Gordini

Gordini (French pronunciation: ​[ɡɔʁdini]) is a division of Renault Sport Technologies (Renault Sport).[1][2] In the past, it was a sports car manufacturer and performance tuner, established in 1946 by Amédée Gordini, nicknamed "Le Sorcier" (The Sorcerer). Gordini became a division of Renault in 1968 and of Renault Sport in 1976.[3]

Gordini
Division
IndustryAutomotive
Founded1946
Headquarters,
ParentRenault Sport

History

Gordini Type 16
Gordini Type 32
1950 Simca Gordini T15s
1950 Simca Gordini T15s, as raced, and retired, at the 1950 24 Hours of Le Mans by José Froilán González and Juan Manuel Fangio

Amédée Gordini tuned cars and competed in motor races since the 1930s. His results prompted Simca (the French assembler of Fiat) to hire him for its motorsport program and to develop road cars. Their association continued after World War II.[4]

In 1946, Gordini introduced the first cars bearing his name, Fiat-engined single-seaters raced by him and Jose Scaron, achieving several victories. In the late 1940s, the company opened a workshop at the Boulevard Victor in Paris, entering sports car and Grand Prix races.[5] Gordini and Simca started to diverge in 1951 because of political conflicts.[4]

Gordini competed in Formula One from 1950 to 1956 (with a brief return in 1957 with an eight cylinder engine), although it achieved a major success in Formula Two during that period.[5]

After its Formula One program ended, Gordini worked with Renault as an engine tuner, entering Renault-Gordini cars at the 24 Hours of Le Mans between 1962 and 1969. It also tuned engines for Alpine, a rival sports car manufacturer also associated with Renault. In 1957, Gordini and Renault manufactured the Dauphine Gordini, a modified version of the Renault Dauphine which was a sales success.[6] Gordini-tuned Renault cars also won various rallies during the 1950s and 1960s.[7] In 1963, the Gordini company planned to move its headquarters to Noisy-le-Roi. At the end of 1968, Gordini retired and sold a 70% majority stake from his firm to Renault.[8] Renault-Gordini was moved to Viry-Châtillon in 1969 and became a sport division of Renault, before being merged with Alpine to form Renault Sport in 1976.[3] On 1 January 1976, René Vuaillat became director of Gordini.[9] The Gordini company name became wholly owned by Renault in 1977.[8]

Renault sold Gordini-badged performance versions of models including the Renault 5, the Renault 8 the Renault 12 and the Renault 17.

In November 2009, Renault announced that it would be reviving the Gordini name for an exclusive line of hot hatches, in a similar fashion to Fiat's revival of its Abarth name.[10] Modern models to bear the name include the Renault Twingo and the Renault Clio.

Models

Renault Twingo Gordini RS (II) – Frontansicht, 26. März 2011, Düsseldorf
Renault Twingo Gordini RS (II) – Heckansicht, 26. März 2011, Düsseldorf
Renault Twingo RS Gordini
Renault Clio RS Gordini 2010
Clio Gordini
R8 Gordini2
Renault 8 Gordini
  • Dauphine Gordini (1957–1967)
  • Renault 8 Gordini (1964–1970)
  • Renault 12 Gordini (1970–1974)
  • Renault 17 Gordini (1974–1978)[11]
  • Clio Gordini RS (2010–present)
  • Twingo Gordini (2010–present)
  • Twingo Gordini RS (2010–present)
  • Wind Gordini (2011–2013)

Car colours

Since its early Renault models the most characteristic colour scheme of Gordini cars has been bleu de France (the French motor racing colour) with white stripes,[12] although different combinations have been used over the years.[13]

