Google Now

Google Now was a feature of Google Search of the Google app for Android and iOS. Google Now proactively delivered information to users to predict (based on search habits and other factors) information they may need in the form of informational cards. Google Now branding is no longer used, but the functionality continues in the Google app and its feed.[3]

Google first included Google Now in Android 4.1 ("Jelly Bean"), which launched on July 9, 2012, and the Galaxy Nexus smartphone was first to support it. The service became available for iOS on April 29, 2013, without most of its features. In 2014, Google added Now cards to the notification center in Chrome OS and in the Chrome browser. Later, however they removed the notification center entirely from Chrome.[4] Popular Science named Google Now the "Innovation of the Year" for 2012.[5]

Since 2015, Google gradually phased out reference to "Google Now" in the Google app, largely removing remaining use of "Now" in October 2016, including replacing Now cards with Feed.[6] At Google I/O 2016, Google showcased its new intelligent personal assistant Google Assistant, in some ways an evolution of Google Now. Unlike Google Now, however, Assistant can engage in two-way dialogue with the user.

Google Now
Google Now logo.webp
The Google app, featuring Now cards and voice commands
The Google app, featuring Now cards and voice commands
Original author(s)Google
Developer(s)Google
Initial releaseJuly 9, 2012
Stable release
5.5 / October 29, 2015
Operating systemAndroid 4.1+ ("Jelly Bean"), iOS 6.0+ and Chrome OS
Limited functionality in Microsoft Windows, OS X, Linux (via Google Chrome and the Google app)[1][2]
Available inEnglish
TypeIntelligent personal assistant
Websitewww.google.com/search/about/

History

In late 2011, reports surfaced that Google was enhancing its product Google Voice Search for the next version of Android. It was originally codenamed "Majel" after Majel Barrett, the wife of Gene Roddenberry and the voice of computer systems in the Star Trek franchise; it was also codenamed "assistant".[7]

On June 27, 2012, Google unveiled Google Now as part of the premier demonstration of Android 4.1 Jelly Bean at Google I/O 2012.[8]

On October 29, 2012, Google Now received an update through the Google Play Store bringing the addition of Gmail cards.[9] Google Now displays cards with information pulled from the user's Gmail account, such as flight information, package tracking information, hotel reservations and restaurant reservations (as long as the Gmail account is not a Google Apps account[10]). Other additions were movie, concert, stock and news cards based on the users location and search history. Also included was the facility to create calendar events using voice input, for instance "Make a new appointment for dinner with Steve next Thursday at 7pm".

On December 5, 2012, an update to the Google Search application brought several new features to Google Now, including cards for nearby events, searching by camera when at a museum or shop, airplane boarding passes found from e-mail (United Airlines in the first instance, more airlines followed). In addition Google Now would show cards for the weather for upcoming travel destinations, birthday reminders; and monthly summaries of biking and walking activities. New voice action features included with this update include the ability to post to Google+, song recognition capabilities, and the ability to scan bar codes.[11] However, when the Search 2.5 update hit, Google removed the "Search With Camera" feature.

On March 21, 2013, the executive Chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt, stated that Google had submitted an iOS version of Google Now to Apple for review and that the app was awaiting approval, but he later said that this was not true[12] after Apple denied this was the case. Despite this, on April 29, 2013, Google Now was made available for iOS in an update to the operating system's Google Search application.[13]

Based on Google Chrome code review on December 2012, Google Now was expected to be integrated into the desktop version of Google Chrome.[14] According to Seth Rosenblatt of CNET, it is rumored that Google Now will also serve as iGoogle's replacement in November 2013.[15] On May 15, 2013, at Google I/O 2013, Google announced the upcoming release of Google Now on desktop platforms—the feature would be accessible only via Google Chrome or Google Chrome OS.[16] On January 16, 2014, an alpha version of the Google Now was made available on desktop through the Google Chrome Canary release although this app lacks some of the cards available on mobile version of Google Now such as public alerts, nearby photos, activity summary and stocks.[1] On March 24, 2014, Google started rolling out Google Now for Google Chrome users who are signed into their Google account on the browser.[17]

