Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals

The Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to quality country music collaborations for artists who do not normally perform together.[2] Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[3]

Originally called the Best Country Vocal Performance, Duet, the award was first presented to Kenny Rogers and Ronnie Milsap at the 30th Grammy Awards in 1988 for the single "Make No Mistake, She's Mine". The next year, the category's name was changed to Best Country Vocal Collaboration, a name it held until 1996 when it was awarded as the Best Country Collaboration with Vocals. In 2011, the category was merged with the Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal and the Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance, forming the Grammy Award for Best Country Duo/Group Performance in order to "tighten the number of categories" at the Grammy Awards.[4]

Alison Krauss holds the record for having the most wins in this category, with a total of five. She is followed by seven others, who have all won the award twice. Among the most nominated are Emmylou Harris and Willie Nelson, both nine-time nominees. Krauss has been nominated eight ties, while Dolly Parton was a seven-time hopeful. Nominated bands include 1996 winners Shenandoah, a five-man country music band, three-time nominees the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, as well as one of the award's final recipients, the Zac Brown Band.

Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals
Awarded forquality country music collaborations with vocals
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1988
Last awarded2011
Websitegrammy.com

Recipients

Alison Krauss MerleFest 2007 01
Five-time award winner Alison Krauss, performing in 2007
EmmylouHarrisGreenbeltPicnic
1999 and 2000 award winner Emmylou Harris
Willie Nelson at Farm Aid 2009 - Cropped
2003 and 2008 award winner Willie Nelson
Kdlang22
k.d. lang, one of two winners born outside of the United States
Year[I] Performing artists Work Nominees Ref.
1988 Ronnie Milsap and Kenny Rogers "Make No Mistake, She's Mine" [5]
1989 k.d. lang and Roy Orbison "Crying" [6]
1990 Hank Williams, Jr. and Hank Williams, Sr. "There's a Tear in My Beer" [7]
1991 Chet Atkins and Mark Knopfler "Poor Boy Blues" [8]
1992 Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs, and Steve Wariner "Restless" [9]
1993 Marty Stuart and Travis Tritt "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" [10]
1994 Linda Davis and Reba McEntire "Does He Love You" [11]
1995 Aaron Neville and Trisha Yearwood "I Fall to Pieces" [2]
1996 Alison Krauss and Shenandoah "Somewhere in the Vicinity of the Heart" [12]
1997 Vince Gill and Alison Krauss & Union Station "High Lonesome Sound" [13]
1998 Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood "In Another's Eyes" [14]
1999 Clint Black, Joe Diffie, Merle Haggard, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Patty Loveless, Earl Scruggs, Ricky Skaggs, Marty Stuart, Pam Tillis, Randy Travis, Travis Tritt, and Dwight Yoakam "Same Old Train" [15]
2000 Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt "After the Gold Rush" [16]
2001 Faith Hill and Tim McGraw "Let's Make Love" [17]
2002 Harley Allen, Pat Enright, and Dan Tyminski (The Soggy Bottom Boys) "I Am a Man of Constant Sorrow" [18]
2003 Willie Nelson and Lee Ann Womack "Mendocino County Line" [19]
2004 Alison Krauss and James Taylor "How's the World Treating You" [20]
2005 Loretta Lynn and Jack White "Portland Oregon" [21]
2006 Faith Hill and Tim McGraw "Like We Never Loved at All" [22]
2007 Bon Jovi and Jennifer Nettles "Who Says You Can't Go Home" [23]
2008 Willie Nelson and Ray Price "Lost Highway" [24]
2009 Alison Krauss and Robert Plant "Killing the Blues" [25]
2010 Randy Travis and Carrie Underwood "I Told You So" [26]
2011 Alan Jackson and the Zac Brown Band "As She's Walking Away" [27]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also

