Google Trends

Google Trends is a website by Google that analyzes the popularity of top search queries in Google Search across various regions and languages. The website uses graphs to compare the search volume of different queries over time.

On August 5, 2008, Google launched Google Insights for Search, a more sophisticated and advanced service displaying search trends data. On September 27, 2012, Google merged Google Insights for Search into Google Trends.[1]

Google Trends
Google Trends
Type of site
Search analysis
Available inEnglish, Portuguese, Chinese
OwnerGoogle
Created byGoogle
WebsiteGoogle Trends
LaunchedMay 11, 2006
Current statusactive

Background

Google Trends also allows the user to compare the relative search volume of searches between two or more terms.

Originally, Google neglected updating Google Trends on a regular basis. In March 2007, internet bloggers noticed that Google had not added new data since November 2006, and Trends was updated within a week. Google did not update Trends from March until July 30, and only after it was blogged about, again.[2] Google now claims to be "updating the information provided by Google Trends daily; Hot Trends is updated hourly."

On August 6, 2008, Google launched a free service called Insights for Search. Insights for Search is an extension of Google Trends and although the tool is meant for marketers, it can be utilized by any user. The tool allows for the tracking of various words and phrases that are typed into Google's search-box. The tracking device provided a more-indepth analysis of results. It also has the ability to categorize and organize the data, with special attention given to the breakdown of information by geographical areas.[3] In 2012, the Insights for Search has been merged into Google Trends with a new interface.

In 2009, Yossi Matias et al. published research on the predictability of search trends.[4] In a series of highly influential articles in The New York Times, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz used Google Trends to measure a variety of behaviors. For example, in June 2012, he argued that search volume for the word "nigger(s)" could be used to measure racism in different parts of the United States. Correlating this measure with Obama's vote share, he calculated that Obama lost about 4 percentage points due to racial animus in the 2008 presidential election.[5] He also used Google data, along with other sources, to estimate the size of the gay population. This article noted that the most popular search beginning "is my husband" is "is my husband gay?"[6] In addition, he found that American parents were more likely to search "is my son gifted?" than "is my daughter gifted?" But they were more likely to search "is my daughter overweight?" than "is my son overweight?"[7] He also examined cultural differences in attitudes around pregnancy.[8]

Evidence is provided by Jeremy Ginsberg et al. that Google Trends data can be used to track influenza-like illness in a population.[9] Because the relative frequency of certain queries is highly correlated with the percentage of physician visits in which a patient presents with influenza-like symptoms, an estimate of weekly influenza activity can be reported. A more sophisticated model for inferring influenza rates from Google Trends, capable of overcoming the mistakes of its predecessors has been proposed by Lampos et al.[10] Inferences (influenza-like illness rates) from this model for England are presented on the Flu Detector website.

Furthermore, it was shown by Tobias Preis et al. that there is a correlation between Google Trends data of company names and transaction volumes of the corresponding stocks on a weekly time scale.[11][12]

In April 2012, Tobias Preis, Helen Susannah Moat, H. Eugene Stanley and Steven R. Bishop used Google Trends data to demonstrate that Internet users from countries with a higher per capita gross domestic product (GDP) are more likely to search for information about the future than information about the past. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggest there may be a link between online behaviour and real-world economic indicators.[13][14][15] The authors of the study examined Google search queries made by Internet users in 45 different countries in 2010 and calculated the ratio of the volume of searches for the coming year (‘2011’) to the volume of searches for the previous year (‘2009’), which they call the ‘future orientation index’. They compared the future orientation index to the per capita GDP of each country and found a strong tendency for countries in which Google users enquire more about the future to exhibit a higher GDP. The results hint that there may potentially be a relationship between the economic success of a country and the information-seeking behaviour of its citizens online.