Functionality

Android 6.0-en
Google Now Launcher

Google Now was implemented as an aspect of the Google Search application. It recognized repeated actions that a user performs on the device (common locations, repeated calendar appointments, search queries, etc.) to display more relevant information to the user in the form of "cards". The system leveraged Google's Knowledge Graph project, a system used to assemble more detailed search results by analyzing their meaning and connections.[8][18]

Specialized cards currently comprise:[19][20][21]

  • Activity summary (walking/cycling)
  • Birthday
  • Boarding pass
  • Concerts
  • Currency
  • Developing story and breaking news
  • Events
  • Event reminders
  • Flights
  • Friends' birthdays
  • Hotels
  • Location reminders
  • Movies
  • Nearby attractions
  • Nearby events
  • Nearby photo spots
  • New albums/books/video games/TV episodes
  • News topic
  • Next appointment
  • Packages
  • Parking location
  • Places
  • Product listing
  • Public alerts
  • Public transit
  • Research topic
  • Restaurant reservations
  • Sports
  • Stocks
  • Time to home
  • Time reminders
  • Traffic and transit
  • Translation
  • Weather
  • Website update
  • What to watch

In January 2015, Google introduced the ability for participating, installed third-party apps to generate cards; on launch, this included apps such as Airbnb, eBay, The Guardian, Pandora Radio and Lyft among others.[22]

Now on Tap

On Android 6.0 "Marshmallow", Google Now supported an additional feature known as Now On Tap, which lets a user perform searches within the context of information currently displayed in an app. When a user activates the feature, by holding the "Home" button or using a voice command, the text content of the current screen is parsed for keywords and other information (names of people, television programs and films, etc.)—which then generate cards that display related information, suggestions, and actions. Users can also voice questions related to the subjects of these cards.[23]

