Google News Archive

Google News Archive is an extension of Google News providing free access to scanned archives of newspapers and links to other newspaper archives on the web, both free and paid.

Some of the news archives date back to 18th century. There is a timeline view available, to select news from various years.

Google News Archive
Google-News logo
Type of site
Newspaper archive
Available inEnglish, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Dutch, Arabic, Hebrew, Norwegian, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Greek, Russian, Hindi, Telugu, Tamil, Turkish, and Malayalam.
Dissolvedyes
Created byGoogle
Websitenews.google.com/newspapers
RegistrationNot required
LaunchedJune 6, 2006
Current statusScanning project discontinued; search function "facelift" is "in the works"

History

The archive went live on June 6, 2006, after Google acquired PaperofRecord.com, originally created by Robert J. Huggins and his team at Cold North Wind, Inc. The acquisition was not publicly announced by Cold North Wind until 2008.

While the service initially provided a simple index of other web pages, on September 8, 2008, Google News began to offer indexed content from scanned newspapers.[1] The depth of chronological coverage varies. Since 2008, the entire content of The New York Times back to its founding in 1851 has been available.

Newspapers were thought to have escaped copyright obligations of news articles because of Google's method of publishing the archives as searchable image files of the actual newspaper pages, rather than as pure text of articles.

In 2011, Google announced that it would no longer add content to the archive project.[2] On August 14, 2011, without notice, Google made the News Archives home page unavailable. Apparently, the service merged with Google News.[3] Carly Carlioi, an editor at the Boston Phoenix, speculated that Google discontinued the project because they found it harder than expected, for newspapers were more difficult to index than books because of layout complexities.[4] Another cause might have been that the project attracted a lesser audience than expected.

While archived newspapers[5] are still available for browsing, keyword searching is not fully functional. On December 16, 2013, Google News employee Stacie Chan wrote in the Google Product Forums that Google News is "performing a much needed facelift on our News Archive search function", and that access to archived stories would be limited for several months while "this new system" is being built.[6] This was reaffirmed on May 22 and July 30, 2014, when Chan wrote that Google is still "working on the archives to provide a better user experience",[7] and "it's in the works",[8] and again on December 18, 2014, when Chan wrote that Google "is currently working on creating a better experience on the Newspaper Archives that should be available in the near future."[9]

Some papers formerly included in the News Archive have been removed because of copyright issues. For instance, the archives of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel disappeared on August 16, 2016, due to a contract between the paper's owner, the Gannett Company, and NewsBank, inc.,[10] although the archives were eventually restored.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bringing history online, one newspaper at a time". Google. September 8, 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-08. Today, we're launching an initiative to make more old newspapers accessible and searchable online by partnering with newspaper publishers to digitize millions of pages of news archives.
  2. ^ Horn, Leslie (May 20, 2011). "Google Ending Newspaper Archiving Project". PC Magazine. Retrieved 2011-05-20. According to the Boston Phoenix, a paper that has been archived through the project, Google sent participants an email on Thursday informing them of its plans. Google told the paper it will shift its focus to "newer projects that help the industry, such as Google One Pass, a platform that enables publishers to sell content and subscriptions directly from their own sites."
  3. ^ "Google Integrates News Archive Search Into Current News Search, Weakens Archive Search". Internet for Lawyers
  4. ^ Jared Keller (May 20, 2011). "Google Shuts Down Newspaper Archive Project". The Atlantic.
  5. ^ "Google News Archive Search".
  6. ^ C., Stacie (December 16, 2013). "Google News Archive update". Google Product Forums. Retrieved 2013-12-17.
  7. ^ C., Stacie (May 22, 2014). "Google News Archive Search update..." Google Product Forums. Retrieved 2014-05-22.
  8. ^ C., Stacie (August 10, 2014). "Google News Archive Search update..." Google Product Forums. Retrieved 2014-08-10.
  9. ^ C., Stacie (December 18, 2014). "Google News Archive Search update..." Google Product Forums. Retrieved 2015-06-23.
  10. ^ Takach, Michail (August 19, 2016). "Journal Sentinel Archive Disappears". Urban Milwaukee. Retrieved 2016-08-20.

External links

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