In April 2013, Tobias Preis and his colleagues Helen Susannah Moat and H. Eugene Stanley introduced a method to identify online precursors for stock market moves, using trading strategies based on search volume data provided by Google Trends.[16] Their analysis of Google search volume for 98 terms of varying financial relevance, published in Scientific Reports,[17] suggests that increases in search volume for financially relevant search terms tend to precede large losses in financial markets.[18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25]

The analysis of Tobias Preis was later found to be misleading and the results are most likely to be overfitted.[26] The group of Damien Challet tested the same methodology with unrelated to financial markets search words, such as terms for diseases, car brands or computer games. They have found that all these classes provide equally good "predictability" of the financial markets as the original set. For example, the search terms like "bone cancer", "Shelby GT 500" (car brand), "Moon Patrol" (computer game) provide even better performance as those selected in original work.[17]

Search quotas

Google has incorporated quota limits for Trends searches. This limits the number of search attempts available per user/IP/device. Details of quota limits have not yet been provided, but it may depend on geographical location or browser privacy settings. It has been reported in some cases that this quota is reached really quickly if one is not logged into a Google account before trying to access the trends service. [27]

Google Hot Trends

Google Hot Trends is an addition to Google Trends which displays the top 20 hot, i.e., fastest rising, searches (search-terms) of the past hour in various countries. This is for searches that have recently experienced a sudden surge in popularity.[28] For each of the search-terms, it provides a 24-hour search-volume graph as well as blog, news and web search results. Hot Trends has a history feature for those wishing to browse past hot searches. Hot Trends can be installed as an iGoogle Gadget. Hot Trends is also available as an hourly Atom web feed.

Google Trends for websites

Since 2008 there has been a sub-section of Google Trends which analyses traffic for websites, rather than traffic for search terms. This is a similar service to that provided by Alexa Internet. The Google Trends for Websites became unavailable after the September 27th, 2012 release of the new google trends product.[29]

Google Trends API

An API to accompany the Google Trends service was announced by Marissa Mayer, then vice president of search-products and user experience at Google. This was announced in 2007, and so far has not been released.[30]

A few unofficial Google Trends API tools have been released, along with a wiki detailing them and simple access to Google Trends data.

