Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance

The Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to female recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality vocal performances in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, the award was first presented to Donna Summer in 1980. Beginning with the 1995 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. However, in 1988, 1992, 1994, and since 2005, this category was combined with the Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and presented in a genderless category known as Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo. The solo category was later renamed to Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance beginning in 2005. This fusion has been criticized, especially when female performers are not nominated under the solo category.[3] The Academy has cited a lack of eligible recordings in the female rock category as the reason for the mergers.[4] While the award has not been presented since the category merge in 2005, an official confirmation of its retirement has not been announced.

Pat Benatar, Sheryl Crow, and Tina Turner hold the record for the most wins in this category, with four wins each. Melissa Etheridge and Alanis Morissette have been presented the award two times each. Crow's song "There Goes the Neighborhood" was nominated twice; one version from the album The Globe Sessions was nominated in 1999 (but lost to Morissette's song "Uninvited"), and a live version from the album Sheryl Crow and Friends: Live from Central Park was nominated and won in 2001. Since its inception, American artists have been presented with the award more than any other nationality, though it has been presented to vocalists from Canada three times. Stevie Nicks holds the record for the most nominations without a win, with five.

Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance
Awarded forQuality female vocal performances in the rock music genre
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1980
Last awarded2004
Websitegrammy.com

Recipients

Tina turner 21021985 01 350
Four-time award winner Tina Turner
PatBenatarLiveinSydney2010
Four-time award winner Pat Benatar
Bonnie Rait Crop
1990 award winner, Bonnie Raitt
Alannah Myles
1991 award winner, Alannah Myles
MelissaEtheridgeGuitarHWoFSept2011
Two-time award winnder Melissa Etheridge
Sheryl Crow 001
Four-time award winner Sheryl Crow
FionaApple
1998 award winner, Fiona Apple
Year[I] Performing artist Work Nominees Ref.
1980 Donna Summer "Hot Stuff"
[5]
1981 Pat Benatar Crimes of Passion [5]
1982 Pat Benatar "Fire and Ice" [6]
1983 Pat Benatar "Shadows of the Night" [7]
1984 Pat Benatar "Love Is a Battlefield" [5]
1985 Tina Turner "Better Be Good to Me" [8]
1986 Tina Turner "One of the Living"
[9]
1987 Tina Turner "Back Where You Started"
[5]
1988[II] N/A N/A N/A [4]
1989 Tina Turner Tina Live in Europe [5]
1990 Bonnie Raitt Nick of Time [10]
1991 Alannah Myles "Black Velvet"
[5]
1992[II] N/A N/A N/A [11]
1993 Melissa Etheridge "Ain't It Heavy"
[12]
1994[II] N/A N/A N/A [13]
1995 Melissa Etheridge "Come to My Window"
[5]
1996 Alanis Morissette "You Oughta Know"
[14]
1997 Sheryl Crow "If It Makes You Happy"
[15]
1998 Fiona Apple "Criminal"
[16]
1999 Alanis Morissette "Uninvited" [17]
2000 Sheryl Crow "Sweet Child o' Mine" [18]
2001 Sheryl Crow "There Goes the Neighborhood" [19]
2002 Lucinda Williams "Get Right With God" [20]
2003 Sheryl Crow "Steve McQueen"
[21]
2004 Pink "Trouble"
[22]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] Award was combined with the Best Male Rock Vocal Performance category and presented in a genderless category known as Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo.

