Government of the 31st Dáil

The Government of the 31st Dáil is the previous Government of Ireland, formed after the 2011 general election to Dáil Éireann on 25 February 2011. Fine Gael entered into discussions with the Labour Party which culminated in a joint programme for government. The 31st Dáil first met on 9 March 2011 when it nominated Seán Barrett to be the Ceann Comhairle.[1] Following this, the house nominated Enda Kenny, the leader of Fine Gael, to be the 13th Taoiseach. Kenny then went to the Áras an Uachtaráin where President Mary McAleese appointed him as Taoiseach. On the nomination of the Taoiseach, and following the Dáil's approval the 29th Government of Ireland was appointed by the President.[2][3][4][5]

Government of the 31st Dáil
29th Government of Ireland
Enda Kenny EPP 2014 (cropped)
Date formed9 March 2011
Date dissolved10 March 2016
People and organisations
Head of stateMary McAleese (2011)
Michael D. Higgins (2011–16)
Head of governmentEnda Kenny
Deputy head of governmentEamon Gilmore (2011–14)
Joan Burton (2014–16)
No. of ministers15
Member partiesFine Gael
Labour Party
Status in legislatureMajority Coalition
Opposition cabinetFirst Martin front bench
Opposition partyFianna Fáil
Opposition leaderMicheál Martin
History
Election(s)2011 general election
Legislature term(s)31st Dáil
Budget(s)2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Outgoing formation2016 government formation
Predecessor28th Government
Successor30th Government

29th Government of Ireland

Irish Cabinet 2013
Members of the Government of the 31st Dáil

The 29th Government of Ireland (9 March 2011 – 10 March 2016) was composed of Fine Gael and the Labour Party.

Nomination of Taoiseach vote

9 March 2011
Nomination of Taoiseach vote for Enda Kenny (FG)

Motion proposed by Simon Harris and seconded by Ciara Conway
Absolute majority: 84/166
Vote Parties Votes
☑ Yes Fine Gael (76), Labour Party (37), Independent (5)
117 / 166
No Sinn Féin (14), Independent (8), People Before Profit Alliance (2), Socialist Party (2),
Workers and Unemployed Action Group (1)
27 / 166
Abstentions Fianna Fáil (20), Ceann Comhairle (1), Independent (1)
22 / 166
Source: Oireachtas Debates

Composition of the Government

The Ministers of the Government were approved by the Dáil on 9 March 2011.[6][7]

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Enda Kenny 2011–16 Fine Gael
Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade[8]
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan 2011–16 Fine Gael
Minister for Education and Skills Ruairi Quinn 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform[9] Brendan Howlin 2011–16
Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation[10] Richard Bruton Fine Gael
Minister for Social Protection Joan Burton Labour Party
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht[11] Jimmy Deenihan 2011–14 Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government[12] Phil Hogan Fine Gael
Minister for Justice and Equality[13] Alan Shatter 2011–14
Minister for Defence
Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine[14] Simon Coveney 2011–16
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs[15] Frances Fitzgerald 2011–14
Minister for Health[16] James Reilly
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport[17] Leo Varadkar

Changes May 2014

There was a reshuffle after the resignation of Alan Shatter.[18]

Minister for Justice and Equality Frances Fitzgerald 2014–16 Fine Gael
Minister for Defence Enda Kenny (acting) 2014
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Charles Flanagan 2014

Changes July 2014

Following the election of Joan Burton as Leader of the Labour Party, a cabinet reshuffle took place on 11 July 2014.[19]

Tánaiste Joan Burton 2014–16 Labour Party
Minister for Defence Simon Coveney Fine Gael
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs James Reilly Fine Gael
Minister for Health Leo Varadkar Fine Gael
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Charles Flanagan Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Alex White Labour Party
Minister for Education and Skills Jan O'Sullivan Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government Alan Kelly Labour Party
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Paschal Donohoe Fine Gael
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys Fine Gael

The following attended cabinet meetings, but did not have a vote:

Office Name Term Party
Attorney General Máire Whelan 2011–16 Labour Party
Government Chief Whip Paul Kehoe 2011–16 Fine Gael
Minister of State for Housing and Planning Jan O'Sullivan 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister of State for Business and Employment Ged Nash[20] 2014–16 Labour Party

Economic Management Council

The Economic Management Council was a cabinet subcommittee of senior ministers formed to co-ordinate the response to the Irish financial crisis and the government's dealings with the troika (European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund).[21] Its members were the Taoiseach, the Tánaiste, the Minister for Finance, and the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform.[22] It was supported by the Department of the Taoiseach, led by Dermot McCarthy.[21][23] Brigid Laffan compared it to a war cabinet.[24] Opposition parties suggested the Council represented a dangerous concentration of power.[25]

Following the formation of a government in 2016, Shane Ross, a member of the Government of the 32nd Dáil, confirmed in an address to the Dáil that the subcommittee would not form part of the new government. Ross told the Dáil on 6 May 2016: "I had a conversation last night with the Taoiseach. I was talking to him about Dáil reform and I asked him about an issue - a last point I had forgotten to ask about earlier - which was the abolition of the Economic Management Council. I thought it was going to be like one of these thorny topics which we had been through over the last few weeks. He told me okay, it is gone, that it had been needed for a particular time and it is not needed any more and I was to consider it gone. To me that was very encouraging because it meant that one of those obstacles to Dáil reform, one of those rather secretive bodies that had dictated to the Cabinet and to the Dáil the agenda of what came out to the country, was now a thing of the past."[26]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011: Election of Ceann Comhairle". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  2. ^ "Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011: Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  3. ^ Under Article 13.1.1º of the 1937 Constitution of Ireland, the Dáil nominates a person whom it instructs the President to appoint as Taoiseach. The Taoiseach, following his appointment, then nominates his ministerial team en bloc to the Dáil for approval, in accordance with Article 13.1.2º. If the Dáil duly approves the list, the President proceeds to appoint them. Though it is often said that the Taoiseach and government are elected by the Dáil that is technically incorrect. They only become ministers when the President appoints them and they receive their seal of office, not by means of the parliamentary vote, although the President's appointment is automatic when they have been duly approved.
  4. ^ "Enda Kenny reveals new Cabinet". RTÉ News. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.
  5. ^ "Taoiseach names new Cabinet". Irish Government News Service. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.
  6. ^ "Assignment of Departments of State" (PDF). Iris Oifigiúil. 15 March 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
  7. ^ "Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government | Wednesday, 9 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  8. ^ The Department of Foreign Affairs was renamed the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 246/2011 - Foreign Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  9. ^ The Department of Public Expenditure and Reform was established by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011 which was enacted on 19 July 2017. "Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011". Irish Statute Book. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  10. ^ The Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation was renamed the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 245/2011 - Enterprise, Trade and Innovation (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  11. ^ The Department of Tourism, Culture and Sport was renamed the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 220/2011 - Tourism, Culture and Sport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  12. ^ The Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government was renamed the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government with effect from 2 May 2011. "S.I. No. 193/2011 - Transport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 19 April 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  13. ^ The Department of Justice and Law Reform was renamed the Department of Justice and Equality with effect from 2 April 2011. "S.I. No. 138/2011 - Justice and Law Reform (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  14. ^ The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was renamed the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine with effect from 17 October 2011. "S.I. No. 455/2011 - Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 8 September 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  15. ^ The Department of Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs was renamed the Department of Children and Youth Affairs with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 214/2011 - Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  16. ^ The Department of Health and Children was renamed the Department of Health with effect from 4 June 2011. "S.I. No. 219/2011 - Health (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  17. ^ The Department of Transport was renamed the Department of Transport with effect from 2 April 2011. "S.I. No. 141/2011 - Transport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  18. ^ "Nomination of Member of Government: Motion | Thursday, 8 May 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  19. ^ "Nomination of Members of the Government: Motion | Friday, 11 July 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  20. ^ Nash is described as a "Super junior" minister, because unlike other Ministers of State, he attends cabinet meetings.
  21. ^ a b State's most senior civil servant to step down
  22. ^ "Economic Management Council". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  23. ^ "Cabinet Committee Meetings". Dáil debates. Oireachtas. 24 September 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  24. ^ Laffan, Brigid (28 August 2013). "Economic Management Council acts as a 'war cabinet' in Ireland's fight for survival". The Irish Times. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  25. ^ "Martin queries constitutionality of Economic Management Council". RTÉ News. 30 July 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  26. ^ "Dáil Debates: Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government: Motion (Continued)". oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
2011 Irish general election