Implications of data

A group of researchers at Wellesley College examined data from Google Trends and analyzed how effective a tool it could be in predicting U.S. Congressional elections in 2008 and 2010. In highly contested races where data for both candidates were available, the data successfully predicted the outcome in 33.3% of cases in 2008 and 39% in 2010. The authors conclude that, compared to the traditional methods of election forecasting, incumbency and New York Times polls, and even in comparison with random chance, Google Trends did not prove to be a good predictor of either the 2008 or 2010 elections.[31] Another group has also explored possible implications for financial markets and suggested possible ways to combine insights from Google Trends with other concepts in technical analysis.[32]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Insights into what the world is searching for -- the new Google Trends, Yossi Matias, Insights Search, The official Google Search blog, September 28, 2012.
  2. ^ "Success! Google Trends Updated". InsideGoogle. July 30, 2007.
  3. ^ Helft, Miguel (August 6, 2008). "Google's New Tool Is Meant for Marketers". New York Times. Retrieved August 6, 2008.
  4. ^ On the predictability of Search Trends, Yossi Matias, Niv Efron, and Yair Shimshoni, Insights Search, Google Research blog, August 17, 2009.
  5. ^ Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth. "How Racist Are We? Ask Google". The New York Times.
  6. ^ Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth. "How Many American Men Are Gay?". The New York Times.
  7. ^ Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth. "Tell Me, Google. Is My Son a Genius?". The New York Times.
  8. ^ Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth. "What Do Pregnant Women Want". The New York Times.
  9. ^ Jeremy Ginsberg; Matthew H. Mohebbi; Rajan S. Patel; Lynnette Brammer; Mark S. Smolinski; Larry Brilliant (2009). "Detecting influenza epidemics using search engine query data". Nature. 457 (7232): 1012–1014. Bibcode:2009Natur.457.1012G. doi:10.1038/nature07634. PMID 19020500.
  10. ^ Lampos, Vasileios; Miller, Andrew C.; Crossan, Steve; Stefansen, Christian (3 Aug 2015). "Advances in nowcasting influenza-like illness rates using search query logs". Scientific Reports. 5 (12760). Bibcode:2015NatSR...512760L. doi:10.1038/srep12760. PMC 4522652. PMID 26234783.
  11. ^ Tobias Preis; Daniel Reith; H. Eugene Stanley (2010). "Complex dynamics of our economic life on different scales: insights from search engine query data". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A. 368: 5707–5719. Bibcode:2010RSPTA.368.5707P. doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0284. PMID 21078644.
  12. ^ Catherine Mayer (November 15, 2010). "Study: Are Google Searches Affecting the Stock Market?". Time Magazine. Retrieved January 12, 2011.
  13. ^ Tobias Preis, Helen Susannah Moat, H. Eugene Stanley and Steven R. Bishop (2012). "Quantifying the Advantage of Looking Forward". Scientific Reports. 2: 350. Bibcode:2012NatSR...2E.350P. doi:10.1038/srep00350. PMC 3320057. PMID 22482034.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ Paul Marks (April 5, 2012). "Online searches for future linked to economic success". New Scientist. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  15. ^ Casey Johnston (April 6, 2012). "Google Trends reveals clues about the mentality of richer nations". Ars Technica. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  16. ^ Philip Ball (April 26, 2013). "Counting Google searches predicts market movements". Nature. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  17. ^ a b Tobias Preis; Helen Susannah Moat; H. Eugene Stanley (2013). "Quantifying Trading Behavior in Financial Markets Using Google Trends". Scientific Reports. 3: 1684. Bibcode:2013NatSR...3E1684P. doi:10.1038/srep01684. PMC 3635219. PMID 23619126.
  18. ^ Nick Bilton (April 26, 2013). "Google Search Terms Can Predict Stock Market, Study Finds". New York Times. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  19. ^ Christopher Matthews (April 26, 2013). "Trouble With Your Investment Portfolio? Google It!". TIME Magazine. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  20. ^ Philip Ball (April 26, 2013). "Counting Google searches predicts market movements". Nature. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  21. ^ Bernhard Warner (April 25, 2013). "'Big Data' Researchers Turn to Google to Beat the Markets". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  22. ^ Hamish McRae (April 28, 2013). "Hamish McRae: Need a valuable handle on investor sentiment? Google it". The Independent. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Richard Waters (April 25, 2013). "Google search proves to be new word in stock market prediction". Financial Times. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  24. ^ David Leinweber (April 26, 2013). "Big Data Gets Bigger: Now Google Trends Can Predict The Market". Forbes. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  25. ^ Jason Palmer (April 25, 2013). "Google searches predict market moves". BBC. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  26. ^ Challet, Damien; Ayed, Ahmed Bel Hadj (2013-07-17). "Predicting financial markets with Google Trends and not so random keywords". arXiv:1307.4643 [q-fin.ST].
  27. ^ https://productforums.google.com/d/msg/websearch/XOUD1LWHtWo/Clm_Oc2qAQAJ
  28. ^ How does Hot Searches work?, google.com
  29. ^ Insights into what the world is searching for -- the new Google Trends, Insights Search, The official Google Search blog, September 28, 2012.
  30. ^ Elinor Mills (December 4, 2007). "Google Trends API coming soon". Retrieved October 17, 2010.
  31. ^ ""On the Predictability of the U.S. Elections Through Search Volume Activity," at Journalist's Resource.org".
  32. ^ Lim, Shawn, Stridsberg, Douglas (2014). "Feeling the Market's Pulse with Google Trends". International Federation of Technical Analysts Journal 2015 Edition. SSRN 2502508.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

External links

AgoraVox

AgoraVox is a French language website of news powered by volunteers and non-professional writers, created by Carlo Revelli and Joël de Rosnay in March 2005, offering items by single or multiple writers.

AgoraVox was one of the first citizen journalism websites in France, and is similar to the community sites L'Echo du Village (1998) and Indymedia (1999). Many more or less participatory sites have emerged since, such as Rue 89, Le Post, Mediapart and Atlantico. It can be compared to the Korean site OhmyNews. According to the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the

Oxford University, "AgoraVox is one of the most prominent European examples of a citizen journalism site".As of April 2009, nearly 40,000 volunteers were enrolled as editors of the French version. They were 70,000 in April 2011. At that time, the site had over 1900 volunteer moderators. An Italian version of the site was launched at the end of 2008. Many variations have also emerged: AgoraVox TV, NaturaVox, EducaVox, CareVox, Orser and SportVox .