Reception

Scott Webster of CNET praised Google Now for its ability to remind users of events based on past location histories and check-ins, and further commended it for providing "information instantly in a clean, intuitive manner" without the user's requesting it.[24] A review by Ryan Paul of Ars Technica claims that like most other voice activated apps, including Siri, voice recognition is a major issue, but notes that the ability to type queries provides users with alternatives.[25] Some commentators noted that Google Now's predictive power[26] reveals "exactly how much data and information Google actually has about [users'] routines and daily lives."[27] An October 2014 review on Android Central showed Google Now outperforming its competition, Siri and Cortana.[28]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Summers, Nick (2014-01-16). "Google Now arrives in Chrome Canary with weather, sports scores, traffic and event reminder cards". The Next Web. Retrieved 2014-01-16.
  2. ^ Ravenscraft, Eric (2014-03-24). "Google Now Comes to Chrome, Is Out of Beta". Lifehacker. Retrieved 2014-04-03.
  3. ^ "Feed your need to know". Google. 2017-07-19. Retrieved 2018-02-08.
  4. ^ Streamlining Notifications on Desktop, Chromium Blog. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Google Now wins 'Innovation of the Year', runs laps around 'outdated' Siri". BGR. 2012-11-15. Retrieved 2012-12-26.
  6. ^ Google Now is dead: Latest beta of Search app erases references to Google Now, Retrieved 9 October 2016.
  7. ^ Webster, Scott (2011-12-15). "Google's project Majel gets more interesting by the day". CNET. Retrieved 2011-12-28.
  8. ^ a b "Google I/O Day One: Google continues attacks on Apple, Amazon". CNET. Retrieved 15 September 2012.
  9. ^ Ravenscraft, Eric (2012-10-29). "Google Search Updated, Brings New Google Now Cards And Voice Actions - Yes, You Can Set Calendar Events". Android Police. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  10. ^ "Google Now with Google for Work accounts". google.com. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  11. ^ D'Orazio, Dante (2012-12-05). "Google Now takes on Passbook, adds QR code airport check-in and camera search". The Verge. Retrieved 2012-12-05.
  12. ^ Wolfe, Bryan M. (March 22, 2013). "Both Apple and Google Confirm: No Google Now For iOS Just Yet". AppAdvice. Retrieved April 26, 2013.
  13. ^ Rosenblatt, Seth (2013-04-29). "Google Now 'talks' its way onto iOS". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2013-04-29.
  14. ^ "Issue 11412291: Creating a skeleton for Google Now for Chrome implementation". Chromium Code Review. December 2012. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  15. ^ Rosenblatt, Seth (April 22, 2013). "Google Now could be Google's new home page". CNET. Retrieved April 24, 2013.
  16. ^ Farber, Dan (May 16, 2013). "Google Now voice search arriving on the desktop". CNET. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  17. ^ Welch, Chris (March 24, 2014). "Google Now finally comes to desktop Chrome browser". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  18. ^ "Google Makes Search 'More Human' with Knowledge Graph". BBC News. May 16, 2012. Retrieved May 18, 2012.
  19. ^ Google (2013-08-22). "Google". Google. Google Inc. Retrieved 2013-08-23.
  20. ^ Limer, Eric (May 1, 2014). "Google Now Can Remember Where You Parked". Gizmodo. Gawker Media. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  21. ^ Winkler, Rolfe (May 6, 2014). "New Google Now Feature Aims at Amazon". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company. Retrieved May 9, 2014.
  22. ^ "Google Now for Android can now work with third-party apps". The Verge. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  23. ^ "Android 6.0 Marshmallow, thoroughly reviewed". Ars Technica. Conde Nast. Retrieved October 6, 2015.
  24. ^ Webster, Scott (2012-07-02). "Reading the tea leaves of Google Now". CNET. Retrieved 2012-12-26.
  25. ^ Paul, Ryan (August 13, 2012). "Review: Android's "Google Now" can teach Siri a few tricks". Arstechnica. Retrieved December 26, 2012.
  26. ^ Osinga, Douwe. "Text Messaging Service". Google.com. U.S. Patent Office.
  27. ^ Wortham, Jenna (June 28, 2012). "Will Google's Personal Assistant Be Creepy or Cool?". The New York Times. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  28. ^ Simon Sage (October 8, 2014). (King of search) Google Now voice search edges out Siri and Cortana in comparison, Android Central

External links

Asus ZenWatch

The Asus ZenWatch is an Android Wear-based smartwatch announced on September 3, 2014 at IFA and released by Asus on November 9, 2014. It uses Android Wear, a modified version of Android designed specifically for smartwatches and other wearables. ASUS also provides a custom app manager for this watch called the ZenWatch manager.

For health tracking, you can use the ASUS ZenFit app as well as other health apps including Google Fit. It is compatible with all smartphones running Android 4.3 or higher that support Bluetooth LE. Android Wear features a notification system based on Google Now technology that enables it to receive spoken commands from the user.The ZenWatch has IP55 certification for resistance to water jets. It has a user-replaceable buckle-based strap. The watch has a small power key but an always-on display.

The original ZenWatch was succeeded by the ZenWatch 2; both are square-shaped. On November 11, 2016, ASUS released the ZenWatch 3 that has a round face. One feature that distinguishes the ZenWatch 3 from many smartwatches is that you can charge it to 60% charge in only 15 minutes.

Droid MAXX

The Droid Maxx is a high end smartphone developed by Motorola Mobility. It is the first Droid to be a high end smartphone exclusively developed by Motorola for Verizon Wireless. It is part of the Verizon Droid line, and was announced on 23 July 2013 along with the Droid Ultra and Droid Mini at a joint Motorola and Verizon Wireless press conference.

