Gordon R. Dickson

Gordon Rupert Dickson (November 1, 1923 – January 31, 2001) was a Canadian-American science fiction writer. He was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000.[1]

Gordon Rupert Dickson
Dickson lecturing at Minicon in 1974
Dickson lecturing at Minicon in 1974
BornNovember 1, 1923
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
DiedJanuary 31, 2001 (aged 77)
Richfield, Minnesota, United States
OccupationWriter
NationalityCanadian American
Period1950–2001
GenreScience fiction, fantasy
Notable worksChilde Cycle

Biography

Dickson was born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1923. After the death of his father, he moved with his mother to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1937.[2] He served in the United States Army, from 1943 to 1946, and received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota, in 1948. From 1948 through 1950 he attended the University of Minnesota for graduate work. His first published speculative fiction was the short story "Trespass!", written jointly with Poul Anderson, in the Spring 1950 issue of Fantastic Stories Quarterly (ed. Sam Merwin), the inaugural number of Fantastic Story Magazine as it came to be titled. Next year three of his solo efforts were published by John W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction and one appeared in Planet Stories. Anderson and Dickson also inaugurated the Hoka series with "The Sheriff of Canyon Gulch" (Other Worlds Science Stories, May 1951).[3]

Dickson's series of novels include the Childe Cycle and the Dragon Knight. He won three Hugo awards and one Nebula award.

For a great part of his life, he suffered from the effects of asthma. He died of complications from severe asthma.[4]

Character as an author

John Clute has characterized Dickson as a "gregarious, engaging, genial, successful man of letters", who had not been an introvert.[5] Clute considers Dickson a science fiction romantic.[5] Nevertheless, Clute stresses in connection to Dickson that science fiction welcomes "images of heightened solitude, romantically vague, limitless landscapes, and an anguished submission to afflatus", due to its origin in Gothic fiction.[2]

Style

Clute points out that Dickson, like Poul Anderson, with whom he collaborated in the Hoka series, "[tends] to infuse an austere Nordic pathos into wooded, rural midwestern American settings".[5] His works often have mercenaries as their protagonists and deal with aliens that are "less deracinated and more lovable than humans" (Clute).[5] They "are inclined to take on a heightened, sagalike complexion" (Clute),[5] particularly through the insertion of lyric poetry that is sometimes rather inferior.[5]

Selected works

Childe Cycle

Dragon Knight series

  1. The Dragon and the George (1976)
  2. The Dragon Knight (1990)
  3. The Dragon on the Border (1992)
  4. The Dragon at War (1992)
  5. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll (1994)
  6. The Dragon and the Djinn (1996)
  7. The Dragon and the Gnarly King (1997)
  8. The Dragon in Lyonesse (1998)
  9. The Dragon and the Fair Maid of Kent (2000)

Hoka series

Novels

  • Alien from Arcturus (1956) (expanded as Arcturus Landing)
  • Mankind on the Run (1956) (variant title: On the Run, 1979)
  • Time to Teleport (1960)
  • Naked to the Stars (1961)
  • Spacial Delivery (1961)
  • Delusion World (1961)
  • The Alien Way (1965)
  • The Space Winners (1965)
  • Mission to Universe (1965) (rev. 1977)
  • The Space Swimmers (1967)
  • Planet Run (1967) (with Keith Laumer)
  • Spacepaw (1969)
  • Wolfling (1969)
  • None But Man (1969)
  • Hour of the Horde (1970)
  • Sleepwalkers’ World (1971)
  • The Outposter (1972)
  • The Pritcher Mass (1972)
  • Alien Art (1973)
  • The R-Master (1973) (revised as The Last Master, 1984)
  • Gremlins, Go Home (1974) (with Ben Bova)
  • The Lifeship (variant title: Lifeboat) (1977) (with Harry Harrison)
  • Time Storm (1977)
  • The Far Call (1978)
  • Home from the Shore (1978)
  • Pro (1978) (illustrated by James R. Odbert) (Ace Illustrated Novel)
  • Masters of Everon (1980)
  • The Last Master (1984)
  • Jamie the Red (1984) (with Roland Green)
  • The Forever Man (1986)
  • Way of the Pilgrim (1987)
  • The Earth Lords (1989)
  • Wolf and Iron (1990)
  • The Magnificent Wilf (1995)
  • The Right to Arm Bears (2000) omnibus of Spacial Delivery, Spacepaw, "The Law-Twister Shorty"