Formula One results

(key) (results in bold indicate pole position) (results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Chassis Engine Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1950 Simca Gordini Type 15 Gordini straight-4 GBR MON 500 SUI BEL FRA ITA
France Robert Manzon Ret 4 Ret
France Maurice Trintignant Ret Ret
1951 Simca Gordini Type 15 Gordini straight-4 SUI 500 BEL FRA GBR GER ITA ESP
France André Simon Ret Ret 6 Ret
France Robert Manzon Ret 7 Ret 9
France Maurice Trintignant Ret Ret DNS Ret
France Aldo Gordini Ret
France Jean Behra Ret
1952 Gordini Type 16 Gordini straight-6 SUI 500 BEL FRA GBR GER NED ITA
France Robert Manzon Ret 3 4 Ret Ret 5 14
France Jean Behra 3 Ret 7 5 Ret Ret
Belgium Johnny Claes 8
Thailand Prince Bira Ret 11
France Maurice Trintignant Ret Ret 6 Ret
Simca Gordini Type 15 Simca straight-4 Switzerland Max de Terra Ret
Gordini Straight-4 Thailand Prince Bira Ret 10
Belgium Johnny Claes Ret 14 DNQ
United States Robert O'Brien NC
France Maurice Trintignant 5
Belgium Paul Frère Ret
1953 Gordini Type 16 Gordini straight-6 ARG 500 NED BEL FRA GBR GER SUI ITA
France Jean Behra 6 Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret
France Maurice Trintignant 7† 6 5 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5
United States Harry Schell 7† Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret 9
France Robert Manzon Ret
Argentina Carlos Menditeguy Ret
Argentina Roberto Mieres NC Ret 6
United States Fred Wacker 9
Simca Gordini Type 15 Gordini straight-4 Argentina Pablo Birger Ret
Belgium Georges Berger Ret
1954 Gordini Type 16 Gordini straight-6 ARG 500 BEL FRA GBR GER SUI ITA ESP
France Jean Behra DSQ Ret 6 Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret
France Élie Bayol 5
France Roger Loyer Ret
Belgium Paul Frère Ret Ret Ret
Belgium André Pilette 5 9 Ret
France Jacques Pollet Ret Ret
Belgium Georges Berger Ret
Argentina Clemar Bucci Ret Ret Ret Ret
United States Fred Wacker Ret 6
1955 Gordini Type 16 Gordini straight-6 ARG MON 500 BEL NED GBR ITA
France Élie Bayol Ret Ret
Argentina Jesus Iglesias Ret
Argentina Pablo Birger Ret
France Robert Manzon Ret Ret Ret
France Jacques Pollet 7 10 Ret
Brazil Hermano da Silva Ramos 8 Ret Ret
France Mike Sparken 7
France Jean Lucas Ret
1956 Gordini Type 32 Gordini straight-8 ARG MON 500 BEL FRA GBR GER ITA
Belgium André Pilette 6† DNS
France Élie Bayol 6†
France Robert Manzon 9 9 Ret Ret
Brazil Hermano da Silva Ramos 8 Ret Ret
Belgium Andre Milhoux Ret
Gordini Type 16 Gordini straight-6 Brazil Hermano da Silva Ramos 5
France Robert Manzon Ret
Belgium André Pilette 11
France André Simon 9

(† indicates shared drive)

References

  1. ^ "Renault revives Gordini". Renault. Archived from the original on 21 May 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  2. ^ "Renault Sport range". Renault. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  3. ^ a b Smith, Roy P (2010). "The Winds of Change: 1974–1979". Alpine Renault: – The fabulous berlinettes. Veloce Publishing. pp. 180–181. ISBN 978-1-845844-04-2.
  4. ^ a b Lawrence, Mike (1996). "Gordini". A to Z of Sports Cars, 1945–1990. A to Z. Motorbooks International. ISBN 1-870979-81-8.
  5. ^ a b "Constructors: Gordini (Equipe Gordini)". Grandprix.com. Archived from the original on 30 October 2013. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  6. ^ "Gordini" (PDF). Renault. Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 September 2011. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  7. ^ "Renault Manufacturer Profile & Rally History". Rallye-info.com. Archived from the original on 16 May 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  8. ^ a b Smith, Roy (2008). "Gordini the name on the engine". Alpine and Renault: The Development of the Revolutionary Turbo F1 Car 1968–1979. Veloce Publishing. pp. 38–39. ISBN 978-1-84584-226-0.
  9. ^ Cléon - Association RENAULT HISTOIRE Archived 2015-06-26 at the Wayback Machine sur Association RENAULT HISTOIRE
  10. ^ Joseph, Noah (10 November 2009). "Renault revives the Gordini name for exclusive line of hot hatches". Autoblog.
  11. ^ "Renault-Gordini History". Renault Sport South Africa. Archived from the original on 9 June 2011. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  12. ^ Smith, Roy P (2013). "Gordinis for the Road and track: 1958–1979". Amedee Gordini: A True Racing Legend. Veloce Publishing. p. 256. ISBN 978-1-845843-17-5.
  13. ^ "New Renault Clio RS Gordini Coming in 2014 with 230 HP". Autoevolution.com. Retrieved 17 November 2013.
1950 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1950 Monaco Grand Prix, formally titled the Prix de Monte-Carlo et XIe Grand Prix Automobile, was a Formula One motor race held on 21 May 1950 at Monaco. It was race two of seven in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers. The 100-lap race was held at an overall distance of 318.1 km (197.1 mi) and was won by Juan Manuel Fangio for the Alfa Romeo team after starting from pole position. Alberto Ascari finished second for Ferrari and Louis Chiron finished third for Maserati.

