Google Safe Browsing

Google Safe Browsing is a blacklist service provided by Google that provides lists of URLs for web resources that contain malware or phishing content.[1][2] The Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Vivaldi, and GNOME Web browsers use the lists from the Google Safe Browsing service for checking pages against potential threats.[3][4] Google also provides a public API for the service.[5]

Google also provides information to Internet service providers, by sending e-mail alerts to autonomous system operators regarding threats hosted on their networks.[2]

According to Google, as of September 2017, over 3 billion Internet devices are protected by this service.[6]

Google Safe Browsing
Google Safe Browsing
Screenshot
Screenshot of the Google Safe Browsing in an Android device blocking a deceptive site.
Screenshot of the Google Safe Browsing in an Android device blocking a deceptive site.
Original author(s)Google
Developer(s)Google
Operating systemAndroid, Chrome OS, Windows, macOS, iOS, Web browsers
TypeInternet security
Websitesafebrowsing.google.com

Clients protected

Privacy

Google maintains the Safe Browsing Lookup API, which has a privacy drawback: "The URLs to be looked up are not hashed so the server knows which URLs the API users have looked up". The Safe Browsing Update API, on the other hand, compares 32-bit hash prefixes of the URL to preserve privacy.[7][8] The Chrome, Firefox and Safari browsers use the latter.[9]

Safe Browsing also stores a mandatory preferences cookie on the computer[10].

Google Safe Browsing "conducts client-side checks. If a website looks suspicious, it sends a subset of likely phishing and social engineering terms found on the page to Google to obtain additional information available from Google's servers on whether the website should be considered malicious". Logs, "including an IP address and one or more cookies" are kept for two weeks. They are "tied to the other Safe Browsing requests made from the same device."[11]

Criticism

Websites carrying ads that are infected might be blacklisted by Google Safe Browsing even when the website itself has no malware. To request removal from the blacklist requires a webmaster to create a Google Webmaster's Tool account which can take several days to be removed.[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ Barry Schwartz (May 23, 2008). "Google's Safe Browsing Diagnostic Tool". Search Engine Land. Retrieved 2012-09-01.
  2. ^ a b Lucian Constantin (Dec 2, 2011). "Google Safe Browsing Alerts Network Admins About Malware Distribution Domains". PCWorld.com. Retrieved 2012-09-01.
  3. ^ "Firefox Phishing and Malware Protection". Mozilla Foundation. Retrieved 2012-09-01.
  4. ^ "Phishing and malware detection". Google. Retrieved 2012-09-01.
  5. ^ "Safe Browsing API". Google. Retrieved 2012-09-01.
  6. ^ "Safe Browsing: Protecting more than 3 billion devices worldwide, automatically". The Google Blog. September 2017.
  7. ^ "Developer's Guide (v3)". Google Developers. 18 March 2015.
  8. ^ "Safe Browsing API - Google Developers". Google Developers. 18 March 2015.
  9. ^ Ed Bott. "Did Google withhold malware protection details from partners?". ZDNet.
  10. ^ "Cookies from Nowhere". Ashkan Soltani.
  11. ^ "Google Chrome Privacy Whitepaper". google.com.
  12. ^ "Google Safe Browsing Makes the Innocent Look Guilty". PCWorld. Retrieved 2018-07-29.

External links

Anti-phishing software

Anti-phishing software consists of computer programs that attempt to identify phishing content contained in websites, e-mail, or other forms used to accessing data (usually from the internet) and block the content, usually with a warning to the user (and often an option to view the content regardless). It is often integrated with web browsers and email clients as a toolbar that displays the real domain name for the website the viewer is visiting, in an attempt to prevent fraudulent websites from masquerading as other legitimate websites.

Most popular web browsers comes with built-in anti-phishing and anti-malware protection services, but almost none of the alternate web browsers have such protections.Password managers can also be used to help defend against phishing, as can some mutual authentication techniques.

Browser security

Browser security is the application of Internet security to web browsers in order to protect networked data and computer systems from breaches of privacy or malware. Security exploits of browsers often use JavaScript — sometimes with cross-site scripting (XSS) — sometimes with a secondary payload using Adobe Flash. Security exploits can also take advantage of vulnerabilities (security holes) that are commonly exploited in all browsers (including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Opera, Microsoft Internet Explorer, and Safari).