The 2011 Irish general election took place on Friday 25 February to elect 166 Teachtaí Dála across 43 constituencies to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of Ireland's parliament, the Oireachtas. The Dáil was dissolved and the general election called by President Mary McAleese on 1 February, at the request of Taoiseach Brian Cowen. The electorate was given the task of choosing the members of the 31st Dáil, who met on 9 March 2011 to nominate a Taoiseach and ratify the ministers of the Government of the 31st Dáil.

Cowen had previously announced on 20 January that the election would be held on 11 March, and that after the 2011 budget had been passed he would seek a dissolution of the 30th Dáil by the President. However, the Green Party, the junior party in coalition government with Cowen's Fianna Fáil, withdrew from government on 23 January, stating that it would support only a truncated finance bill from the opposition benches, in order to force an earlier election. On 24 January, Finance Minister Brian Lenihan Jnr reached an agreement with the opposition in Dáil Éireann to complete all stages of passing the finance bill in both houses of the Oireachtas by 29 January—following which the Dáil was to be dissolved immediately. Constitutionally, following a Dáil dissolution, an election must be held within 30 days.Following the collapse of the coalition, the then minority governing party, Fianna Fáil, sought to minimise its losses following historically low poll ratings in the wake of the Irish financial crisis. Fine Gael sought to gain a dominant position in Irish politics after poor results in the 2000s, and to replace Fianna Fáil for the first time since 1927 as the largest party in Dáil Éireann. The Labour Party hoped to make gains from both sides, and was widely expected to become the second-largest party and to enter into coalition government with Fine Gael; its highest ambition at the start of the campaign, buoyed by record poll ratings in preceding months, was to become the leading partner in government for the first time in the party's 99-year history. The Green Party, having been in coalition with Fianna Fáil during the Government of the 30th Dáil, faced stiff competition to retain its seats and was expected to lose at least four of its six seats. Sinn Féin was expected to make gains, encouraged by a by-election victory in November 2010 and by opinion polls which placed it ahead of Fianna Fáil. Some other left-wing groups, including People Before Profit, Workers and Unemployed Action and the Socialist Party, contested the general election under a joint banner, the United Left Alliance.Fianna Fáil was swept from power in the worst defeat of a sitting government since the formation of the Irish state in 1922. Fianna Fáil lost more than half of its first-preference vote from 2007, and garnered only 20 seats. It was the third-largest party in the 31st Dáil, after the first election since that of September 1927 out of which it had not emerged the largest party in the chamber. The Irish Times, Ireland's newspaper of record, described Fianna Fáil's meltdown as "defeat on a historic scale." Fine Gael won 76 seats to become the largest party in the Dáil for the first time in its 78-year history, while the Labour Party became the second largest party with 37 seats, and Sinn Féin also increased its number of seats. Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny became Taoiseach, in a coalition with Labour.

2013 in Irish television

The following is a list of events relating to television in Ireland from 2013.

Coalition government

A coalition government in a parliamentary system is a form of government in which multiple political parties cooperate, reducing the dominance of any one party within that "coalition". The usual reason for this arrangement is that no party on its own can achieve a majority in the parliament. A coalition government might also be created in a time of national difficulty or crisis (for example, during wartime or economic crisis) to give a government the high degree of perceived political legitimacy or collective identity it desires while also playing a role in diminishing internal political strife. In such times, parties have formed all-party coalitions (national unity governments, grand coalitions). If a coalition collapses, a confidence vote is held or a motion of no confidence is taken.