The Droid Maxx maintains a similar design shape to its predecessor, the Droid Razr HD, including the Dupont Kevlar unibody form. It included Motorola's proprietary X8 Mobile Computing System, which consists of 8 cores: 2-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro applications processor, 4-core Adreno 320 graphics processor, 1 low-power core for natural language processing, and 1 low-power core for contextual awareness processing to enable the new Touchless control feature. The internal battery was increased in size to 3,500 mAh. The on-screen buttons for back, home, and multitask functions were moved to off-screen capacitive soft-keys below the screen. The Droid Maxx also includes Motorola's Active Notification feature.

Reception towards the device was mostly positive, with the caveat that the device is only available on the US carrier, Verizon Wireless. Some reviewing outlets called the device "the best Android device available on Verizon Wireless". Many others praised Motorola's Active Notification system, which turns on part of the AMOLED screen to "blink" notifications to the user, in lieu of a traditional LED notification light. The soft touch kevlar unibody as well as the overall physical design was praised as well. Reviewers were mixed to the device's continued use of a 720p HD resolution at a 5 in (130 mm) screen size, though complimented the AMOLED display's brightness, deep blacks, and its benefits to battery conservation.

Google Allo

Google Allo was an instant messaging mobile app by Google for the Android and iOS mobile operating systems, with a web client available on Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera.

The app uses phone numbers as identifiers, and allows users to exchange messages, files, voice notes and images. It includes a virtual assistant, a feature that generates automatic reply suggestions, and an optional encrypted mode known as incognito mode. Users can resize messages and add doodles and stickers on images before sending them.

Before launch, Google touted strong privacy in the app, with particular emphasis on messages stored "transiently and in non-identifiable form". However, at launch, privacy was significantly rolled back, with Google now keeping logs of messages indefinitely (or until the user deletes messages) in an effort to improve the app's "smart reply" feature.

Google Assistant

Google Assistant is an artificial intelligence-powered virtual assistant developed by Google that is primarily available on mobile and smart home devices. Unlike the company's previous virtual assistant, Google Now, Google Assistant can engage in two-way conversations.

Assistant initially debuted in May 2016 as part of Google's messaging app Allo, and its voice-activated speaker Google Home. After a period of exclusivity on the Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones, it began to be deployed on other Android devices in February 2017, including third-party smartphones and Android Wear (now Wear OS), and was released as a standalone app on the iOS operating system in May 2017. Alongside the announcement of a software development kit in April 2017, the Assistant has been, and is being, further extended to support a large variety of devices, including cars and third party smart home appliances. The functionality of the Assistant can also be enhanced by third-party developers.

In 2017, Google Assistant was installed on more than 400 million devices.Users primarily interact with Google Assistant through natural voice, though keyboard input is also supported. In the same nature and manner as Google Now, the Assistant is able to search the Internet, schedule events and alarms, adjust hardware settings on the user's device, and show information from the user's Google account. Google has also announced that the Assistant will be able to identify objects and gather visual information through the device's camera, and support purchasing products and sending money, as well as identifying songs.

At CES 2018, the first Assistant-powered smart displays (smart speakers with video screens) were announced, with the first one being released in July 2018.

Google Home

Google Home is a brand of smart speakers developed by Google. The first device was announced in May 2016 and released in the United States in November 2016, with subsequent releases globally throughout 2017 and 2018.

Google Home speakers enable users to speak voice commands to interact with services through Google's personal assistant software called Google Assistant. A large number of services, both in-house and third-party, are integrated, allowing users to listen to music, control playback of videos or photos, or receive news updates entirely by voice. Google Home devices also have integrated support for home automation, letting users control smart home appliances with their voice. Multiple Google Home devices can be placed in different rooms in a home for synchronized playback of music. An update in April 2017 brought multi-user support, allowing the device to distinguish between up to six people by voice. In May 2017, Google announced multiple updates to Google Home's functionality, including: free hands-free phone calling in the United States and Canada; proactive updates ahead of scheduled events; visual responses on mobile devices or Chromecast-enabled televisions; Bluetooth audio streaming; and the ability to add reminders and calendar appointments.