According to Google Trends, the site agoravox.fr has on average 50,000 daily unique visitors and agoravox.tv has 15,000 unique visitors.

Browser game

A browser game is a video game that is played over the Internet using a web browser. Browser games can be run using standard web technologies or browser plug-ins. The creation of such games usually involves use of standard web technologies as a frontend and other technologies to provide a backend. Browser games include all video game genres and can be single-player or multiplayer. Browser games are also portable and can be played on multiple different devices, web browsers, and operating systems.

Browser games come in many genres and themes that appeal to both regular and casual players. Multiple browser games have developed beyond the online platform to become large titles or franchises sold physically in stores, in online marketplaces like Steam or XBLA, or in decentralized distribution platforms such as itch.io. Some notable titles are Transformice, Alien Hominid, Bejeweled, Bloons, Club Penguin, Cookie Clicker, and Meat Boy.

Comparison of netbook-oriented Linux distributions

Netbooks are small laptops, with screen sizes between approximately 7 and 12 inches and low power consumption. They use either an SSD (solid state disk) or a HDD (hard disk drive) for storage, have up to 2 gigabytes of RAM (but often less), lack an optical disk drive, and usually have USB, Ethernet, WiFi and often Bluetooth connectivity. The name emphasizes their use as portable Internet appliances.

Copypasta

A copypasta is a block of text which get copied and pasted across the Internet by individuals through online forums and social networking websites, to the point of becoming spam.

DB-Engines ranking

The DB-Engines Ranking ranks database management systems by popularity, covering over 340 systems. The ranking criteria include number of search engine results when searching for the system names, Google Trends, Stack Overflow discussions, job offers with mentions of the systems, number of profiles in professional networks such as LinkedIn, mentions in social networks such as Twitter. The ranking is updated monthly. It has been described and cited in various database-related articles.By grouping over specific database features like database model or type of license, regularly published statistics reveal historical trends which are used in strategic statements.

Google Insights for Search

Google Insights for Search was a service by Google similar to Google Trends, providing insights into the search terms people use in the Google search engine. Unlike Google Trends, Google Insights for Search provides a visual representation of regional interest on a country's map. It displays top searches and rising searches that may help with keyword research. Results can be narrowed down with categories that are displayed for each search terms.

Term order is important in searches, and that different results will be found if keywords are placed in a different order.On September 27, 2012, Google Insights for Search was closed and merged into Google Trends again.

Krishnanum Radhayum

Krishnanum Radhayum (English: Krishn and Radha) is a 2011 Malayalam film, directed and produced by Santhosh Pandit who also plays the lead role in the film and also does the lyrics, music, fights, art, editing, back-ground music, effects, singer, story, dialogues, script, costumes, production designing and title graphics. The film was reportedly made within a budget of 5 lakhs

The film was released in 3 theatres on 21 October 2011 in Kerala. The film ran housefull on the first day of release. The film has been universally panned by the mainstream media.The Deccan Chronicle reported that on one of the Saturdays in November 2011, Pandit was number two on Google trends and that the searches had "crested on October 21, the day when his debut movie Krishnanum Radhayum was released and it quickly got damned by film pundits".

Latinx

Latinx (la-TEEN-ex) () is a gender-neutral term sometimes used in lieu of Latino or Latina (referencing Latin American cultural or racial identity). The plural is Latinxs. The -x replaces the standard -o and -a endings in Spanish and related languages, which form nouns of the masculine and feminine genders, respectively. The term is a politicized neologism that has gained traction among advocacy groups intersectionally combining the identity politics of race and gender. Other forms such as Latin@ and Latine are also used.

Leonid the Magnificent

Leonid the Magnificent (born Leonid Filatov) is a Russian performance artist born in 1973 in Siberia who now lives in Brooklyn, New York City. Leonid has been performing on stage since the age of 12. He finished Russian Circus School and University of Art and Culture to become an artist and a show creator. While in Russia, Leonid Filatov gained recognition by the Cultural Committee of the Government of Moscow as an acclaimed artiste of the State Central Concert Hall "Rossiya" - the most prestigious in the nation. Since coming to the USA he has performed in many cities across America including Miami, Las Vegas, New York City, New Jersey, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

His repertoire includes classical, modern or exotic dances, highly skilled circus acrobatics, musicals, comedy and drama. He performs solo or with his troupe, the Leo-Leopatra show. His style is highly versatile depending on the venue and occasion, ranging from serious and classical to raucous and edgy.