See also

References

General
  • "Past Winners Search". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved March 4, 2011. Note: User must select the "Rock" category as the genre under the search feature.
  • "Grammy Awards: Best Rock Vocal Performance – Female". Rock on the Net. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on January 3, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  3. ^ Rodman, Sarah (February 8, 2009). "All my rocking ladies, don't bother putting your hands up". The Boston Globe. The New York Times Company. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  4. ^ a b Hunt, Dennis (January 15, 1988). "U2, Jackson Top Grammy Nominees: Simon, Winwood Seek Reprise of '87 Wins". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. p. 3. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Grammy Awards: Best Rock Vocal Performance – Female". Rock on the Net. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  6. ^ "Lennon, Jones lead Grammy nominees". The Milwaukee Journal. Journal Communications. January 14, 1982. Retrieved May 27, 2010.
  7. ^ "Toto Tops Grammy Nominees". Pittsburgh Press. E. W. Scripps Company. January 12, 1983. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  8. ^ Hilburn, Robert (February 23, 1985). "Here's one critic's picks for Grammys". Ottawa Citizen. Canwest. Retrieved May 27, 2010.
  9. ^ de Atley, Richard (January 10, 1986). "Dire Straits, Tina Turner, Sting lead performer nominations". Times-News. The New York Times Company. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  10. ^ "Here's list of nominees from all 77 categories". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News Publishing Company. January 12, 1990. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  11. ^ "Nominees announced for Grammy awards". TimesDaily. Tennessee Valley Printing. January 8, 1992. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  12. ^ "Grammy nominations". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland: Tribune Company. February 21, 1993. p. 1. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  13. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 7, 1994). "Sting, Joel top Grammy nominations". Star-News. The New York Times Company. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  14. ^ "List of Grammy nominees". CNN. January 4, 1996. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  15. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 8, 1997). "Babyface is up for 12 Grammy awards". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Journal Communications. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  16. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 7, 1998). "Grammys' dual Dylans". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Journal Communications. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  17. ^ "1999 Grammy Nominations". Reading Eagle. Reading Eagle Company. January 6, 1999. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  18. ^ "42nd Annual Grammy Awards nominations". CNN. January 4, 2000. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  19. ^ "Recording Academy Announces Grammy Nominations". CNN. January 3, 2001. Retrieved June 5, 2010.
  20. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  21. ^ Goldstein, Ben (January 15, 2003). "Grammy Nominees Announced". Blender. Alpha Media Group. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  22. ^ "They're All Contenders". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 5, 2003. Retrieved June 4, 2010.

External links

1959 (Patti Smith song)

"1959" is a rock song written by Patti Smith and Tony Shanahan, and released as a promo single from Patti Smith 1997 album Peace and Noise. In 1998 the song was nominated for Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.

Back Where You Started

"Back Where You Started" is a popular album track and the second (promotional only) single released in the United States by rock/soul singer Tina Turner, from her Platinum-certified Break Every Rule album.

The song was written by Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance, and produced by Adams and Bob Clearmountain. It was the second collaboration between Turner and Adams, their first being the 1985 hit "It's Only Love". Although "Back Where You Started" was never released commercially as a single, it was a hit on the US Rock Chart and won Turner a Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female in 1987.

Better Be Good to Me

"Better Be Good to Me" is a hit rock song, written by Mike Chapman, Nicky Chinn and Holly Knight, featured on Tina Turner's fifth studio album, Private Dancer (1984). The song was originally recorded and released in 1981 by Spider, a band from New York City with co-writer Holly Knight as a member. Tina Turner's version was successful in the United States on the Hot 100 and the US R&B/Hip-Hop chart. It peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and number six on the US R&B/Hip-hop chart. At the 27th Grammy Awards in 1985, it won Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, one of four Grammys awarded to Turner in that ceremony.The song was featured in the tenth episode of Miami Vice and was included on the first volume of the Miami Vice soundtrack.

Come to My Window

"Come to My Window" is a song by Melissa Etheridge released in 1993 on her 1993 album Yes I Am. This was the first song to be released after Etheridge publicly announced her sexual orientation of being a lesbian. With the driving force of gay rights, the song gained a lot of airplay on radio stations, mostly through call-in requests. The song debuted on the Billboard charts after the first week of its release, reaching number 25 on the chart. The song also charted in Canada, reaching number 13 on the RPM Top Singles chart. It was the second song from Etheridge that earned her a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.

Crimes of Passion (Pat Benatar album)

Crimes of Passion is the second studio album by American rock singer Pat Benatar, released on August 5, 1980 by Chrysalis Records. The album is the first to feature Myron Grombacher on drums, beginning a long tenure in Benatar's band that would last into the late-1990s.

