Google My Business

Google My Business is an Internet-based service for business owners and operated by Google. The network launched in June 2014[1] as a way of giving business owners more control of what shows in the search results when someone searches a given business name. Google allows business owners to verify their own business data via creating a new profile or claiming an existing auto-generated profile.[2] The Google My Business listing appears in the Google Maps section of Google as well as the "Local Pack" for qualifying search queries.

Google My Business
Available inEnglish
Founded2016
IndustryTechnology
Websitewww.google.com/business/
Current statusActive

Features

Edit Information

Google My Business allows business owners to supply information that can show up in a Google search, such as open hours, address, phone number, and photos.[3] Google may combine the information provided by businesses with information from other sources, including a business's own website, Google user contributions, and third party websites.[4] The service is free.[5]

Website

Google My Business allows businesses to create a website at no cost.[6]

Reviews

Customers can review businesses and business owners can respond to reviews.[7]

Posts

Google My Business allows business owners to post updates about announcements or sales. There are currently 4 different post types:[8] What's New, Events, Product, and Offer.

On each post type, users can add a description, photo or video, and link. They can also add an optional Call-To-Action button to posts. The Call-To-Action buttons options are Book, Buy, Order Online, Learn More, and Sign Up.

Posts show up in Google search results. However, most post types expire after seven days, no longer showing in search results at that time. There is one exception: event posts expire when the event date the post referenced has passed.[9]

In October 2017, the Google My Business API was expanded[10] to allow third-party tools to schedule posts in advanced, similar to scheduling tools for social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Only a few services currently support Google My Business post scheduling, including OneUp, dlvr.it, and Sendible.

Pictures and Video

Business owners are able to upload pictures and videos to a company's Google My Business.[11] Business owners can choose to upload a logo and header images, as well as tag photos for specific industry categories such as Food, Team, Interior, Exterior, etc. Customers can also add photos to the Google My Business by attaching them to reviews.

References

  1. ^ Consultant, Ron Hanson, Post Bulletin Senior Media. "A Brief History of Google My Business". PostBulletin.com. Retrieved 2019-02-06.
  2. ^ "Phone and Text Verification on Google Maps". Chaddo.com. June 7, 2017. Archived from the original on January 3, 2018. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  3. ^ "Edit your business listing on Google". support.google.com. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  4. ^ "How Google uses business information". support.google.com. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  5. ^ "FAQs". Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  6. ^ "Create a free website for your business in minutes". Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  7. ^ "Read and reply to reviews". support.google.com. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  8. ^ "About Posts - Google My Business Help". support.google.com. Retrieved 2019-02-06.
  9. ^ Schwartz, Barry. "Google Posts are removed after 7 days, with one exception". Search Engine Land. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  10. ^ "Google Posts can now be automated with new API support". Search Engine Land. 2017-10-16. Retrieved 2019-02-06.
  11. ^ "Add local business photos or videos". https://support.google.com. External link in |website= (help)

External links

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