Comodo Dragon

Comodo Dragon is a freeware web browser. It is based on Chromium and is produced by Comodo Group. Sporting a similar interface to Google Chrome, Dragon does not implement Chrome's user tracking and some other potentially privacy-compromising features, substituting them for its own user tracking implementations, and provides additional security measures, such as indicating the authenticity and relative strength of a website's SSL certificate.

Features of Firefox

Mozilla Firefox has features that allow it to be distinguished from other web browsers, such as Chrome and Internet Explorer.

Firefox

Mozilla Firefox (or simply Firefox) is a free and open-source web browser developed by The Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, Mozilla Corporation. Firefox is available for Windows, macOS, Linux, BSD, illumos and Solaris operating systems. Its sibling, Firefox for Android, is also available. Firefox uses the Gecko layout engine to render web pages, which implements current and anticipated web standards. In 2017, Firefox began incorporating new technology under the code name Quantum to promote parallelism and a more intuitive user interface. An additional version, Firefox for iOS, was released on November 12, 2015. Due to platform restrictions, it uses the WebKit layout engine instead of Gecko, as with all other iOS web browsers.

Firefox was created in 2002 under the codename "Phoenix" by the Mozilla community members who desired a standalone browser, rather than the Mozilla Application Suite bundle. During its beta phase, Firefox proved to be popular with its testers and was praised for its speed, security, and add-ons compared to Microsoft's then-dominant Internet Explorer 6. Firefox was released on November 9, 2004, and challenged Internet Explorer's dominance with 60 million downloads within nine months. Firefox is the spiritual successor of Netscape Navigator, as the Mozilla community was created by Netscape in 1998 before their acquisition by AOL.Firefox usage grew to a peak of 32% at the end of 2009, with version 3.5 overtaking Internet Explorer 7, although not Internet Explorer as a whole. Usage then declined in competition with Google Chrome. As of January 2019, Firefox has 9.5% usage share as a "desktop" browser, according to StatCounter, making it the second-most popular such web browser; usage across all platforms is lower at 4.66% (and then third-most popular overall). Firefox is still the most popular desktop browser in a few countries including Cuba (even most popular overall at 49.7%) and Eritrea with 72.26% and 83.28% of the market share, respectively. According to Mozilla, in December 2014, there were half a billion Firefox users around the world.

Firefox 2

Mozilla Firefox 2 is a version of Firefox, a web browser released on October 24, 2006 by the Mozilla Corporation.

Firefox 2 uses version 1.8 of the Gecko layout engine for displaying web pages. The release contained many new features not found in Firefox 1.5, including improved support for Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and JavaScript 1.7, as well as user interface changes.

On March 22, 2006, the first alpha version of Firefox 2 (Bon Echo Alpha 1) was released. It featured Gecko 1.8.1 for the first time. Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.x is the final version officially supported on Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98 and Windows ME, although it can run on Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51 using tweaks. Mac OS X 10.5 support was added October 18, 2007 with version 2.0.0.8.

Firefox 2.0 featured updates to tabbed browsing environment, the extensions manager, the GUI, and the find, search, and software update engines; a new session restore feature; inline spell checking; and an anti-phishing feature which was implemented by Google as an extension, and later merged into the program itself.Mozilla ended support for Firefox 2 on December 18, 2008.

GNOME Web

GNOME Web (originally called Epiphany until 2012) is a free and open-source lightweight web browser developed by GNOME only for Linux and Unix-like systems.

The browser was forked from Galeon, after developers' disagreements about Galeon's growing complexity. Since then Web has been developed as part of the GNOME project and uses most of GNOME's technology and settings when applicable. It is part of the GNOME Core Applications. As required by the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines (HIG), Web maintains a clean and simple graphical user interface with only a required minimum number of features exposed to users by default. The browser's functionality and configurability can be extended with official and third-party extensions.Instead of developing a custom browser engine Epiphany originally used the Gecko layout engine until version 2.28 and WebKitGTK+ starting with version 2.20 in September 2007. This approach allows the relatively small developer community to maintain a sufficient level of modern web standards support. The features of Web include reuse of GNOME configuration settings, smart bookmarks and web application integration into user desktop.