References

General
  • "Past Winners Search". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved September 24, 2011. Note: User must select the "Country" category as the genre under the search feature.
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  2. ^ a b "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times. January 6, 1995. p. 4. Retrieved September 18, 2010.
  3. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on October 27, 2009. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  4. ^ "Explanation For Category Restructuring". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  5. ^ "U2 Up For 4 Grammys". The Charlotte Observer. January 15, 1988. p. 1B.
  6. ^ "Nominees for music's best". USA Today. January 13, 1989. p. 5D.
  7. ^ Jan DeKnock (February 16, 1990). "Who'll Win The Grammys? And the Grammy nominees are ...". Chicago Tribune. p. 37.
  8. ^ "And the Grammy nominees are ...". Chicago Tribune. February 15, 1991. p. 28.
  9. ^ "R.E.M., Adams Lead The Grammy Nomination Pack". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. January 9, 1992. p. B3.
  10. ^ Don McLeese (January 8, 1993). "Clapton leads Grammy nominations". Austin American-Statesman. p. 3.
  11. ^ "Hundreds Nominated For Grammys". Deseret News. Deseret News Publishing Company. January 10, 1994. p. 3. Retrieved September 18, 2011.
  12. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times. January 5, 1996. p. 4. Retrieved July 13, 2010.
  13. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times. January 8, 1997. p. 2. Retrieved July 13, 2010.
  14. ^ "1997 Grammy Nominees". Orlando Sentinel. January 9, 1998. p. 3. Retrieved July 13, 2010.
  15. ^ "Academy's Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times. January 6, 1999. p. 3. Retrieved July 13, 2010.
  16. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc (2000). "Final Nominations For The 42nd Annual Grammy Awards". Billboard. 112 (3): 72. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  17. ^ Boucher, Geoff (January 4, 2001). "Grammys Cast a Wider Net Than Usual". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  18. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS. January 4, 2002. Archived from the original on October 10, 2003. Retrieved March 19, 2011.
  19. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 3. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2011.
  20. ^ "Grammy Award Winners". The New York Times. 2004. Retrieved March 11, 2011.
  21. ^ "Grammy Award nominees in top categories". USA Today. February 7, 2005. Retrieved March 19, 2011.
  22. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times. December 8, 2005. p. 2. Retrieved March 20, 2011.
  23. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 8, 2006. p. 8. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved March 20, 2011.
  24. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominees". The New York Times. December 6, 2007. Retrieved March 20, 2011.
  25. ^ "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards Nominations". CBS. Archived from the original on February 14, 2009. Retrieved September 10, 2011.
  26. ^ "Nominees And Winners". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved March 20, 2011.
  27. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 20, 2011.

External links

As She's Walking Away

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Carnival Ride

Carnival Ride is the second studio album by American country music recording artist Carrie Underwood. It was released in the United States on October 23, 2007, by Arista Nashville. On this album, Underwood was more involved in the songwriting process; she set up a writers' retreat at Nashville's famed Ryman Auditorium to collaborate with such Music Row tunesmiths as Hillary Lindsey, Craig Wiseman, Rivers Rutherford, and Gordie Sampson.Carnival Ride debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling over 527,000 copies and achieving one of the biggest ever first-week sales by a female artist. It was the singer's first album to debut at number one on the Billboard 200 and second to debut atop the Top Country Albums chart. The album was certified quadruple platinum, it has sold 3.4 million copies in the United States, and four million copies worldwide.

Five singles were released from the album — "So Small", "All-American Girl", "Last Name", "Just a Dream", and "I Told You So". The first four of which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, thus making Underwood the first solo female artist to pull four number one's from one album since Shania Twain in 1995-1996. All singles were Top 30 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, with "I Told You So" climbing to number nine and both "So Small" and "Last Name" reaching the Top 20.

The album and its songs were largely praised by music critics. Underwood won two Grammy Awards - one for Best Female Country Vocal Performance for "Last Name", at the 2009 Grammy Awards, and one for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals for "I Told You So", at the 2010 Grammy Awards. Carnival Ride was nominated for Album of the Year at the Academy of Country Music Awards and Country Music Association Awards and won the American Music Award for Favorite Country Album, in 2008.

Clay Cook

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Dan Tyminski

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The song won them a Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals in 2001.

Its b-side, "There Will Come a Day", later charted at number 35 on Hot Country Songs in 2001, based on unsolicited airplay.

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A tale of coping with a love that has drifted away, the song provided the thematic opening for shows from McGraw and Hill's joint Soul2Soul II Tour 2006, with the pair singing it at opposite ends of the stage and with their backs to each other.

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Hill and McGraw won the Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals for the song, at the 48th Annual Grammy Awards, in 2006.

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Pamela Yvonne Tillis (born July 24, 1957) is an American country music singer-songwriter and actress. She is the daughter of the late country music singer Mel Tillis and Doris Tillis.

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Restless (Carl Perkins song)

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