The original Google Home has a cylindrical shape with colored status LEDs on the top for visual representation of its status. The cover over its base is modular, with different color options available through the Google Store for matching with home decor. In October 2017, Google announced two additions to the product lineup, the miniature puck-shaped Google Home Mini and the larger Google Home Max. In October 2018, the company released the Google Home Hub, a smart speaker with a touchscreen video display.

Google Keep

Google Keep is a note-taking service developed by Google. Launched on March 20, 2013, Google Keep is available on the web, and has mobile apps for the Android and iOS mobile operating systems. Keep offers a variety of tools for taking notes, including text, lists, images, and audio. Users can set reminders, which are integrated with Google Now. Text from images can be extracted using optical character recognition, and voice recordings can be transcribed. The interface allows for a single-column view or a multi-column view. Notes can be color-coded, and labels can be applied for organization. Later updates have added functionality to pin notes, and to collaborate on notes with other Keep users in real-time.

Google Keep has received mixed reviews. A review just after launch in 2013 praised its speed, the quality of voice notes, synchronization, and the widget that could be placed on the Android home screen. Reviews in 2016 have criticized the lack of formatting options, inability to undo changes, and an interface that only offers two view modes where neither was liked for their handling of long notes. However, Google Keep received praise for features including universal device access, native integration with other Google services, and the option to turn photos into text through optical character recognition.

Google Play Music

Google Play Music is a music and podcast streaming service and online music locker operated by Google. The service was announced on May 10, 2011, and after a six-month, invitation-only beta period, it was publicly launched on November 16, 2011.

Users with standard accounts can upload and listen to up to 50,000 songs from their personal libraries at no cost. A paid Google Play Music subscription entitles users to on-demand streaming of any song in the Google Play Music catalog, as well as access to YouTube Music Premium. Users in Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom also have access to YouTube Premium. Users can purchase additional tracks for their library through the music store section of Google Play. In addition to offering music streaming for Internet-connected devices, the Google Play Music mobile apps allow music to be stored and listened to offline.

Google Voice Search

Google Voice Search or Search by Voice is a Google product that allows users to use Google Search by speaking on a mobile phone or computer, i.e. have the device search for data upon entering information on what to search into the device by speaking.

Initially named as Voice Action which allowed one to give speech commands to an Android phone. Once only available for the U.S. English locale – commands were later recognizable and replied to in American, British, and Indian English; French, Italian, German, and Spanish.In Android 4.1+ (Jelly Bean), it was merged with Google Now.

In August 2014, a new feature was added to Google Voice Search, allowing users to choose up to five languages and the app will automatically understand the spoken language.

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck is an American English-language tongue-twister. The woodchuck from the Algonquian word "wejack" is a kind of marmot regionally called a groundhog. The complete beginning of the tongue-twister usually goes: "How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?" The tongue-twister relies primarily on alliteration to achieve its effects, with five "w" sounds interspersed among five "ch" sounds, as well as 6 "ood" sounds.

List of Google apps for Android

e Google Play Store, although some may not show up in search results if they are listed as incompatible with your device (even though they may still function from an *.apk). Some of Google's apps may be pre-installed on some devices, depending upon the device manufacturer and the version of Android. A few of these apps, such as Gboard, are not supported on older versions of Android.

Lyrics

Lyrics are words that make up a song usually consisting of verses and choruses. The writer of lyrics is a lyricist. The words to an extended musical composition such as an opera are, however, usually known as a "libretto" and their writer, as a "librettist". The meaning of lyrics can either be explicit or implicit. Some lyrics are abstract, almost unintelligible, and, in such cases, their explication emphasizes form, articulation, meter, and symmetry of expression. Rappers can also create lyrics (often with a variation of rhyming words) that are meant to be spoken rhythmically rather than sung.