1951 Spanish Grand Prix

The 1951 Spanish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 28 October 1951 at Pedralbes Circuit. It was the eighth and final race of the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

This race was determined by tyre choice – Ferrari chose a 16 inch rear wheel, whilst Alfa Romeo settled for the 18 inch, which proved to be the better of the two options.

Juan Manuel Fangio led Alberto Ascari by two points before the race. Ascari led the race from José Froilán González, but the Ferraris suffered numerous tread problems. Piero Taruffi threw a tyre tread on lap 6 and was followed on lap 7 by Luigi Villoresi, Ascari on lap 8 and Gonzalez on lap 14. The Ferraris were forced to stop frequently to change tyres and Fangio comfortably won the race and his first drivers' title, after Ascari finished 4th was not able to overhaul Fangio's total. After the race, Alfa Romeo announced that due to lack of finances, they would not be competing in the 1952 season.

1952 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1952 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 22 June 1952 at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. It was race 3 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

1952 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1952 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 17 August 1952 at the Circuit Zandvoort. It was race 7 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. His teammates Giuseppe Farina and Luigi Villoresi finished in second and third places.

1952 Formula One season

The 1952 Formula One season was the sixth season of FIA Formula One motor racing. In comparison to previous seasons, the 1952 season consisted of a relatively small number of Formula One races, following the decision to run all the Grand Prix events counting towards the World Championship of Drivers to Formula Two regulations rather than Formula One. The Indianapolis 500 was still run to AAA regulations as in previous seasons.

The 3rd FIA World Championship of Drivers, which began on 18 May and ended on 7 September after eight races, was won by Alberto Ascari, driving for Scuderia Ferrari.

In addition to the Formula One races and the World Championship Formula Two races, numerous other Formula Two races, which did not count towards the Championship, were held during the year.

1952 French Grand Prix

The 1952 French Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 6 July 1952 at Rouen-Les-Essarts. It was race 4 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. Unusually this race was run over a duration of 3 hours, rather than a fixed distance.

1952 Italian Grand Prix

The 1952 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 7 September 1952 at Monza. It was the eighth and final round of the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 80-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. José Froilán González finished second for the Maserati team and Ascari's teammate Luigi Villoresi came in third.

1952 Swiss Grand Prix

The 1952 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 18 May 1952 at Bremgarten Circuit. It was the first round of the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

Pre-WWII Grand Prix great Rudolf Caracciola crashed heavily during a support sports car race. He survived with a broken leg, but this crash effectively ended his racing career. He was driving a Mercedes 300SL; his brakes locked up going into a corner and the car skidded off the road and hit a tree.

Italian driver Piero Taruffi scored his only win in a World Championship race, driving for Ferrari.

1953 Argentine Grand Prix

The 1953 Argentine Grand Prix was race 1 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two regulations in 1952 and 1953. The race was held in Buenos Aires on January 18, 1953, at the Autódromo Galvez (official name: Autódromo Juan y Óscar Gálvez, also known as the Autódromo 17 de Octubre) as the first official Formula One race in South America and outside of Europe. Previously, the Indianapolis 500 (part of the Formula One championship calendar from 1950 to 1960) was the only Formula One championship race held outside Europe but run to AAA regulations.

