Gordon Eklund

Gordon Eklund (born July 24, 1945 in Seattle, Washington) is an American science fiction author whose works include the "Lord Tedric" series and two of the earliest original novels based on the 1960s Star Trek TV series. He has written under the pen name Wendell Stewart, and in one instance under the name of the late E. E. "Doc" Smith.

Eklund's first published SF short story, "Dear Aunt Annie", ran in the April 1970 issue of Fantastic magazine and was nominated for a Nebula Award. Eklund won the Nebula for Best Novelette for the 1974 short story "If the Stars Are Gods", co-written with Gregory Benford. The two expanded the story into a full-length novel of the same title, published in 1977.

Eklund's Star Trek novel The Starless World was the first Star Trek story about a Dyson sphere.

In his teens, Eklund was a member of a Seattle SF fan club, The Nameless Ones, and in 1977, Eklund was a guest of honor at the 1977 SF convention Bubonicon 9, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Cushing Memorial Library of Texas A&M University has a "Gordon Eklund Collection" housing the typed manuscript of the story "The Stuff of Time".

Eklund has retired from a long career with the U.S. Postal Service, and is considering writing full-time again. He's a member of the Fantasy Amateur Press Association and the Spectator Amateur Press Society.

Bibliography

Novels

  • The Eclipse of Dawn (1971)
  • A Trace of Dreams (1972)
  • Beyond the Resurrection (1973)
  • Inheritors of the Earth (1974) (with Poul Anderson)
  • All Times Possible (1974)
  • Serving in Time also known as Laser Books No. 6: Serving in Time (Laser Books, 1975, ISBN 0-373-72006-8)
  • Falling Toward Forever also known as Laser Books No. 10. Falling Toward Forever (Laser Books, 1975, ISBN 0-373-72010-6)
  • Dance of the Apocalypse also known as Laser Books No. 46. Dance of the Apocalypse (Laser Books, 1976, ISBN 0-373-72046-7)
  • The Grayspace Beast (1976)
  • If the Stars Are Gods (1977) (with Gregory Benford)
  • Twilight River (1979)
  • The Garden of Winter (1980)
  • Find the Changeling (1980) (with Gregory Benford)
  • A Thunder on Neptune (1989)

Lord Tedric series

Series conceived by E. E. "Doc" Smith

  • Lord Tedric (Baronet hardcover, June 1978, ISBN 0-89437-021-9; Ace Books paperback, November 1978, ISBN 0-441-49255-X)
  • Space Pirates also known as Lord Tedric No. 2: Space Pirates (Ace Books, March 1980, ISBN 0-441-77760-0)
  • Black Knight of the Iron Sphere also known as Lord Tedric III: Black Knight of the Iron Sphere (Ace Books, June 1981, ISBN 0-441-49256-8)
  • Alien Realms (Star Books, November 1980, ISBN 0-352-30770-6) as E. E. "Doc" Smith

Star Trek

  • The Starless World also known as Star Trek Adventures 3: The Starless World (Bantam Books, November 1978, ISBN 0-553-24675-5)
  • Devil World also known as Star Trek Adventures 8: Devil World (Bantam Books, November 1979, ISBN 0-553-24677-1)

Anthologies with Eklund stories

  • Universe 1 (1971)
  • Universe 2 (1972)
  • The Best Science Fiction of the Year 2 (1973)
  • Chains of the Sea (1973)
  • Universe 3 (1973)
  • Universe 4 (1974)
  • The Best Science Fiction of the Year 4 (1975)
  • Nebula Award Stories 10 (1975)
  • Universe 6 (1976)
  • Universe 8 (1978)
  • The Best Science Fiction of the Year 8 (1979)
  • Beyond Reality (1979)
  • Binary Star, No. 2 (Dell Publishing, 1979, ISBN 0-440-11090-4)
  • First Contact (1987)
  • The Science Fiction Century (1996)

Short stories include

  • "Dear Aunt Annie" (Fantastic, April 1970)
  • "West Wind, Falling" (1971) (with Gregory Benford)
  • "Gemini Cavendish" (Amazing Stories, March 1971)
  • "To End All Wars" (Amazing Stories, November 1971)
  • "Grasshopper Time" (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March 1972)
  • "Stalking the Sun" (1972)
  • "Free City Blues" (1973)
  • "The Shrine of Sebastian" (Chains of the Sea, 1973)
  • "The Ascending Aye" (Amazing Stories, January 1973)
  • "The Beasts in the Jungle" (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November 1973)
  • "Moby, Too" (Amazing Stories, December 1973)
  • "If the Stars Are Gods" (1974) (with Gregory Benford)
  • "Tattered Stars, Tarnished Bars" (1974)
  • "What Did You Do Last Year?" (1976) (with Gregory Benford)
  • "Hellas Is Florida" (with Gregory Benford) (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Jan. 1977)
  • "Vermeer's Window" (1978)
  • "Objects Unidentified" (Flying)" (1997)
  • "The Cross Road Blues" (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, February 1999)
  • "Sense of Wonder" (Astonishing Trapdoor Stories #22; fanzine published mid-2003)
  • "I Said I Was Sorry Didnt I" (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Mar./Apr. 2014)