Leonid became known nationwide after his appearances on the first season of America's Got Talent in 2006. He was selected to go to the semi-finals. David Hasselhoff, a judge on the show, picked him to go on the wild card episode. His appearances on this show gained him a cult following and internet videoclips of these performances have been viewed by thousands of fans from around the world.

He reappeared in the final audition round of Season 2, and got in, although this time Hasselhoff's support for him had vanished as he threatened to leave the show and walked off temporarily after the other two judges, Sharon Osbourne and Piers Morgan, voted Leonid through. On June 26, 2007, when this episode was broadcast on national TV, the search terms "Leonid The Magnificent" rose to nationwide No. 13 on Google Trends.Leonid has also appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on May 19, 2005, and Jimmy Kimmel Live! in August 2006. On April 22, 2006, he was given the PREMIO ARTE Award as Extravagant Artist of the 2005 Year, in New Jersey. On March 28, 2007, he appeared on Greece national TV as a special guest star on Greece’s Got Talent in Athens, Greece. Most recently, Leonid re-auditioned for America's Got Talent in the 2011 New York auditions by singing and doing a quick-change magic act. He received a "Yes" vote from Howie Mandel and Sharon Osbourne, but Piers Morgan voted "No". He described Leonid as a "like a yo-yo that keeps coming back the harder [he] tried to throw him out".

He performed as a stand by during Vegas Week, but was eliminated and sent home by the judges, resulting Lenonid to swear at Piers for the outcome.

Leonid auditioned in several other countries's Got Talent versions as well such as Russian, French and Czechoslovak. In his home country's version he wasn't received as greatly as he was in the rest of the world as in later years he ended up passing the auditions round in La France a un Incroyable Talent season 10 and the Česko Slovensko má talent season 6 respectively.

Rage comic

A rage comic is a short comic using a growing set of pre-made cartoon faces, or rage faces, which usually express rage or some other simple emotion or activity. They are usually crudely-drawn in Microsoft Paint or other simple drawing programs, and were most popular in the early 2010s. These webcomics have spread much in the same way that internet memes do, and several memes have originated in this medium. They have been characterized by Ars Technica as an "accepted and standardized form of online communication." The popularity of rage comics has been attributed to their use as vehicles for humorizing shared experiences. The range of expression and standardized, easily identifiable faces has allowed uses such as teaching English as a foreign language.

Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski

Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski (born June 3, 1993) is an American theoretical physicist from Chicago, Illinois who studies high energy physics. She describes herself as "a proud first-generation Cuban-American & Chicago Public Schools alumna." She completed her undergraduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and is currently a graduate student at Harvard University. According to Google Trends, Pasterski was the #3 Trending Scientist for all of 2017. In 2015, she was named to the Forbes 30 under 30 Science list, named a Forbes 30 under 30 All Star in 2017, and returned as a judge in 2018 as part of Forbes' first ever all-female Science category judging panel.

Santhosh Pandit

Santhosh pandit is a Malayalam film actor, singer, and internet celebrity.The Deccan Chronicle reported that on one of the Saturdays in November 2011, Pandit was number 2 on Google trends and that the searches had "crested on October 21, the day when his debut movie Krishnanum Radhayum was released and he quickly got praised for his performance in the film by pundits".

Sarahah

Sarahah (Arabic: صراحة‎, translit. ṣarāḥa) is a social networking service for providing constructive feedback. In Arabic, sarahah means "frankness" or "honesty". It was created by Zain-Alabdin Tawfiq in the end of 2016 and reached a sudden worldwide success by mid-2017. This growth is considered to be deeply related with the release of a Snapchat update that allowed people to share URLs on their snaps.Sarahah allows people to text messages to others and the person reading that could then reply anonymously. Initially, it was meant for workers to compliment their bosses.