The album debuted on the US Billboard 200 album chart the week ending August 23 and held at No. 2 for five weeks in the US in January 1981, behind John Lennon and Yoko Ono's Double Fantasy. It contains the hits "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" (US No. 9), "You Better Run" (US No. 42), "Treat Me Right" (US No. 18), plus a cover of Kate Bush's international hit, "Wuthering Heights". Crimes of Passion is Benatar's biggest selling career album, having been certified 4x Platinum (for sales of over four million copies) in the United States alone. In Billboard magazine's year end chart, Crimes of Passion was listed at number 5.The song "Hell Is for Children", which was not released as an A-side single, was also a hit on album-rock stations. A live version of this song from her album Live from Earth (1983) was released as the B-side of her "Love Is a Battlefield" single three years later. The song was featured in the 1981 animated film American Pop, as well as on the soundtrack.In 1981, Benatar won her first Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance thanks to Crimes of Passion.The music video for the song "You Better Run" was the second music video ever aired on MTV in 1981.

Crimes of Passion was reissued and remastered on Capitol Records in 2006.

Criminal (Fiona Apple song)

"Criminal" is a song by American recording artist Fiona Apple. It was released in September 1997 as the third single from the album Tidal (1996), and is Apple's biggest hit, peaking at No. 21 on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as No. 4 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. Apple has stated that the song is about "feeling bad for getting something so easily by using your sexuality".The song won the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance at the 40th Grammy Awards and was nominated for Best Rock Song. "Criminal" was listed at No. 55 on VH1's "100 Greatest Songs of the '90s", and No. 71 on Blender magazine's 2005 list of "The 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born".

Dangerous Curves (album)

Dangerous Curves is the fifth studio album by American hard rock/heavy metal singer and guitarist Lita Ford, released in 1991. Though it was a popular release and received heavy video rotation on MTV, the album was not as successful as its predecessor due to the sound of the album sounding largely 80s (because of the fact that the album's genre is glam metal) and musical tastes were shifting towards alternative rock in late 1991. The album charted on both the US and UK charts in 1992 and the single, "Shot of Poison", was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in 1993. This was Lita Ford's second ever Grammy nomination and her first since 1984's "Dancin' On The Edge".The track "Black Widow" is not to be confused for the track "Die for Me Only (Black Widow)" from Ford's 1983 debut Out for Blood.

Fire and Ice (Pat Benatar song)

"Fire and Ice" was the lead single off Pat Benatar's third album, Precious Time. Released July 6, 1981, the track was written by Pat Benatar, Tom Kelly, and Scott Sheets. It peaked at #17 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and peaked at #2 on the U.S. Mainstream billboard. The song also won Benatar her second Grammy award for Best Female Rock Performance in 1982.

Glitter in Their Eyes

"Glitter in Their Eyes" is a rock song written by Patti Smith and Oliver Ray, and released as a promo single from Patti Smith 2000 album Gung Ho. In 2001 the song was nominated for Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.Published Liner notes with the Gung Ho CD state the album was recorded at Sear Sound recording studio in New York City, mixed by Gil Norton and Danton Supple at The Church Studios in London, and Mastered by Ted Jensen at Sterling Sound in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan. However, the Glitter in Their Eyes single was mixed at Eden Studios in London, and Mastered by Ted Jensen and Paul Angeli at Sterling Sound in NYC. Additional musicians for the single include: backing vocals of Michael Stipe (of R.E.M.) and Wade Raley; and the Solo Guitar work of Tom Verlaine (frontman for the New York rock band Television).

If It Makes You Happy

"If It Makes You Happy" is the lead single from Sheryl Crow's 1996 eponymous album. The song peaked at number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the US. The track won Best Female Rock Vocal Performance at the 1997 Grammy Awards. The song ties with her hit, "My Favorite Mistake", as her third highest-charting single in the UK, reaching number nine on the UK Singles Chart. It also peaked at No. 1 in Canada and was her second No. 1 hit on the Canadian Hot AC chart.

In the 2009 VH1 Divas show, Crow and Miley Cyrus performed this song together.

Love Is a Battlefield

"Love Is a Battlefield" is a song performed by Pat Benatar, and written by Holly Knight and Mike Chapman. It was released in September 1983 as a single from Benatar's live album Live from Earth, though the song itself was a studio recording. The song was ranked at number 30 in VH1's list of the 100 Greatest Songs of the 1980s. "Love is a Battlefield" went on to sell over a million records.

Nick of Time (album)

Nick of Time is the 10th album by the American singer Bonnie Raitt, released on March 21, 1989.

