Google Pinyin

Google Pinyin IME (谷歌拼音输入法; Pinyin: Gǔgē Pīnyīn Shūrùfǎ) is an input method developed by Google China Labs. The tool was made publicly available on April 4, 2007. Beside Pinyin input, it also includes stroke count method input. As of March 2019, Google Pinyin has been discontinued and the download page tools.google.com/pinyin/ was deleted.

Google Pinyin
Google Pinyin logo
GooglePinyin
Developer(s)Google China
Initial releaseApril 4, 2007
Stable release
2.7.25.128 / June 19, 2014[1]
Preview release
3.0.1.98 / January 28, 2011
Operating systemWindows, Android
Available inSimplified chinese, traditional chinese
TypeInput method
LicenseFreeware
Websitetools.google.com/pinyin/

Availability

Windows

As of August 2012, Google Pinyin is available for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 & Windows 10. There are both 32-bit and 64-bit versions available.

Android

Google released a Pinyin IME system for Android 1.5 or newer in March 2009.[2] The Android Pinyin IME supports user dictionary synchronization with the desktop version.

Linux

By the end of 2008, more than 20% users of Google Pinyin wanted a Linux version of the input method, which was answered in the FAQ section with a general PR phrase "We always strive to provide a better user experience and we never stop our hard work to fulfill the customer needs".[3]

However, the Linux user community is porting the Android Google Pinyin IME to the non-Android Linux IME framework SCIM in the scim-googlepinyin module.

After Christmas 2009, the Google pinyin module for SCIM became also available for the Nokia Maemo 5 platform, which meant it could be downloaded to any Nokia N900 phone through the official application repositories.

Mac OS X

A closed beta version of Google Pinyin for Mac OS X was leaked on September 14, 2010.[4] The first public version is not yet available.

Copyright infringement allegations

After Google Pinyin was initially released in April 2007, it was soon discovered that Google Pinyin's dictionary database contained employee names of Sogou Pinyin, an indication that the dictionary was taken from Sogou, one of Google's competitors in the Chinese Internet market.[5] On April 8, 2007, Google admitted that they used "non-Google database resources". Shortly thereafter, a new version of Google Pinyin was released which no longer appeared to be based on Sogou's database.[6]

Synchronization failure

Google Pinyin for Windows has been failing to synchronize for years [7] because of the deprecation of Google ClientLogin authentication. A client with an alternative authentication method has not been announced yet. Google Pinyin for Android can still synchronize (within this platform only).

See also

References

  1. ^ "下载谷歌拼音输入法 - Google". Retrieved 2014-10-21.
  2. ^ "Android GIT repository, PinyinIME module". Archived from the original on 2009-09-11.
  3. ^ "常见问题:何时推出 Linux 或 Mac 版输入法?何时支持换肤功能?何时……?" (in Chinese).
  4. ^ [Google 输入法 for Mac 曝光 速度下载 http://marc.f2e.org/2010/09/14/google-ime-for-mac/]
  5. ^ Lemon, Sumner (2007-04-10). "Sohu Threatens to Sue Google". PC World. Retrieved 2007-05-08.
  6. ^ Lemon, Sumner (2007-04-09). "Google Admits Using Outside Source for Chinese App". PC World. Retrieved 2007-05-08.
  7. ^ "Failed to lig-in Pinyin IME with my google account".

External links

Chinese input methods for computers

Chinese input methods are methods that allow a computer user to input Chinese characters. Most, if not all, Chinese input methods fall into one of two categories: phonetic readings or root shapes. Methods under the phonetic category usually are easier to learn but are less efficient, thus resulting in slower typing speeds because they typically require users to choose from a list of phonetically similar characters for input; whereas methods under the root shape category allow very precise and speedy input but have a difficult learning curve because they often require a thorough understanding of a character's strokes and composition.

Other methods allow users to write characters directly onto touchscreens, such as those found on mobile phones and tablet computers.

Criticism of Google

Criticism of Google includes concern for tax avoidance, misuse and manipulation of search results, its use of others' intellectual property, concerns that its compilation of data may violate people's privacy and collaboration with Google Earth by the military to spy on us , censorship of search results and content, and the energy consumption of its servers as well as concerns over traditional business issues such as monopoly, restraint of trade, antitrust, "idea borrowing", and being an "Ideological Echo Chamber".

Alphabet Inc. is an American multinational public corporation invested in Internet search, cloud computing, and advertising technologies. Google hosts and develops a number of Internet-based services and products, and generates profit primarily from advertising through its AdWords program.Google's stated mission is "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful"; this mission, and the means used to accomplish it, have raised concerns among the company's critics. Much of the criticism pertains to issues that have not yet been addressed by cyber law.

