fielding percentage and appearing in the MLB All-Star Game. While his batting average fell over the next two seasons with Boston, he led all shortstops in fielding percentage both years. He was an All-Star in 1941 and was named as a starter in the All-Star Game in 1942. After the 1942 season, he was traded back to the Reds in exchange for Eddie Joost and Nate Andrews.

He spent five seasons as the Reds' starting shortstop and earned four more selections to the All-Star Game while with the club. He continued to play solid defense while with Cincinnati, and he led all shortstops in fielding on two further occasions. His final year with the Reds was one of his better seasons as a hitter, as he led the league in doubles and was among the top 10 in home runs and runs batted in. He was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies for Johnny Wyrostek before the start of the 1948 season.

Miller served as the Phillies' shortstop in 1948 but moved to second base in 1949 when he swapped positions with Granny Hamner. After two average seasons with Philadelphia, he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals for the 1950 season, his last in the majors.

Miller died in 1997 in Lake Worth, Florida.

Eddie O'Brien (baseball)

Edward Joseph O'Brien (December 11, 1930 – February 21, 2014) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop, outfielder and pitcher. He played his entire five-year baseball career for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1953, 1955–58). His twin brother, Johnny, is a former second baseman and pitcher.

O'Brien attended Saint Mary's High School in South Amboy, now Cardinal McCarrick High School, where he has been inducted into the school's sports hall of fame.He attended Seattle University, where he played on the basketball team for the Chieftains (along with his brother Johnny) and participated in a stunning 84–81 upset over the Harlem Globetrotters on January 21, 1952. Later he and Johnny were drafted by the NBA's Milwaukee Hawks in 1953, but they never played in the NBA.

While in Pittsburgh, Johnny and Eddie O'Brien became the first twins in major league history to play for the same team in the same game. They are also one of only four brother combinations to play second base/shortstop on the same major league club. The others are Garvin and Granny Hamner, for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945; Frank and Milt Bolling, with the Detroit Tigers in 1958, and Billy and Cal Ripken, for the Baltimore Orioles during the 1980s.

In Jim Bouton's book Ball Four, a memoir of the 1969 baseball season, O'Brien—who in that year had served as bullpen coach for the Seattle Pilots expansion club—was represented as Bouton's consistent antagonist. O'Brien also worked as the Athletic Director at Seattle University and as an energy consultant for the Alaskan shipping industry.On February 21, 2014, O'Brien died at the age of 83.

Frank Bolling

Frank Elmore Bolling (born November 16, 1931) is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball who played from 1954 through 1966 for the Detroit Tigers (1954, 1956–1960) and the Milwaukee / Atlanta Braves (1961–66). He hit and threw right-handed, and is the younger brother of shortstop Milt Bolling (now deceased).

In a 12-season career, he hit .254 with 106 home runs and 556 runs batted in (RBIs) in 1540 games played.

He reached the majors in 1954 with the Detroit Tigers, playing six seasons with them before moving to the Milwaukee Braves in 1961. He was on the Braves roster when the team moved to Atlanta in 1966.

A fine defensive second baseman, Bolling also averaged 14 home runs from 1957 to 1959, with a career-high 15 in 1957. His most productive season was 1958, when he posted career numbers in hits (164), doubles (27), runs and RBIs (75), and won the Gold Glove Award after leading the American League second basemen in fielding percentage. When his brother Milt was traded to Detroit during the same season, the Bollings became one of only four brother combinations in major league history to play second base / shortstop on the same club. The others are Garvin and Granny Hamner (for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945), the twins Eddie and Johnny O'Brien with the Pittsburgh Pirates in the mid-1950s, and Cal and Billy Ripken for the Baltimore Orioles during the 1980s.Traded to the Braves for Bill Bruton after the 1960 season, Bolling led National League second basemen in fielding in 1961, 1962 and 1964. He made the National League All-Star team in 1961 and 1962, and also was named on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team in 1961. He never played an inning at any position other than second base, ending with a career fielding mark of .982.

