Google for Work

Google for Work (also referred to as Google Apps for Work) was a service from Google that provides customizable enterprise versions of several Google products using a domain name provided by the customer. It featured several Web applications with similar functionality to traditional office suites, including Gmail, Hangouts, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Groups, News, Play, Sites, and Vault. It was the vision of Rajen Sheth, a Google employee who later developed Chromebooks.[1]

Google for Work
Google for Work logo 2015
Developer(s)Google Inc.
PlatformGmail, Calendar, Hangouts, Drive, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Google Sites and Vault.
TypeWeb productivity tools
LicenseProprietary
Websitewww.google.com/work/

See also

References

  1. ^ Metz, Cade (October 7, 2011). "Chromebook: 'Father of Google Apps' Raises Second Child". Wired. Retrieved 7 October 2011.

External links

Android Q

Android "Q" is the upcoming tenth major release and the 17th version of the Android mobile operating system. The first beta of Android Q was released on March 13, 2019 for all Google Pixel phones. The final release of Android Q is scheduled to be released in the third quarter of 2019.

BigQuery

BigQuery is a RESTful web service that enables interactive analysis of massively large datasets working in conjunction with Google Storage. It is a serverless Platform as a Service (PaaS) that may be used complementarily with MapReduce.

Chrome Web Store

The Chrome Web Store (CWS) is Google's online store for its Chrome web browser. CWS hosts thousands of extensions and web apps.

Chromebit

The Chromebit is a dongle running Google's Chrome OS operating system. When placed in the HDMI port of a television or a monitor, this device turns that display into a personal computer. Chromebit allows adding a keyboard or mouse over Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. The device was announced in April 2015 and began shipping that November.

Flutter (software)

Flutter is an open-source mobile application development framework created by Google. It is used to develop applications for Android and iOS, as well as being the primary method of creating applications for Google Fuchsia.

GData

GData (Google Data Protocol) provides a simple protocol for reading and writing data on the Internet, designed by Google. GData combines common XML-based syndication formats (Atom and RSS) with a feed-publishing system based on the Atom Publishing Protocol, plus some extensions for handling queries. It relies on XML or JSON as a data format.

Google provides GData client libraries for Java, JavaScript, .NET, PHP, Python, and Objective-C.

G Suite

G Suite (formerly Google Apps for Work and Google Apps for Your Domain) is a brand of cloud computing, productivity and collaboration tools, software and products developed by Google, first launched on August 28, 2006 as "Google Apps for Your Domain". G Suite comprises Gmail, Hangouts, Calendar, and Google+ for communication; Drive for storage; Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, and Sites for collaboration; and, depending on the plan, an Admin panel and Vault for managing users and the services. It also includes the digital interactive whiteboard Jamboard and the app development platform App Maker.

While these services are free to use for consumers, G Suite adds enterprise features such as custom email addresses at a domain (@yourcompany.com), option for unlimited cloud storage (depending on plan and number of members), additional administrative tools and advanced settings, as well as 24/7 phone and email support.Being based in Google's data centers, data and information is saved instantly and then synchronized to other data centers for backup purposes. Unlike the free, consumer-facing services, G Suite users do not see advertisements while using the services, and information and data in G Suite accounts do not get used for advertisement purposes. Furthermore, G Suite administrators can fine-tune security and privacy settings.

As of January 2017, G Suite has 4 million paying businesses, and 70 million G Suite for Education users.

Gayglers

Gayglers is a term for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender employees of Google. The term was first used for all LGBT employees at the company in 2006, and was conceived as a play on the word "Googler" (a colloquial term to describe all employees of Google).The term, first published openly by The New York Times in 2006 to describe some of the employees at the company's new Manhattan office, came into public awareness when Google began to participate as a corporate sponsor and float participant at several pride parades in San Francisco, New York, Dublin and Madrid during 2006. Google has since increased its public backing of LGBT-positive events and initiatives, including an announcement of opposition to Proposition 8.