Constitutional Convention (Ireland)

The Convention on the Constitution (Irish: An Coinbhinsiún ar an mBunreacht) was established in Ireland in 2012 to discuss proposed amendments to the Constitution of Ireland. More commonly called simply the Constitutional Convention, it met for the first time 1 December 2012 and sat until 31 March 2014. It had 100 members: a chairman; 29 members of the Oireachtas (parliament); four representatives of Northern Ireland political parties; and 66 randomly selected citizens of Ireland.

The Convention was mandated to consider eight specified issues, and also selected two others to discuss. The government was not obliged to proceed with any amendment proposal, but committed to respond formally to each recommendation and debate it in the Oireachtas. As of December 2018, the government had formally responded to all nine of the Convention's reports, and put three of its proposals to referendum. Two of those referendums took place on 22 May 2015: to mandate legal same-sex marriage and to reduce the age of eligibility for the presidency from 35 to 21. The former was accepted, and the latter rejected. A third referendum was passed on 26 October 2018 to remove the offence of blasphemy from the Constitution.

Fine Gael

Fine Gael ( FEE-nə GAYL, FIN-ə -⁠, Irish: [ˌfʲɪnʲə ˈɡeːl̪ˠ]; English: "Family (or Tribe) of the Irish") is a liberal-conservative political party in Ireland. Fine Gael is currently the governing and largest party in Ireland in terms of members of the Oireachtas and Irish members of the European Parliament. The party has a membership of 21,000 and is the senior partner governing in a minority coalition with several independent politicians, with party leader Leo Varadkar serving as Taoiseach. Varadkar succeeded Enda Kenny as party leader on 2 June 2017 and as Taoiseach on 14 June; Kenny had been leader since 2002, and Taoiseach since 2011.Fine Gael was founded on 8 September 1933 following the merger of its parent party Cumann na nGaedheal, the National Centre Party and the National Guard. Its origins lie in the struggle for Irish independence and the pro-Treaty side in the Irish Civil War and Michael Collins, in particular, is often identified as the founder of the movement.Fine Gael is generally considered to be more of a proponent of market liberalism than its traditional rival, Fianna Fáil. However, apart from brief minority governments (as in 1987), Fine Gael has rarely governed Ireland without a coalition that also included the Labour Party, a social-democratic, centre-left party. Fine Gael describes itself as a "party of the progressive centre" which it defines as acting "in a way that is right for Ireland, regardless of dogma or ideology". It lists its core values as "equality of opportunity, free enterprise and reward, security, integrity and hope." It is strongly in favour of the European Union and opposed to physical force Irish republicanism. The party's youth wing, Young Fine Gael, was formed in 1977, and has approximately four thousand members. Fine Gael is a founding member of the European People's Party.

Government of the Dáil

Government of the Dáil may refer to

Government of the 1st Dáil

Government of the 2nd Dáil

Government of the 3rd Dáil

Government of the 4th Dáil

Government of the 5th Dáil

Government of the 6th Dáil

Government of the 7th Dáil

Government of the 8th Dáil

Government of the 9th Dáil

Government of the 10th Dáil

Government of the 11th Dáil

Government of the 12th Dáil

Government of the 13th Dáil

Government of the 14th Dáil

Government of the 15th Dáil

Government of the 16th Dáil

Government of the 17th Dáil

Government of the 18th Dáil

Government of the 19th Dáil

Government of the 20th Dáil

Government of the 21st Dáil

Government of the 22nd Dáil

Government of the 23rd Dáil

Government of the 24th Dáil

Government of the 25th Dáil

Government of the 26th Dáil

Government of the 27th Dáil (disambiguation), two governments by that name

Government of the 28th Dáil

Government of the 29th Dáil

Government of the 30th Dáil

Government of the 31st Dáil

Labour Party (Ireland)

The Labour Party (Irish: Páirtí an Lucht Oibre) is a social-democratic political party in the Republic of Ireland. Founded in 1912 in Clonmel, County Tipperary, by James Larkin, James Connolly, and William X. O'Brien as the political wing of the Irish Trades Union Congress, it describes itself as a "democratic socialist party" in its constitution. Labour continues to be the political arm of the Irish trade union and labour movement and seeks to represent workers' interests in the Dáil and on a local level.