It was released on the US Apple App Store on June 13, 2017, and also has users in several other countries including Canada, India, and Lebanon. An update was released by Snapchat on July 5. Within two weeks, it was at the number 1 position. The rise was also seen in a Google Trends report.On 26 August 2017, it was reported that the Sarahah mobile app quietly uploads the user's address book to its web servers.After the popularity of Sarahah, spam invites were sent by the third-party apps to the users in exchange for revealing the usernames of anonymous senders.On 12 January 2018, it was reported that a woman in Queensland, Australia had started a petition to have the app and others like it banned, after friends of her 13-year-old daughter sent her abusive messages, including ones suggesting that she kill herself. A news report from the Australian Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) stated that the child's mother, Katrina, "called on Apple's App Store and Google Play to stop downloads of Sarahah, which allows people to leave anonymous feedback for each other". On 21 February Katrina posted a message declaring success, saying that both Apple and Google had removed the app from their stores.

Search analytics

Search analytics is the use of search data to investigate particular interactions among Web searchers, the search engine, or the content during searching episodes. The resulting analysis and aggregation of search engine statistics can be used in search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO). In other words, search analytics helps website owners understand and improve their performance on search engines, for example identifying highly valuable site visitors, or understanding user intent. Search analytics includes search volume trends and analysis, reverse searching (entering websites to see their keywords), keyword monitoring, search result and advertisement history, advertisement spending statistics, website comparisons, affiliate marketing statistics, multivariate ad testing, et al.

Tobias Preis

Tobias Preis is Professor of Behavioral Science and Finance at Warwick Business School and a fellow of the Alan Turing Institute. He is a computational social scientist focussing on measuring and predicting human behavior with online data. At Warwick Business School he directs the Data Science Lab together with his colleague Suzy Moat. Preis holds visiting positions at Boston University and University College London. In 2011, he worked as a senior research fellow with H. Eugene Stanley at Boston University and with Dirk Helbing at ETH Zurich. In 2009, he was named a member of the Gutenberg Academy. In 2007, he founded Artemis Capital Asset Management GmbH, a proprietary trading firm which is based in Germany. He was awarded a Ph.D. in physics from the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz in Germany.

Preis has quantified and modelled financial market fluctuations. In addition, he has made contributions to general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) in statistical physics and computational finance.In 2010, Preis headed a research team which provided evidence that search engine query data and stock market fluctuations are correlated. The team discovered a link between the number of Internet searches for company names and transaction volumes of the corresponding stocks on a weekly time scale. In a TEDx talk, Preis highlights the opportunities offered by studies of citizens' online behaviour to gain insights into socio and economic decision making.

In 2012, Preis used Google Trends data to demonstrate together with his colleagues Suzy Moat, H. Eugene Stanley and Steven R. Bishop that Internet users from countries with a higher per capita gross domestic product (GDP) are more likely to search for information about the future than information about the past. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggest there may be a link between online behaviour and real-world economic indicators. Preis and colleagues examined Google search queries made by Internet users in 45 different countries in 2010 and calculated the ratio of the volume of searches for the coming year (2011) to the volume of searches for the previous year (2009), which they call the Future Orientation Index. A comparison of the Future Orientation Index to the per capita GDP of each country revealed a strong tendency for countries in which Google users enquire more about the future to exhibit a higher GDP. Preis and colleagues conclude from this study that a relationship potentially exists between the economic success of a country and the information-seeking behaviour of its citizens online.In 2013, Preis and his colleagues Suzy Moat and H. Eugene Stanley introduced a method to identify online precursors for stock market moves, using trading strategies based on search volume data provided by Google Trends. Their analysis of Google search volume for 98 terms of varying financial relevance, published in Scientific Reports, suggests that increases in search volume for financially relevant search terms tend to precede large losses in financial markets. Similarly, in a study also published in Scientific Reports in 2013, Suzy Moat, Preis and colleagues demonstrated a link between changes in the number of views of Wikipedia articles relating to financial topics and subsequent large stock market moves.In 2015, Preis and his colleague Suzy Moat designed and delivered a massive open online course (MOOC) on big data. The course focuses on measuring and predicting human behavior.Preis is an academic editor of PLoS ONE.