Google Behind the Screen

"Google: Behind the Screen" (Dutch: "Google: achter het scherm") is a 51-minute episode of the documentary television series Backlight about Google. The episode was first broadcast on 7 May 2006 by VPRO on Nederland 3. It was directed by IJsbrand van Veelen, produced by Nicoline Tania, and edited by Doke Romeijn and Frank Wiering.

Google Cloud

Google Cloud may refer to:

Google Cloud Connect, a plug-in to synchronize Microsoft Office documents to Google Docs

Google Cloud Dataproc, a cloud-based managed Spark and Hadoop service

Google Cloud Datastore, a NoSQL database service

Google Cloud Messaging, a mobile notification service

Google Cloud Platform, a suite of cloud computing services

Google Cloud Print, a service that lets users print from any device within a network cloud

Google for Work, renamed Google Cloud

Google Dataset Search

Google Dataset Search is a search engine from Google that helps researchers locate online data that is freely available for use. The company launched the service on September 5, 2018, and stated that the product was targeted at scientists and data journalists.

Google Dataset Search complements Google Scholar, the company's search engine for academic studies and reports.

Google Finance

Google Finance is a website focusing on business news and financial information hosted by Google.

Google Fit

Google Fit is a health-tracking platform developed by Google for the Android operating system and Wear OS. It is a single set of APIs that blends data from multiple apps and devices. Google Fit uses sensors in a user's activity tracker or mobile device to record physical fitness activities (such as walking or cycling), which are measured against the user's fitness goals to provide a comprehensive view of their fitness.

Google Flights

Google Flights is an online flight booking search service which facilitates the purchase of airline tickets through third party suppliers.

Google Forms

Google Forms is a survey administration app that is included in the Google Drive office suite along with Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Google Slides.

Forms features all of the collaboration and sharing features found in Docs, Sheets, and Slides.

Google Guice

Google Guice (pronounced "juice") is an open-source software framework for the Java platform released by Google under the Apache License. It provides support for dependency injection using annotations to configure Java objects. Dependency injection is a design pattern whose core principle is to separate behavior from dependency resolution.

Guice allows implementation classes to be bound programmatically to an interface, then injected into constructors, methods or fields using an @Inject annotation. When more than one implementation of the same interface is needed, the user can create custom annotations that identify an implementation, then use that annotation when injecting it.

Being the first generic framework for dependency injection using Java annotations in 2008, Guice won the 18th Jolt Award for best Library, Framework, or Component.

Google Lens

Google Lens is an image recognition mobile app developed by Google. First announced during Google I/O 2017, it is designed to bring up relevant information using visual analysis.

Google Now

Google Now was a feature of Google Search of the Google app for Android and iOS. Google Now proactively delivered information to users to predict (based on search habits and other factors) information they may need in the form of informational cards. Google Now branding is no longer used, but the functionality continues in the Google app and its feed.Google first included Google Now in Android 4.1 ("Jelly Bean"), which launched on July 9, 2012, and the Galaxy Nexus smartphone was first to support it. The service became available for iOS on April 29, 2013, without most of its features. In 2014, Google added Now cards to the notification center in Chrome OS and in the Chrome browser. Later, however they removed the notification center entirely from Chrome. Popular Science named Google Now the "Innovation of the Year" for 2012.Since 2015, Google gradually phased out reference to "Google Now" in the Google app, largely removing remaining use of "Now" in October 2016, including replacing Now cards with Feed. At Google I/O 2016, Google showcased its new intelligent personal assistant Google Assistant, in some ways an evolution of Google Now. Unlike Google Now, however, Assistant can engage in two-way dialogue with the user.

Google The Thinking Factory

Google: The Thinking Factory is documentary film about Google Inc. from 2008 written and directed by Gilles Cayatte.

As a service
Technologies
Applications
Platforms
Infrastructure
Overview
Advertising
Communication
Software
Platforms
Hardware
Development
tools
Publishing
Search
(timeline)
Events
People
Other
Related

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.