Garvin Hamner

Wesley Garvin Hamner (March 18, 1924 – December 15, 2003) was an American professional baseball player. A second baseman and shortstop, he appeared in one season (1945) for the Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball. His younger brother, Granny Hamner, would become the Phillies' star shortstop of the 1950 "Whiz Kids" National League championship team, while Garvin spent all but two months of his 11-year career in minor league baseball.

The two Hamners were teammates briefly on the 1945 Phils. While Granny was the better prospect, and had a 17-year MLB career, the similarity in their names caused a mixup during the 1947 Rule 5 draft. The St. Louis Browns had scouted Granny and wanted to draft him off the Phils' Utica Blue Sox minor-league roster. But they selected Garvin's name by mistake — and Granny remained with the Phillies, for whom he would later star.Garvin Hamner, a lifelong resident of Richmond, Virginia, threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 172 pounds (78 kg). In 32 Major League games in 1945, he collected 20 hits in 101 at bats, including three doubles, for a batting average of .198. He was sent to the Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association in June and played the rest of his career in the minors. He died at age 79 in Richmond.

Hamner

Hamner is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Cully Hamner (born 1969), American comic book artist

Earl Hamner, Jr. (1923-2016), American television writer and producer

Granny Hamner (1927–1993), American shortstop and second baseman in Major League Baseball

Henry K. Hamner (1922–1945), United States Navy officer

Scott Hamner (21st century), American television writer

Johnny O'Brien

John Thomas O'Brien (born December 11, 1930) is a former backup second baseman and pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1953, 1955–58), St. Louis Cardinals (1958) and Milwaukee Braves (1959). O'Brien batted and threw right-handed. His twin brother, Eddie, was also a major league infielder.

O'Brien attended Saint Mary's High School in South Amboy, now Cardinal McCarrick High School, where he has been inducted into the school's sports hall of fame.O'Brien attended Seattle University, where he played on the basketball team for the Chieftains (along with his brother Eddie) and scored 43 points in a stunning 84–81 upset over the Harlem Globetrotters on January 21, 1952. In 1953, O'Brien became the first player in NCAA history to score 1,000 points in a season. O'Brien would be the shortest NCAA All-American player to be named until 2016 when the similarly 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) Tyler Ulis of Kentucky was named a member of the first team. Later he and Eddie were drafted by the NBA's Milwaukee Hawks in 1953, but the twins never played in the NBA.

In a six-season career, O'Brien was a .250 hitter (204-for-815) with four home runs and 59 RBI in 339 games played. From 1956–58, he also doubled as a pitcher, appearing in 25 games (all but one in relief) and 61 innings, surrendering 61 hits, walking 30 and striking out 35. He lost three of four decisions (.250) with an earned run average of 5.61.

While in Pittsburgh, Johnny and Eddie O'Brien became the first twins in major league history to play for the same team in the same game. They are also one of only four brother combinations to play second base/shortstop on the same major league club. The others are Garvin and Granny Hamner, for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945; Frank and Milt Bolling, with the Detroit Tigers in 1958, and Billy and Cal Ripken, for the Baltimore Orioles during the 1980s.

In retirement, O'Brien worked variously as a city councilman in Seattle, a sportscaster of Seattle University basketball games along with Keith Jackson, the head of security, sales and promotions at the Kingdome and an energy consultant for the Alaskan shipping industry.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (H)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 133 have had surnames beginning with the letter H. One of those players has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; center fielder Billy Hamilton played for the Phillies for six seasons (1890–1895), amassing three career franchise records and three single-season records. Hamilton's .361 batting average, .463 on-base percentage, and 508 stolen bases lead all Phillies in those categories, and his single-season records include most runs scored (192 in the 1894 season; also a major league record), most stolen bases (111 in the 1891 season), and highest on-base percentage (.523 in 1894). The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Hamilton's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as is Whiz Kid shortstop and second baseman Granny Hamner.Among the 73 batters in this list, Lou Hardie has the highest batting average, at .375; he notched three hits in eight at-bats during the 1884 season. Other players with an average above .300 include Hamilton, George Harper (.323 in three seasons), Chicken Hawks (.322 in one season), Butch Henline (.304 in six seasons), Chuck Hiller (.302 in one season), Walter Holke (.301 in three seasons), Paul Hoover (.308 in two seasons), and Don Hurst (.303 in seven seasons). Ryan Howard leads all members of this list with 253 home runs and 748 runs batted in in his seven seasons with the Phillies.Of this list's 62 pitchers, Bert Humphries has the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; his three wins and one loss notched him a .750 win ratio in his one season with the team. Cole Hamels' 74 victories and 1,091 strikeouts are the most by a player on this list, while Ken Heintzelman and Bill Hubbell lead with 55 defeats each. Tom Hilgendorf has the lowest earned run average (ERA) among pitchers, with a 2.14 mark; the only player to best Hilgendorf in that category on this list is Holke, a first baseman, who made one pitching appearance in 1979, throwing ​1⁄3 inning and allowing no runs (a 0.00 ERA). Roy Halladay is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, and the only man to accomplish the feat twice; in Halladay's first season with Philadelphia, he pitched a perfect game on May 29, 2010, and later became the second player to pitch a no-hitter in the postseason on October 6, 2010.Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position player. Bill Harman batted .071 in 14 plate appearances as a catcher while amassing a 4.85 ERA and striking out three as a pitcher. Hardie Henderson allowed 19 runs in his only game as a pitcher while notching a .250 average as a left fielder.