Material Design

Material Design (codenamed Quantum Paper) is a design language that Google developed in 2014. Expanding on the "card" motifs that debuted in Google Now, Material Design uses more grid-based layouts, responsive animations and transitions, padding, and depth effects such as lighting and shadows.

Google announced Material Design on June 25, 2014, at the 2014 Google I/O conference.

Meru Cabs

Meru Cabs is a ride hailing company based in Mumbai, India. It provides cab booking facilities through calls, website, Messenger bot on Facebook, Google Maps or through their mobile application and accepts payments through cash or multiple wallet options. Meru Cabs integrated their cab service with Google Now which will send passengers reminders for cab pickups, alerting them if they wish to book a cab based on their location and other information through Now Cards within the Google app.

Nexus 10

The Nexus 10 is a tablet computer co-developed by Google and Samsung Electronics that runs the Android operating system. It is the second tablet in the Google Nexus series, a family of Android consumer devices marketed by Google and built by an OEM partner. Following the success of the 7-inch Nexus 7, the first Google Nexus tablet, the Nexus 10 was released with a 10.1-inch, 2560×1600 pixel display, which was the world's highest resolution tablet display at the time of its release. The Nexus 10 was announced on October 29, 2012, and became available on November 13, 2012.

The device is available in two storage sizes, 16 GB for US$399 and 32 GB for US$499. Along with the Nexus 4 mobile phone, the Nexus 10 launched Android 4.2 ("Jelly Bean"), which offered several new features, such as: 360° panoramic photo stitching called "Photo Sphere"; a quick settings menu; widgets on the lock screen; gesture typing; an updated version of Google Now; and multiple user accounts for tablets.

Google revealed the device on October 29, 2012 to mixed-to-favorable reactions. Due to high demand, the device quickly sold out through the Google Play Store. Since its release, the device has gone through three major software updates and is currently upgradable to Android 5.1 ("Lollipop"). Official software support for Android versions after 5.1 will not be offered; however, security patches will be provided at least 3 years after the release of the device

Nexus 4

The Nexus 4 (codenamed Mako) is an Android smartphone co-developed by Google and LG Electronics. It is the fourth smartphone in the Google Nexus product family, unveiled on October 29, 2012, and released on November 13, 2012, and succeeded the Samsung-manufactured Galaxy Nexus. As with other Nexus devices, the Nexus 4 was sold unlocked through Google Play, but was also retailed by wireless carriers.

Based upon the hardware of the LG Optimus G, the Nexus 4 was distinguished from its predecessor by a quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, an 8 megapixel rear camera and 1.3 megapixel front camera which use the Sony BSI sensor, Qi wireless charging, and the introduction of Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, an update to the operating system which introduced 360-degree spherical photo stitching called "Photo Sphere", a quick settings menu, widgets on the lock screen, gesture typing, and an updated version of Google Now.

The Nexus 4 was met with generally positive reviews from critics, who praised the quality and performance of the Nexus 4's hardware. It was also the first Google Nexus device to be released at a relatively lower outright price in comparison to other high-end/flagship smartphones, leading to unexpected high demand and supply shortages. However, the device was criticized for its lack of LTE support, and its lack of a user-removable battery which its predecessor, the Galaxy Nexus, included.

Nexus 5

Nexus 5 (codenamed Hammerhead) is an Android smartphone manufactured by LG Electronics for Google. Co-developed with and marketed by Google Inc. as part of its Nexus line of flagship devices and unveiled on October 31, 2013, the Nexus 5 served as the launch device for Android 4.4 "KitKat", which introduced a refreshed interface, performance improvements, increased Google Now integration, better battery life and other features.

The Nexus 5 received mostly positive reviews, praising the device's balance of overall performance and cost in comparison to other "flagship" phones, along with the quality of its display and some of the changes introduced by Android 4.4. The display was, however, criticized for being too dim in comparison to other devices, and the camera was criticized for having inconsistent quality.