GNOME Web is default web browser on elementary OS and its source code is available under the GNU General Public License. GNOME Web is only released as source code and binary builds of the browser are available in the software repository of most Linux distributions and BSD OSs.

Google Chrome

Google Chrome (commonly known simply as Chrome) is a cross-platform web browser developed by Google. It was first released in 2008 for Microsoft Windows, and was later ported to Linux, macOS, iOS, and Android. The browser is also the main component of Chrome OS, where it serves as the platform for web apps.

Most of Chrome's source code comes from Google's open-source Chromium project, but Chrome is licensed as proprietary freeware. WebKit was the original rendering engine, but Google eventually forked it to create the Blink engine; all Chrome variants except iOS now use Blink.As of February 2019, StatCounter estimates that Chrome has a 62% worldwide browser market share across all platforms. Because of this success, Google has expanded the "Chrome" brand name to other products: Chrome OS, Chromecast, Chromebook, Chromebit, Chromebox, and Chromebase.

Google Chrome for Android

Google's Chrome for Android is an edition of Google Chrome released for the Android system. On February 7, 2012, Google launched Google Chrome Beta for Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) devices, for selected countries. The first stable version of the browser was released on June 27, 2012. Chrome 18.0.1026.311, released on September 26, 2012, was the first version of Chrome for Android to support Intel x86 based mobile devices.

List of Google products

The following is a list of products and services provided by Google.

Maxthon

Maxthon (Chinese: 傲游浏览器, formerly named MyIE2) is a freeware web browser developed by the company Maxthon Ltd., based in Beijing, China. It is available for Windows, macOS, Linux, and as Maxthon Mobile for Android, iOS, and Windows Phone 8. As of version 3, Maxthon supports two web browser engines: WebKit and Trident.Maxthon won CNET WebWare 100 Awards in 2008 and 2009, and was #97 in PC World's list of the 100 Best Products of 2011.

Microsoft SmartScreen

SmartScreen (officially called Windows SmartScreen, Windows Defender SmartScreen and SmartScreen Filter in different places) is a cloud-based anti-phishing and anti-malware component included in several Microsoft products, including Windows 8 and later, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge and Outlook.com. It is designed to help protect users against attacks that utilize social engineering and drive-by downloads to infect a system by scanning URLs accessed by a user against a blacklist of websites containing known threats. With the Windows 10 Creators Update, Microsoft placed the SmartScreen settings into the Windows Defender Security Center.

MindGeek

MindGeek (formerly Manwin) is a privately held Canadian company that focuses primarily on Internet pornography. Though legally registered in Luxembourg, it operates mainly from Canada with headquarters in Montreal and additional offices in Dublin, London, Hamburg, Bucharest, Nicosia, Miami, San Diego and Los Angeles.MindGeek owns and operates many popular pornographic websites, including video sharing services Pornhub, RedTube, and YouPorn, as well as adult film production companies Brazzers, Digital Playground, Men.com, Reality Kings, and Sean Cody, among others.MindGeek has its origins in Mansef and Interhub (owners of Brazzers and Pornhub) founded in 2004 and 2007 respectively by Stephane Manos, Ouissam Youssef and Matt Keezer in Montreal, which internet entrepreneur Fabian Thylmann bought in 2010 changing their name to Manwin, going on an acquisition spree thereafter with financing from Colbeck Capital to buy out many other popular pornographic websites. Thylmann later sold his stake in Manwin, after coming under tax evasion charges, to the senior management of the company in Montreal composed of Feras Antoon and David Tassillo, who later changed the company's name to MindGeek.

It is the largest pornographic company owning both free and paid websites, an advertising network, and major professional porn studios and as such has garnered criticism for having detrimental effects on the porn industry due to its monopolistic control of the supply chain. The company has also been at the various ends of copyright lawsuits both as a plaintiff and defendant, for hosting pirated content or accusing others of hosting theirs. It has also been criticized for supporting age verification checks and creating tools thereof such as AgeID for compliance to the Digital Economy Act 2017 in UK.

MindGeek is a member of the Association of Sites Advocating Child Protection and uses the "Restricted To Adults" label to identify its pornographic websites.