1953 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1953 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 21 June 1953 at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. It was race 4 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 36-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from second position. His teammate Luigi Villoresi finished second and Maserati driver Onofre Marimón came in third.

1953 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1953 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 7 June 1953 at the Circuit Zandvoort. It was race 3 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. His teammate Nino Farina finished second and Maserati drivers José Froilán González and Felice Bonetto came in third

André Simon (racing driver)

André Simon (5 January 1920 – 11 July 2012) was a racing driver from France. He participated in Formula One from 1951 to 1957, competing in a total of 12 World Championship races but scoring no championship points.

Jean Behra

Jean Marie Behra (16 February 1921 – 1 August 1959) was a Formula One driver who raced for the Gordini, Maserati, BRM, Ferrari and Porsche teams.

Maurice Trintignant

Maurice Bienvenu Jean Paul Trintignant (30 October 1917, in Sainte-Cécile-les-Vignes, Vaucluse – 13 February 2005, in Nîmes) was a motor racing driver and vintner from France. He competed in the Formula One World Championship for fourteen years, between 1950 and 1964, one of the longest careers in the early years of Formula One. During this time he also competed in sports car racing, including winning the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans race. Following his retirement from the track Trintignant concentrated on the wine trade.

Maurice Trintignant was the brother of Bugatti race car driver Louis Trintignant — who was killed in 1933, in practice, at Péronne, Picardy — and the uncle of renowned French film actor Jean-Louis Trintignant.

Paul Frère

Paul Frère (30 January 1917 – 23 February 2008) was a racing driver and journalist from Belgium. He participated in eleven World Championship Formula One Grands Prix debuting on 22 June 1952 and achieving one podium finish with a total of eleven championship points. He drove in several non-Championship Formula One races.

He also won the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans, driving for Ferrari with fellow Belgian teammate Olivier Gendebien.

Renault 15 and 17

The Renault 15 and Renault 17 are two variations of the same coupé designed and built by French automaker Renault between July 1971 and August 1979. The R17 was sold as R177 in Italy, respecting the heptadecaphobia superstition.

They were effectively coupé versions of the Renault 12. The main differences between the two cars were their headlight configuration (the 15 had two rectangular headlights whereas the 17 had four round headlights) and their rear side windows. Some markets show the 17 with the rectangular lights for TL versions.

The Renault 15 and 17 were presented at the Paris Motor Show in October 1971.

Renault 8 and 10

The Renault 8 (Renault R8 until 1964) and Renault 10 are two rear-engined, rear-wheel drive small family cars produced by the French manufacturer Renault in the 1960s and early 1970s.

The 8 was launched in 1962, and the 10, a more upmarket version of the 8, was launched in 1965. The Renault 8 ceased production and sales in France in 1973. By then the Renault 10 had already been replaced, two years earlier, by the front wheel drive Renault 12.

They were produced in Bulgaria until 1970 (see Bulgarrenault), and an adapted version of the Renault 8 continued to be produced in Spain until 1976. In Romania, a version of the 8 was produced under license between 1968 and 1972 as the Dacia 1100. In total 37,546 Dacia 1100s were built.

Renault Dauphine

Renault Dauphine (pronounced [dɔfin]) is a rear-engined economy car manufactured by Renault in a single body style – a three-box, 4-door saloon – as the successor to the Renault 4CV; more than two million were manufactured during its 1956-1967 production.

Along with such cars as the Citroën 2CV, Volkswagen Beetle, Morris Minor, Mini and Fiat 500, the Dauphine pioneered the modern European economy car.Renault marketed numerous variants of the Dauphine, including a luxury version, the Renault Ondine, sporting versions, the Dauphine Gordini and the Ondine Gordini, the 1093 factory racing model, and the Caravelle/Floride, a Dauphine-based two-door coupé and two-door convertible.

Robert Manzon

Robert Manzon (12 April 1917 – 19 January 2015) was a French racing driver. He participated in 29 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on 21 May 1950. He achieved two podiums, and scored a total of 16 championship points. At the time of his death, Manzon was the last surviving driver to have taken part in the first Formula One World Championship in 1950.

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