Directly succeeding the Nexus 4, the Nexus 5 was followed by the Nexus 6 in late 2014 and then the Nexus 5X, the latter being more of a direct successor to the Nexus 5.

Nexus 5X

Nexus 5X (codenamed bullhead) is an Android smartphone manufactured by LG Electronics, co-developed with and marketed by Google as part of its Nexus line of flagship devices. Unveiled on September 29, 2015, it is a successor to the Nexus 5. The phone, along with the Nexus 6P, served as launch devices for Android 6.0 Marshmallow, which introduced a refreshed interface, performance improvements, increased Google Now integration, and other new features.The phone was widely praised by reviewers on release, although many devices later began experiencing spontaneous unrecoverable bootloops.

On October 4, 2016, Google presented its successor, the Google Pixel; the same day, the Nexus 5X was discontinued and removed from the Google Store.

Nexus 6P

Nexus 6P (codenamed Angler) is an Android smartphone developed and marketed by Google and manufactured by Huawei. It succeeded the Nexus 6 as the flagship device of the Nexus line of Android devices by Google. Officially unveiled on 29 September 2015 along with the Nexus 5X at the Google Nexus 2015 press event held in San Francisco, it was made available for pre-order on the same day in United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Japan.

Significant changes over previous Nexus devices include an all-aluminum based body that is thinner and lighter than the Nexus 6, a rear fingerprint reader called Nexus Imprint, a faster octa-core Snapdragon 810 v2.1 system-on-chip (SoC), an AMOLED display, better cameras, enhanced LTE connectivity, a reversible USB-C dock connector, and the removal of wireless charging. The Nexus 6P was also the first Nexus device to be available with 128 GB of internal storage, as well as the first Nexus device to be offered with a gold color option.

The Nexus 6P serves as a launch device for Android 6.0 Marshmallow which introduces a refreshed interface, performance and battery life improvements, Google Now on Tap integration, a fine-grained permission model, fingerprint verification, and other new features. On 4 October 2016, Google presented its successor, the Google Pixel.

Nexus 7 (2012)

The first-generation Nexus 7 is a mini tablet computer co-developed by Google and Asus that runs the Android operating system. It is the first tablet in the Google Nexus series of Android consumer devices marketed by Google and built by an original equipment manufacturer partner. The Nexus 7 features a 7-inch (180 mm) display, an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core chip, 1 GB of memory, Wi-Fi and near field communication connectivity, and 8, 16 or 32 GB of storage. The tablet was the first device to ship with version 4.1 of Android, nicknamed "Jelly Bean". By emphasizing the integration of the Google Play multimedia store with Android 4.1, Google intended to market the Nexus 7 as an entertainment device and a platform for consuming e-books, television shows, films, games, and music.

Design work on the Nexus 7 began in January 2012 after a meeting between Google and Asus executives at International CES. The device's design was based on Asus' Eee Pad MeMO ME370T tablet that had been showcased at the conference. Following a hectic four-month development period during which the device was modified to reach a US$199 price point, mass production started in May. It was unveiled at the Google I/O annual developer conference on June 27, when it also became available for pre-order through Google Play. Shipping commenced in mid-July 2012 to Australia, Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom, before the tablet was progressively released in other regions. Google expanded the Nexus 7 lineup in October 2012 with the introduction of 32 GB versions, available in Wi-Fi–only and HSPA+ cellular-ready varieties.

The Nexus 7 received positive reviews from critics, particularly for its competitive pricing, premium-quality build, and powerful hardware. Common criticisms included the absence of cellular connectivity from initial models and no expandable storage. The Nexus 7 has been commercially successful, selling approximately 4.5–4.6 million units in 2012 and 7 million units overall. It received honors for "Gadget of the Year" and "Tablet of the Year" in T3 magazine's 2012 awards, and was also named "Best Mobile Tablet" at the 2013 Global Mobile Awards. The second generation Nexus 7 was released on July 26, 2013.

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