Mozilla Corporation

The Mozilla Corporation (stylized as moz://a) is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation that coordinates and integrates the development of Internet-related applications such as the Firefox web browser, SeaMonkey Internet suite, and the Mozilla Thunderbird email client by a global community of open-source developers, some of whom are employed by the corporation itself. The corporation also distributes and promotes these products. Unlike the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, and the Mozilla open source project, founded by the now defunct Netscape Communications Corporation, the Mozilla Corporation is a taxable entity. The Mozilla Corporation reinvests all of its profits back into the Mozilla projects. The Mozilla Corporation's stated aim is to work towards the Mozilla Foundation's public benefit to "promote choice and innovation on the Internet."

A MozillaZine article explained:The Mozilla Foundation will ultimately control the activities of the Mozilla Corporation and will retain its 100 percent ownership of the new subsidiary. Any profits made by the Mozilla Corporation will be invested back into the Mozilla project. There will be no shareholders, no stock options will be issued and no dividends will be paid. The Mozilla Corporation will not be floating on the stock market and it will be impossible for any company to take over or buy a stake in the subsidiary. The Mozilla Foundation will continue to own the Mozilla trademarks and other intellectual property and will license them to the Mozilla Corporation. The Foundation will also continue to govern the source code repository and control who is allowed to check in.

Phishing

Phishing is the fraudulent attempt to obtain sensitive information such as usernames, passwords and credit card details by disguising as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication. Typically carried out by email spoofing or instant messaging, it often directs users to enter personal information at a fake website, the look and feel of which are identical to the legitimate site.Phishing is an example of social engineering techniques being used to deceive users. Users are often lured by communications purporting to be from trusted parties such as social web sites, auction sites, banks, online payment processors or IT administrators.Attempts to deal with phishing incidents include legislation, user training, public awareness, and technical security measures — because phishing attacks also often exploit weaknesses in current web security.The word itself is a neologism created as a homophone of fishing, due to the similarity of using a bait in an attempt to catch a victim.

Safari (web browser)

Safari is a graphical web browser developed by Apple, based on the WebKit engine. First released on desktop in 2003 with Mac OS X Panther, a mobile version has been bundled with iOS devices since the iPhone's introduction in 2007. Safari is the default browser on Apple devices. A Windows version was available from 2007 to 2012.

StopBadware

StopBadware is an anti-malware nonprofit organization focused on making the Web safer through the prevention, mitigation, and remediation of badware websites. It is the successor to StopBadware.org, a project started in 2006 at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. It spun off to become a standalone organization, and dropped the ".org" in its name, in January 2010.

URL shortening

URL shortening is a technique on the World Wide Web in which a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) may be made substantially shorter and still direct to the required page. This is achieved by using a redirect which links to the web page that has a long URL. For example, the URL "https://example.com/assets/category_B/subcategory_C/Foo/" can be shortened to "https://snip.ml/Foo", and the URL "https://example.com/about/index.html" can be shortened to "https://snip.ml/h2iBY". Often the redirect domain name is shorter than the original one. A friendly URL may be desired for messaging technologies that limit the number of characters in a message (for example SMS), for reducing the amount of typing required if the reader is copying a URL from a print source, for making it easier for a person to remember, or for the intention of a permalink. In November 2009, the shortened links of the URL shortening service Bitly were accessed 2.1 billion times.Other uses of URL shortening are to "beautify" a link, track clicks, or disguise the underlying address. Although disguising of the underlying address may be desired for legitimate business or personal reasons, it is open to abuse. Some URL shortening service providers have found themselves on spam blacklists, because of the use of their redirect services by sites trying to bypass those very same blacklists. Some websites prevent short, redirected URLs from being posted.

VirusTotal

VirusTotal is a website created by the Spanish security company Hispasec Sistemas. Launched in June 2004, it was acquired by Google Inc. in September 2012. The company's ownership switched in January 2018 to Chronicle, a subsidiary of Alphabet Inc..

VirusTotal aggregates many antivirus products and online scan engines to check for viruses that the user's own antivirus may have missed, or to verify against any false positives. Files up to 256 MB can be uploaded to the website or sent via email. Anti-virus software vendors can receive copies of files that were flagged by other scans but passed by their own engine, to help improve their software and, by extension, VirusTotal's own capability. Users can also scan suspect URLs and search through the VirusTotal dataset. VirusTotal for dynamic analysis of malware uses Cuckoo sandbox.

VirusTotal was selected by PC World as one of the best 100 products of 2007.

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