Short story collections

Fantastic 196010
Dickson's novelette "The Seats of Hell", cover-featured on the May 1959 issue of Fantastic, was collected in Beginnings
Galaxy 196302
Dickson's novelette "Home from the Shore", cover-featured on the February 1963 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction, was collected in Mutants

Children's books

  • Secret under the Sea (1960)
  • Secret under Antarctica (1963)
  • Secret under the Caribbean (1964)
  • Secrets of the Deep (1985) omnibus of the three above

Awards

Dickson received the 1977 Skylark —Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction from NESFA— for his contribution to SF[6] and he was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000.[1]

He won several annual literary awards for particular works.[6]

Hugo Award
  • "Soldier, Ask Not" for best short story, 1965
  • "Lost Dorsai" for best novella, 1981
  • "The Cloak and the Staff" for best novelette, 1981
Nebula Award
  • "Call Him Lord" for best novelette, 1966
August Derleth Award (best novel, British Fantasy Society)

References

  1. ^ a b "Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame" Archived 2013-05-21 at the Wayback Machine.. Mid American Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions, Inc. Retrieved 2013-03-22. This was the official website of the Hall of Fame to 2004.
  2. ^ a b John Clute: Gordon R. Dickson (1923–). In: Richard Bleiler (ed.): Science Fiction Writers. Critical Studies of the Major Authors from the Early Nineteenth Century to the Present Day. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York 1982, p. 345
  3. ^ a b Gordon R. Dickson at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-22. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  4. ^ "Gordon R. Dickson -- Science Fiction Writer, 77". The New York Times. February 16, 2001. Retrieved April 1, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f John Clute: Gordon R. Dickson (1923–). In: Richard Bleiler (ed.): Science Fiction Writers. Critical Studies of the Major Authors from the Early Nineteenth Century to the Present Day. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York 1982, p. 346
  6. ^ a b "Dickson, Gordon R." Archived 2012-10-16 at the Wayback Machine.. The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
Citations

External links

42nd World Science Fiction Convention

The 42nd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as L.A.con II, was held August 30–September 3, 1984, at the Anaheim Hilton and the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California, United States.

The chairmen were Craig Miller and Milt Stevens. The Guests of Honor were Gordon R. Dickson (pro) and Dick Eney (fan).

Robert Bloch was the Toastmaster for the Hugo Ceremony, and Jerry Pournelle was the Master of Ceremonies for the Other Awards Ceremony. Total attendance was 8,365, a record and the largest to date.

Dorsai!

Dorsai! is the first published book of the incomplete Childe Cycle series of science fiction novels by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. Later books are set both before and after the events in Dorsai!.

The novel was originally published in serialized form in Astounding Science Fiction, starting in May 1959. A shorter, revised version was published in paperback by Ace in 1960 under the title The Genetic General. A re-edited and expanded version of the novel was published under its original serialized title, Dorsai!, by DAW in 1976. This version of the novel was reissued as one half of an omnibus edition, Dorsai Spirit by Tor in 2002. The other novel contained in Dorsai Spirit is The Spirit of Dorsai (originally published 1979).

Earthman's Burden

Earthman's Burden is a collection of science fiction stories by American writers Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Gnome Press in 1957. The story "Don Jones" was original to this collection. The other stories originally appeared in the magazines Other Worlds, Universe and Fantasy and Science Fiction.

The stories involve a teddy bear-like alien race known as Hokas, and spoof a variety of fictional genres.