Ted Kazanski

Theodore Stanley Kazanski (born January 25, 1934) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball who played from 1953 through 1958 for the Philadelphia Phillies. Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 175 lb., he batted and threw right-handed.

A native of Hamtramck, Michigan, Kazanski was a classic slick fielder, slap-hitter, who used the entire field to his advantage. One of the most highly rated schoolboy ballplayers of his time, he was given a reported $100,000 bonus to sign with the Phillies in 1951.

He spent two and a half seasons in the Philadelphia Minor League system before joining the big club in the 1953 midseason, at nineteen years of age.

In his majors debut, Kazanski went 3-for-6 and drove in four runs from the top of the order, to lead the Phillies to a 13–2 victory over the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field. Kazanski became the first player since 1920 – the first season runs batted in was recorded as an official statistic – to drive in at least four runs as a shortstop in his major league debut, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. He finished the season with a .217 batting average in 95 games.

In 1954 Kazanski was relegated to backup and platoon infield duties, splitting time with Bobby Morgan and Granny Hamner. He spent most of 1955 at Triple-A. His most productive season came in 1956, when he posted career-highs in games (117), home runs (4), RBI (34) and hits (80), while hitting .211. In that season, he belted a three-run home run (on April 22 [1]) and an inside-the-park grand slam (on August 8), to provide two of the 19 victories of Phillies pitching ace Robin Roberts. He also started a triple play in the same game as his inside the park grand slam, a feat that would not be duplicated until Ángel Pagán did so on May 19, 2010From 1957 to 1958, he divided his playing time between Triple-A and the Phillies.

In a six-season majors career, Kazanski was a .217 hitter (288-for-1329) with 14 home runs and 116 in 417 games, including 118 runs, 49 doubles, nine triples and four stolen bases.

In 1959, Kazanski was sent by Philadelphia along with Stan Lopata to the Milwaukee Braves in the same transaction that brought Gene Conley, Harry Hanebrink and Joe Koppe to the Phillies. He played in the Braves minor league system until 1963, when was traded to Detroit in exchange for Ozzie Virgil.

Kazanski also saw action in the minors with the Kansas City Athletics, Cleveland Indians, Los Angeles Angels, Washington Senators and New York Yankees organizations, hitting .253 with 70 home runs and 244 RBI in 1183 games until he retired after the 1964 season. He was through by the age of thirty years.

Following his playing career, Kazanski coached in the Detroit Tigers organization and also worked as an assistant for the baseball team at the University of Detroit Mercy, which he attended.

Utica Blue Sox

The Utica Blue Sox was the name of two minor league baseball teams based in Utica, New York.

In the 2010s, the Utica Blue Sox is the name of a collegiate wooden bat baseball team of the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League based in New York State.

Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Important figures
Retired numbers
Key personnel
World Series
championships
(2)
NL pennants (7)
Divisionchampionships (11)
Minor league
affiliates
Broadcasting
Inducted as
Phillies
Inducted as
Athletics

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.