Nick of Time topped the Billboard 200 chart, selling five million copies, and won three Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year, which was presented to Raitt & producer Don Was. In 2003, the album was ranked number 230 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The album was also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

One of the Living

“One of the Living” is a 1985 song by Tina Turner. It was one of two songs which Turner recorded for the film Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, in which she also starred. (“We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)” was the other.) The single reached number 15 on the American Billboard Hot 100.The song was written and composed by Holly Knight, who also co-wrote Turner's singles "The Best" and "Better Be Good to Me." In 1986, it won the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.

Peace and Noise

Peace and Noise is the seventh studio album by Patti Smith, released September 30, 1997 on Arista Records. Uncut magazine ranked the album 21st best of the year. Song "1959" was nominated for Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in 1998.

Shadows of the Night

"Shadows of the Night" is a song released by American rock singer Pat Benatar. It was first released in 1981 then came out in September 1982 as the lead single from her fourth studio album, Get Nervous.

D.L. Byron composed the song explicitly for the 1980 film Times Square, which tells the story of two young runaways in New York City, but it did not make it into the movie and Byron's own record label rejected it, claiming the song "wasn't commercial enough." Prior to Benatar's version, the song was released as a single by Helen Schneider in 1981 from her album Schneider with the Kick. According to Byron, Schneider's version went 5 times Platinum in Germany and the Benelux countries.The song was also recorded by singer Rachel Sweet for her 1981 album ...And Then He Kissed Me. In an interview with Byron, he described how Sweet received permission from him to change some of the lyrics.The song was a huge hit, peaking at #13 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and reaching #3 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Chart.

"Shadows of the Night" garnered Benatar her third Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in 1983.

There have been several cover versions of the song over the years. In 1983, the Rachel Sweet version was covered by singer-songwriter Randy VanWarmer on his 1983 album The Things That You Dream.

In 2005, the song was included as a musical number medley with the Quarterflash song "Harden My Heart" in the jukebox musical Rock of Ages. In the 2012 film adaptation of Rock of Ages, the song is performed by Mary J. Blige.

In 2008, the song was covered by Ashley Tisdale for the soundtrack of the TV film Picture This. That same year, another cover by Paul Layton was included on the soundtrack of the independent zombie comedy movie Dance of the Dead.

In 2014, the song was featured in the enhanced version of the video game Grand Theft Auto V on the in-game radio station Los Santos Rock Radio.

In 2015, the song was featured at the end of the Halloween episode of The Goldbergs.

Steve McQueen (song)

"Steve McQueen" is a song by American singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow, and is the lead track on her 2002 album, C'mon C'mon. It was released as the second single from the album, following "Soak Up the Sun" (see 2002 in music). Like "Soak Up the Sun", the video was directed by Wayne Isham. It features Crow racing around in various vehicles, recreating scenes from Steve McQueen movies. "Steve McQueen" reached #88 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song also became a dance hit peaking at #11 in Billboard Hot Dance Club Play. It was also successful on the Triple A chart reaching #2 on September 9, 2002.

The song won a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. Crow had won the award three times before for "If It Makes You Happy", "There Goes the Neighborhood", and "Sweet Child o' Mine".

There Goes the Neighborhood (Sheryl Crow song)

"There Goes the Neighborhood" is a 1998 song by Sheryl Crow. The song, released as the second single from her platinum album The Globe Sessions, won a Grammy award in 2001 for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. The song failed to chart in the United States except on the Billboard Triple A chart, where it peaked at number two for three weeks. Conversely, the song became Crow's eighth top-five single in Canada, reaching number four on the RPM Top Singles chart and number seven on the RPM Rock Report in April 1999. In Europe, the song reached number 19 on the UK Singles Chart and number 56 in Sweden.

Crow performed the song on her live album Sheryl Crow and Friends: Live from Central Park.

Tina Live in Europe

Tina Live in Europe is the first live album by Tina Turner, released on Capitol Records in 1988.

Uninvited (song)

"Uninvited" is a song by Canadian-American recording artist and songwriter Alanis Morissette, released as a single from the soundtrack of City of Angels in March 1998, becoming Morissette's first new recording since her international debut album. After the release of her breakthrough album Jagged Little Pill (1995) Morissette was considered one of the biggest music stars, and many fans anxiously awaited a follow-up album. Morissette wrote the song, whilst the production was handled by Morissette herself and Rob Cavallo. "Uninvited" is driven by four piano notes and builds to an instrumental climax, and haunting atmosphere accompanied by cryptic lyrics.

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