Edward E. Smith Memorial Award

The Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, or "Skylark", annually recognizes someone for lifetime contributions to science fiction, "both through work in the field and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late "Doc" Smith well-loved by those who knew him." It is presented by the New England Science Fiction Association at its annual convention, Boskone, to someone chosen by a vote of NESFA members. The trophy is a large lens mounted on a simple plinth.The award was inaugurated in 1966, the year after Smith's death. Fifty-one people have been honored in 49 years to 2015 (Hal Clement received the award twice, in 1969 and 1997).

Skylark recipients

Gordon R. Dickson bibliography

The complete bibliography of Gordon R. Dickson.

Hoka!

Hoka! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writers Poul Anderson and Gordon Dickson. It was first published by Wallaby in 1983. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction and Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

In the Bone

In the Bone: The Best Science Fiction of Gordon R. Dickson is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Ace Books in 1987 and expands Dickson's earlier collection, Gordon R. Dickson's SF Best. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Satellite and If.

Lost Dorsai

Lost Dorsai is a science fiction novella by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novella in 1981 and was also nominated for the Nebula Award in 1980.

Lost Dorsai (short story collection)

Lost Dorsai is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson from his Childe Cycle series. It was first published by Ace Books in 1980. The collection includes two stories that originally appeared in the anthology series Destinies, one that appeared in the magazine Analog Science Fiction and Fact and an excerpt from Dickson's novel The Final Encyclopedia.

Mindspan

Mindspan is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1986. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Venture, Startling Stories, Galaxy Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction and Fact and Worlds of Tomorrow.

Stories 4 to 8 were republished in The Magnificent Wilf (1995).

Mutants (short story collection)

Mutants is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Macmillan in 1970. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Astounding, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Galaxy Science Fiction and Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Necromancer (novel)

Necromancer is a science fiction novel by American writer Gordon R. Dickson, published in 1962. It was alternatively titled No Room for Man between 1963 and 1974 before reverting to its original title. It is the prequel to Dickson's earlier novel Dorsai!.

Soldier, Ask Not

Soldier, Ask Not is a science fiction novel by American writer Gordon R. Dickson, published in 1967 by Dell Publishing company. It is also the title of a short story, appeared in the October, 1964 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine. The shorter work constitutes about one third of the novel.

It is part of Dickson's Childe Cycle series, in which mankind has reached the stars and divided into specialized splinter groups. It takes place at roughly the same time as Dorsai!, and a few characters appear in both books. Themes from the rest of the cycle are echoed here, particularly the actions of a key person, like Paul Formain, Cletus Grahame and Donal Graeme in the other novels, who can drastically affect history due to his ability to analyze and influence the behavior of others. Unlike the other protagonists, however, Tam Olyn is no hero.

Steel Brother

Steel Brother is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Tor Books in 1985 and reprints most of the stories from Dickson's 1984 collection Dickson!, with one substitution and one added interview. The stories originally appeared in the magazines SFWA Bulletin, Astounding, Galaxy Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Science Fiction Stories. The book contains the introduction to each story by Sandra Miesel from the previous collection, though they are not credited.

Survival!

Survival! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1984. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Astounding, Fantasy and Science Fiction, If, Imagination, Fantastic, Infinity Science Fiction, Future and Venture

The Cloak and the Staff

"The Cloak and the Staff" is a science fiction novelette by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novelette in 1981.

The Dragon and the George

The Dragon and the George is a 1976 fantasy novel by American writer Gordon R. Dickson, the first in his "Dragon Knight" series. A shorter form of the story was previously published as the short story, "St. Dragon and the George" in the September 1957 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.

The novel was loosely adapted into the 1982 animated movie The Flight of Dragons by Rankin/Bass.

The Spirit of Dorsai

The Spirit of Dorsai is a collection of two science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Ace Books in 1979. The collection includes linking material and the stories are part of Dickson's Childe Cycle. The first story, "Amanda Morgan", is original to this collection. The other, "Brothers", originally appeared in the anthology Astounding, edited by Harry Harrison.

The Stranger (short story collection)

The Stranger is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Tor Books in 1987. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Satellite, Imagination, Astounding, Saturn, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Fantastic, Science Fiction Stories, Future and If.

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