Fcitx

Fcitx ([ˈfaɪtɪks], Chinese: 小企鹅输入法) is an input method framework with extension support for the X Window System that supports multiple input method engines including Pinyin transcription, table-based input methods (e.g. Wubi method), fcitx-chewing for Traditional Chinese, fcitx-keyboard for layout-based ones, fcitx-mozc for Japanese, fcitx-hangul for Korean.

It supports UTF-8, GBK and GB 18030 character encodings, can run in Linux and FreeBSD, and supports XIM protocol, GTK+ (both 2 and 3) and Qt input method modules.

Before version 3.6, Fcitx used GBK encoding internally, which has been changed to UTF-8 in the 4.0 release. Since version 4.1, it has become highly modular, and has added support for Google Pinyin (which was ported from the Android version), fbterm, and KDE.

As of March 2019, Fcitx GitHub repositories are archived, in read-only mode, and the code didn't see any updates from 2017.

Google IME

Google IME is a set of typing tools (input method editors) by Google for 22 languages, including Amharic, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Greek, Gujarati, Hindi, Japanese, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Sanskrit, Serbian, Tamil, Telugu, Tigrinya, and Urdu. It is a virtual keyboard that allows users to type in their local language text directly in any application without the hassle of copying and pasting.

Google Japanese Input

Google Japanese Input (Google 日本語入力, Gūguru Nihongo Nyūryoku) is an input method published by Google for the entry of Japanese text on a computer. Since its dictionaries are generated automatically from the Internet, it supports typing of personal names, Internet slang, neologisms and related terms.

Google also releases an open-source version without stable releases or quality assurance under the name mozc. As it is open source, it can be used on Linux-based systems, whereas Google Japanese Input is limited to Windows, MacOS, and Chrome OS. It does not use Google's closed-source algorithms for generating dictionary data from online sources.

List of Google apps for Android

e Google Play Store, although some may not show up in search results if they are listed as incompatible with your device (even though they may still function from an *.apk). Some of Google's apps may be pre-installed on some devices, depending upon the device manufacturer and the version of Android. A few of these apps, such as Gboard, are not supported on older versions of Android.

List of Google products

The following is a list of products and services provided by Google.

Microsoft Pinyin IME

Microsoft Pinyin IME (Chinese: 微软拼音输入法; pinyin: wēiruǎn pīnyīn shūrùfǎ) is the pinyin input method implementation developed by Microsoft and Harbin Institute of Technology. It is bundled with Microsoft Windows and Chinese editions of Microsoft Office. Various versions can be downloaded from Microsoft's website with some restrictions.

Pinyin input method

The pinyin method (simplified Chinese: 拼音输入法; traditional Chinese: 拼音輸入法; pinyin: pīnyīn shūrù fǎ) refers to a family of input methods based on the pinyin method of romanization.

In the most basic form, the pinyin method allows a user to input Chinese characters by entering the pinyin of a Chinese character and then presenting the user with a list of possible characters with that pronunciation. However, there are a number of slightly different such systems in use, and modern pinyin methods provide a number of convenient features.

Sogou Pinyin

Sogou Pinyin Method (Chinese: 搜狗拼音输入法; pinyin: Sōugǒu Pīnyīn Shūrùfǎ) is a popular Chinese Pinyin input method editor developed by Sohu.com, Inc. under its search engine brand name, Sogou.

Sogou Pinyin is a dominant input software in China. By July 2011, Sogou Pinyin had an 83.6% penetration rate with more than 300 million users.

Sohu

Sohu, Inc. (Chinese: 搜狐; pinyin: Sōuhú; literally: 'Search-fox') is a Chinese Internet company headquartered in the Sohu Internet Plaza in Haidian District, Beijing. This company and its subsidiaries offer advertising, a search engine, on-line multiplayer gaming and other services. For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007, Sohu Inc.'s revenues increased 41% to $188.9M. Net income increased 31% to $35M. Sohu was ranked as the world's third- and twelfth-fastest growing company by Fortune in 2009 and 2010, respectively.

Swype

Swype was a virtual keyboard for touchscreen smartphones and tablets originally developed by Swype Inc., founded in 2002, where the user enters words by sliding a finger or stylus from the first letter of a word to its last letter, lifting only between words. It uses error-correction algorithms and a language model to guess the intended word. It also includes a predictive text system, handwriting and speech recognition support. Swype was first commercially available on the Samsung Omnia II running Windows Mobile, and was originally pre-loaded on specific devices.

In October 2011, Swype Inc. was acquired by Nuance Communications where the company continued its development and implemented its speech recognition algorithm, Dragon Dictation.In February 2018 Nuance announced that it had stopped development on the app and that no further updates will be made to it. The Android app was pulled from the Play Store. The iOS app was also pulled from the App Store. The trial version of Swype is not visible anymore for users in Play Store except users who have installed the app by accessing it in the installed apps part of the Play Store.

Users have to use Aptoide to download the full version of Swype.

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