Unboxing

Unboxing is the unpacking of products, especially high tech consumer products, where the process is captured on video and uploaded to the Internet. The item is then also explained in detail and also can sometimes be demonstrated as well.

Yahoo Tech places the first unboxing video to be for the Nokia E61 cellphone in 2006. According to Google Trends, searches for the term "unboxing" began to surface in the final quarter of 2006.Early unboxing videos focused mainly either on gadgets or fashion items. However, once the trend took off, unboxing videos were available for, as Yahoo's Deb Amien put it, "nearly every thing that is available for purchase." By 2014 the popularity of the videos were such that some companies had been known to upload unboxing videos for their own products, whilst others sent products to uploaders for free.Some consider the popularity of this practice is due to the ability of showing the product exactly for what it is without any adulteration advertisers usually make around the product. Being able to see what the customer is getting "can contribute to the decision process." Some users have tried to make these unboxings more interesting by adding special effects or doing them in different ways, such as an underwater unboxing of a waterproof smartphone.

Weedtuber

A weedtuber (a portmanteau of the words weed and YouTube) is a vlogger (an online video content creator) who deals with issues surrounding cannabis. Since cannabis legalization of the 2010s the producers/hosts sometimes consume cannabis on camera.

Popular weedtubers may have 300,000 or more channel subscribers. One (Joel Hradecky) has over one million as of early 2017. MassRoots listed 10 channels with over 100,000 subscribers in mid 2016. The term "weedtuber" began to appear on Google Trends in early 2015.A sponsor is reported to be willing to pay a channel with over 100,000 subscribers between $300 and $1000 for mentioning their product.

Ynet

Ynet (Hebrew: וואינט) is an Israeli news and general-content website, which is the online outlet for Yedioth Ahronot. However, most of Ynet's content is original work, published exclusively on the website and written by an independent staff.Ynet was launched in June 2000 in Hebrew only, and in 2004 launched its English edition, Ynetnews. In addition, Ynet hosts the online version of Yedioth Aharanot's media group magazines: Laisha (which also operates Ynet's fashion section), Pnai Plus, Blazer, GO magazine, and Mentha. For two years, Ynet had also an Arabic version, which ceased to operate in May 2005. Ynet's main competition comes from Walla! Mako and Nana. Since 2008, Ynet is Israel's most popular internet portal, as measured by Google Trends.According to Alexa Internet traffic rankings, Ynet is among the top 1,500 websites in the world and the top 10 sites in Israel.

Yossi Matias

Yossi Matias is an Israeli computer scientist, entrepreneur and Google executive.

Matias is Vice President, Engineering at Google, leading efforts in Search, Research and Crisis Response. He is also the managing director of Google's R&D Center in Israel.

He is a recipient of Gödel Prize and is an ACM Fellow for contributions to the analysis of big data and the field of streaming algorithms.

Matias established the Research and Development Center of Google in Israel. He led the development of Google products such as Google Trends, Google Insights for Search, Google Suggest, Google Visualization API, Ephemeral IDs for IoT, and Google Duplex. He pioneered an initiative to bring cultural and heritage collections online, such as the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial Museum archive, the Dead Sea Scrolls., and the Nelson Mandela Archive, which along with Google Art Project seeded up Google Cultural Institute.

He is leading a global initiative for Crisis Response.Matias is the executive lead and founder of Google's Campus Tel Aviv, a technology hub for promoting innovation and entrepreneurship and birthplace of programs such as Campus for Moms and LaunchPad, which has evolved into Launchpad Accelerator, and LaunchPad Studio for AI & ML focused startups.Prof. Matias is on the computer science faculty at Tel Aviv University, and previously a research scientist at Bell Labs and a visiting professor at Stanford. He published extensively in the areas of data analysis, algorithms for massive data sets, data streams and synopses, parallel algorithms and systems, data compression, data and information management systems, security and privacy, video processing, and Internet technologies. He is the inventor of some 45 patents.

Matias pioneered some of the early technologies for the effective analysis of big data, internet privacy and contextual search.

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