Unlike the other main Irish political parties, Labour did not arise as a faction of the original Sinn Féin party (although it incorporated Democratic Left in 1999, a party that did trace its origins back to Sinn Féin). The party has served as a partner in coalition governments on seven occasions since its formation: six times in coalition either with Fine Gael alone or with Fine Gael and other smaller parties, and once with Fianna Fáil. This gives Labour a cumulative total of nineteen years served as part of a government, the second-longest total of any party in the Republic of Ireland after Fianna Fáil. The current party leader is Brendan Howlin. It is currently the fourth-largest party in Dáil Éireann, with seven seats.

In November 2018, Labour announced that they were considering running candidates again in Northern Ireland, in response to a potential merger between Fianna Fáil and the Social Democratic and Labour Party, with whom Labour have long had fraternal links. The last time Labour had contested elections in the region was in 1973, shortly after the SDLP's formation.The Labour Party is a member of the Progressive Alliance, Socialist International, and Party of European Socialists (PES).

Members of the 24th Seanad

This is a list of the members of the 24th Seanad Éireann, the upper house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. These Senators were elected on 27 April 2011 after postal voting closed. The Taoiseach's nominees were announced on 20 May 2011. The Seanad election took place 60 days after the 2011 general election for the Dáil. The 24th Seanad first met at Leinster House on 25 May 2011. Paddy Burke was elected as the new Cathaoirleach of the Seanad.

Members of the 31st Dáil

This is a list of members who were elected to the 31st Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. These TDs (Members of Parliament) were elected at the 2011 general election on 25 February 2011. On the advice of President Mary McAleese, the newly elected Dáil Éireann convened at midday on 9 March 2011 in Leinster House. It was dissolved by President Michael D. Higgins on the request of Taoiseach Enda Kenny on 3 February 2016.The 2011 election saw 17 Dáil constituencies return 3 TDs each, 15 constituencies return 4 TDs each and 11 constituencies return 5 TDs each, for a total of 166. Seán Barrett was elected as Ceann Comhairle in the first sitting of the Dáil. Fine Gael, led by Enda Kenny, became the largest party for the first time, though without an overall majority. Fine Gael formed a coalition government with the Labour Party, led by Eamon Gilmore, who had achieved their highest number of seats in the party's history. In July 2014, Joan Burton won a Labour Party leadership election to become the Leader of the Labour Party and Tánaiste.

Fianna Fáil secured 20 seats, the lowest in the party's history, and was the largest party in opposition. The leader of the party, Micheál Martin became the Leader of the Opposition. Gerry Adams as leader of Sinn Féin became the second opposition leader. A technical group was formed following the election composed of 16 independent politicians and members of the United Left Alliance, who failed to win enough seats to gain speaking rights.Almost half of the members of the 30th Dáil were absent from the 31st: 31 members retired before the poll and a further 45 sitting TDs lost their seats at the election. 76 new TDs were elected to the Dáil, 46% of the total.

Ministers of State of the 31st Dáil

This is a list of Ministers of State of the 31st Dáil. On 9 March 2011, the 29th Government of Ireland was nominated by Dáil Éireann on the advice of the Taoiseach, and then appointed by the President. The Fine Gael–Labour Party coalition was led by the Taoiseach, Enda Kenny.

On that day Kenny announced to the Dáil that he would appoint Paul Kehoe, TD to the post of Minister for State at the Department of the Taoiseach with special responsibility as Government Chief Whip and Minister of State at the Department of Defence. Willie Penrose, TD was appointed on the same date to the position of Minister of State at the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government. On 10 March 2011, 13 other ministerial appointments were announced.

Kenny Cabinet (2011–2016)
Ministry of Dáil Éireann (1919–22)
Provisional Government of Ireland (1922)
Executive Council of the Irish Free State (1922–37)
Government of Ireland (1937–present)

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