Awards

  • 1971 Nebula (nomination) - Novelette "Dear Aunt Annie"
  • 1975 Nebula - Novelette winner (1975) "If the Stars Are Gods" (with Gregory Benford)

Quotes

Ted White, The WSFA Journal, September 2003: "Eklund is a major SF writer of long-standing (he was first professionally published in 1970), but he was a fan of some note for the decade that preceded his professional debut. In recent years he's combined the two to write fanfiction. 'Fanfiction' is defined here as 'fiction about fans'; this is its original definition and it still flourishes. ... Most of Gordon's previous pieces of fanfiction (all published in fanzines over the past 10 or more years) have been short and ironic." [1]

External links

Ace Science Fiction Specials

Ace Science Fiction Specials are three series of science fiction and fantasy books published by Ace Books between 1968 and 1990. Terry Carr edited the first and third series, taking the "TV special" concept and adapting it to paperback marketing. The first series was one of the most influential in the history of science fiction publishing; four of the six novels nominated for 1970 Nebula Awards were from the series.

The date given is the year of publication by Ace; some are first editions and some are reprints. Also given is the Ace serial number. The serial number given is that of the first printing in the Ace Special series (except for the reissue of Rite of Passage). Books with a previous first edition are noted as "reissue" below. The order listed for series one is the original order of publication; the price is given. Ace reissued many of these books outside of the Ace Special line with different covers and prices, and sometimes different paginations. Award winners are noted; many were nominated for awards.

Comets (anthology)

Comets is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh as the fourth volume in their Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction series. It was first published in paperback by Signet/New American Library in February 1986.The book collects twenty novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by Asimov.

Fantastic (magazine)

Fantastic was an American digest-size fantasy and science fiction magazine, published from 1952 to 1980. It was founded by the publishing company Ziff Davis as a fantasy companion to Amazing Stories. Early sales were good, and the company quickly decided to switch Amazing from pulp format to digest, and to cease publication of their other science fiction pulp, Fantastic Adventures. Within a few years sales fell, and Howard Browne, the editor, was forced to switch the focus to science fiction rather than fantasy. Browne lost interest in the magazine as a result and the magazine generally ran poor-quality fiction in the mid-1950s, under Browne and his successor, Paul W. Fairman.

At the end of the 1950s, Cele Goldsmith took over as editor of both Fantastic and Amazing Stories, and quickly invigorated the magazines, bringing in many new writers and making them, in the words of one science fiction historian, the "best-looking and brightest" magazines in the field. Goldsmith helped to nurture the early careers of writers such as Roger Zelazny and Ursula K. Le Guin, but was unable to increase circulation, and in 1965 the magazines were sold to Sol Cohen, who hired Joseph Wrzos as editor and switched to a reprint-only policy. This was financially successful, but brought Cohen into conflict with the newly formed Science Fiction Writers of America. After a turbulent period at the end of the 1960s, Ted White became editor and the reprints were phased out.

White worked hard to make the magazine successful, introducing artwork from artists who had made their names in comics, and working with new authors such as Gordon Eklund. His budget for fiction was low, but he was occasionally able to find good stories from well-known writers that had been rejected by other markets. Circulation continued to decline, however, and in 1978, Cohen sold out his half of the business to his partner, Arthur Bernhard. White resigned shortly afterwards, and was replaced by Elinor Mavor, but within two years Bernhard decided to close down Fantastic, merging it with Amazing Stories, which had always enjoyed a slightly higher circulation.

Gregory Benford bibliography

A bibliography of works by American science fiction author Gregory Benford.

