Google Express

Google Express, formerly Google Shopping Express,[1] is a shopping service from Google available in some parts of the United States that was launched on a free trial basis across the San Francisco Peninsula. Originally it was a same-day service.[2] It later expanded to same-day and overnight delivery.[3] Originally pricing was the same as in-person shopping, but later increased to the point where prices are typically US$4-$10 more per item; Google Express Help said, "Because item prices are set by stores, sometimes you'll see prices on Google Express that differ from what you'd see in the store: this depends both on the merchant and the location of the store your items come from."[4]

The service was first announced in March 2013, from San Francisco as far south as San Jose. Retailers include a mix of national and local stores.[5][6][7] It was publicly launched on September 25, 2013, with some added retailers but still restricted to San Francisco and Silicon Valley.[8] Apps for Android and Apple smartphones were announced the same day; using these enables customers to use their loyalty accounts.[9] In May 2014 the service was expanded to New York City and West Los Angeles,[10][11] and in October 2014 service was added in Chicago, Boston, and Washington, DC, as well as additional retailers.[1][12]

At launch, Google waived the subscription fee for testers and for the first six months after sign-up;[10][11] the fee is somewhat below that for Amazon Prime. Amazon, which is also testing same-day delivery in selected markets, is the main competitor.[6][7][13][14][15] Delivery began with Prius sedans in Google Express livery, about 50 cars as of August 2013, when the service was available in 88 ZIP codes.[16] The fleet was later expanded to include Ford Transit vans,[17] and the company announced it might use bicycle and on-foot delivery in some areas.[18] The deliveries are subcontracted to a courier service, initially 1-800-Courier,[19] and later also OnTrac. In the testing phase, retailers were not charged, or paid only a nominal fee. Customers pay $5 per shopping stop and receive deliveries within a three- to five-hour window.[15][16] Customers must have a Google Pay account.[16][20]

The service displays a map of the merchandise pickup and delivery locations, and attempts to use the nearest available outlet, [15][16] although not always successfully.[19][21]

In October 2017, merchant partners included Walmart,[22] Target Corporation,[23] Costco, and Fry's Electronics.

Google Shopping Express car 1
Google Shopping Express vehicle, original livery
Google Shopping Express car 2
Google Shopping Express vehicle, newer livery

See also

Google-express-shopping-mod-apk-free-download/==References==

  1. ^ a b Sarah Perez, "Google Shopping Express Expands To More Cities, Rebrands As Google Express", TechCrunch, October 14, 2014.
  2. ^ Perez, Sarah (September 25, 2013). "Google Shopping Express Launches In San Francisco Peninsula, Debuts New Apps". TechCrunch.
  3. ^ Perez, Sarah (October 25, 2016). "Google Express expands, now reaches 90 percent of U.S." TechCrunch.
  4. ^ "Pricing". Google Express Help. 2017. Retrieved September 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Salvador Rodriguez (March 28, 2013). "Google testing same-day delivery service". Los Angeles Times.
  6. ^ a b Iain Thomson (March 28, 2013). "Google Shopping Express dips toe in same-day home delivery: Wants to ape Amazon and eBay, not Webvan or Kozmo". The Register.
  7. ^ a b Joanna Stern (March 29, 2013). "Google Shopping Express: Same-Day Delivery Beyond the Web", Technology, ABC News blogs.
  8. ^ Heather Somerville (September 25, 2013). "Google same-day delivery makes public debut". The Mercury News.
  9. ^ Sarah Perez, "Google Shopping Express Launches In San Francisco Peninsula, Debuts New Apps". TechCrunch. September 25, 2013.
  10. ^ a b Alison Griswold, "Google Shopping Express Is Making a Masterful Play for Amazon’s Customers", Moneybox, Slate, May 5, 2014.
  11. ^ a b Alistair Barr, "In Battle with Amazon, Google Expands Same-Day Delivery Service", Blogs, Wall Street Journal, May 5, 2014.
  12. ^ Brian Elliot, "Google Express: more cities, more stores and a new name", Official Google blog, Oct 13, 2014.
  13. ^ Alexia Tsotsis, "Google Starts Testing Google Shopping Express In SF, With Free Delivery From Target, Walgreens, Staples And More", TechCrunch, March 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Dan Reyes, "Google Shopping Express May Rival Amazon and eBay", Technorati, March 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b c Farhad Manjoo, "The Glorious Future of Shopping: You order online. Your stuff comes the same day. You never have to leave your house again", Technology, Slate, June 30, 2013.
  16. ^ a b c d Heather Somerville, "Google puts pressure on eBay, expands same-day delivery", Business, Mercury News, August 30, 2013.
  17. ^ Erin Connolly (October 15, 2014). "Here’s What You Need to Know Now That Google Express is in Town". Boston.com.
  18. ^ Kaja Whitehouse, "Google expands same-day delivery service to Manhattan, LA", The New York Post, May 5, 2014.
  19. ^ a b Cyrus Farivar, "Google Shopping Express expands old formula: Take orders, deliver stuff (mostly): In which an Ars editor makes three orders in San Jose, but two actually show up", Business, Ars Technica, September 25, 2013.
  20. ^ Shana Lynch (September 25, 2013). "Google Shopping Express versus eBay Now: Who won?" Silicon Valley Business Journal.
  21. ^ Kevin Shalvey (June 5, 2013). "Google Shopping Express Test: Same-Day Bagels", Investor's Business Daily.
  22. ^ Green, Dennis (23 August 2017). "Google and Walmart are joining forces to take on Amazon". Business Insider. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  23. ^ Gagliordi, Natalie (12 October 2017). "Target partners with Google for voice shopping through Google Express". ZDNet. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 13 October 2017.

External links

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