Habakkuk (fanzine)

Habakkuk was a science fiction fanzine edited by Bill Donaho. It was nominated for the 1961, 1967 and 1995 Hugo Awards for Best Fanzine.Habakkuk (named after the editor's cat) was published in three phases, which Donaho referred to as "Chapters". Chapter I consisted of six issues (referred to as "Verses") published from February 1960 to July 1961, included illustrations by Trina Robbins, Bjo Trimble, Bill Rotsler, and George Metzger; and articles by Donaho, Art Castillo, Ray Nelson, Ted White, rich brown and Kris Neville. This version earned Habakkuk its first Hugo nomination. Chapter II was three issues and ran from May 1966 to February 1967 in FAPA. It included art by Steve Stiles, and articles by Donaho, Castillo, White, Nelson, Alva Rogers, Colin Cameron and Gordon Eklund. This "Chapter" earned Donaho a nomination for the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer, and a second Hugo nomination for Habakkuk. Chapter III consisted of four issues from Fall 1993 (an 8-page "con report" on Confrancisco) to Fall 1994. The final Chapter included a cover by Robbins (by then mostly known for her work as an underground cartoonist), articles by White, and book reviews by Deb Notkin. This iteration of Habakkuk earned it its third Hugo nomination.

If the Stars are Gods

If the Stars are Gods is a science fiction novel by American writers Gregory Benford and Gordon Eklund, published in 1977. It is an expansion of the Nebula Award-winning short story, first published in Universe 4 (1974).

Laser Books

Laser Books was a line of 58 paperback science fiction (SF) novels published from 1975 to 1977 by Canadian romance powerhouse Harlequin Books. Laser published three titles per month, available by subscription as well as in stores. The books were limited to 50,000-60,000 words. They were numbered as a series, though each was a standalone novel. All the covers were painted by Hugo Award winning artist Kelly Freas.

New Dimensions 3

New Dimensions 3 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Robert Silverberg, the third in a series of twelve. It was first published in hardcover by Nelson Doubleday/SFBC in October 1973, with a paperback edition under the variant title New Dimensions III following from Signet/New American Library in February 1974.The book collects eleven novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by the editor.

New Dimensions II

New Dimensions II: Eleven Original Science Fiction Stories is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by American writer Robert Silverberg, the second in a series of twelve. It was first published in hardcover by Doubleday in December 1972, with a paperback edition under the variant title New Dimensions 2 following from Avon Books in December 1974.The book collects eleven novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by the editor.

Quark/1

Quark/1 is a 1970 anthology of short stories and poetry edited by Samuel R. Delany and Marilyn Hacker. It is the first anthology in the Quark series. The stories and poems are original to this anthology.

Quark/3

Quark/3 is a 1971 anthology of science fiction short stories and poetry edited by Samuel R. Delany and Marilyn Hacker. It is the third volume in the Quark series. The stories and poems are original to this anthology.

Rachel in Love

"Rachel in Love" is a 1987 science fiction short story by American writer Pat Murphy. It was first published in Asimov's Science Fiction.

San Diego Lightfoot Sue

"San Diego Lightfoot Sue" is a 1975 fantasy short story by Tom Reamy. It was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Star Trek (Bantam Books)

James Blish and J.A. Lawrence adapted episodes of Star Trek for Bantam Books from 1967 to 1978. The short stories were collected into twelve volumes, and published as a series of the same name. A thirteenth volume (originally titled Mudd's Angels) incorporated two episode adaptations and an original novella. The adaptations were generally based on draft scripts, often containing additional plot elements or differing situations from the completed televised episodes.

A range of thirteen original novels, two short story anthologies, and a bestselling reference book on the Star Trek fandom followed. Bantam also produced a line of "fotonovels" that adapted popular episodes of the television series using images from the episodes.

Since 1979, the majority of Star Trek tie-in fiction and reference material has been published by Simon & Schuster imprint Pocket Books.

The Queen of Air and Darkness (novella)

"The Queen of Air and Darkness" is a science fiction novella by American writer Poul Anderson, set in his History of Rustum fictional universe. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novella and the Locus Award for Best Short Story in 1972, and the Nebula Award for Best Novelette in 1971.

The Starless World

The Starless World is a Star Trek novel involving a Dyson Sphere. It contains the canonical character James T. Kirk. It was written by Gordon Eklund. It was originally published by Bantam Books in 1978. ISBN 1-85286-505-9

Universe 6

Universe 6 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the sixth volume in the seventeen-volume Universe anthology series. It was first published in hardcover by Doubleday in April 1976, with a paperback edition following from Popular Library in August 1977, and a British hardcover edition from Dennis Dobson in 1978.The book collects seven novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors.

Universe 8

Universe 8 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the eighth volume in the seventeen-volume Universe anthology series. It was first published in hardcover by Doubleday in May 1978, with a paperback edition from Popular Library in July 1979, and a British hardcover edition from Dennis Dobson in July 1979.The book collects eight novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors.

What We Found

"What We Found" is a science fiction novelette by Geoff Ryman, first published in 2011, in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. It won the 2012 Nebula Award for Best Novelette, and was nominated for the 2012 Hugo Award for Best Novelette. It was included in The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Ninth Annual Collection by Gardner Dozois.

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