Goldenheart

Goldenheart is the second studio album by American singer Dawn Richard. It was released on January 15, 2013, by Our Dawn Entertainment. After Richard's group Diddy – Dirty Money disbanded in 2012, the singer continued to develop her musical identity and worked with creative partner and manager Andrew "Druski" Scott, who co-wrote Goldenheart with her. It is the first in a trilogy of albums by Richard about love, loss, and redemption.

Goldenheart is an eccentric R&B album that draws on dream pop, alternative, and dance genres. Its mostly midtempo songs have strong grooves and feature synthesizers, string settings, vintage keyboards, and an array of percussive sounds. A post-breakup concept album, Richard's songwriting poses relationships and personal subjects as epic tales through magical, medieval imagery and allusions to high fantasy and science fiction tropes.

The album was released independently by Richard and promoted with the lead single "'86". It debuted at number 137 on the Billboard 200 chart and sold 3,000 copies in its first week. Upon its release, Goldenheart received universal acclaim from music critics, who praised its grand musical scope and Richard's theatrical personality.

Goldenheart
Dawnrichard goldenheart
Studio album by
ReleasedJanuary 15, 2013
GenreAlternative R&B, contemporary R&B, pop
Length62:35
LabelOur Dawn
ProducerAndrew "Druski" Scott, Deonte, The Fisticuffs
Dawn Richard chronology
Whiteout
(2012)
Goldenheart
(2013)
Blackheart
(2015)
Singles from Goldenheart
  1. "'86"
    Released: September 26, 2012

Background

During stints in different musical groups, Dawn Richard wanted to develop her musical identity and pursue a solo recording career. In 2011, Richard was promoting the album Last Train to Paris (2010) as a member of Sean Combs' musical project Diddy – Dirty Money and released a free mixtape, The Prelude to A Tell Tale Heart, which registered one million downloads within a month. After the group disbanded in 2012, she worked with producer, manager, and creative partner Andrew "Druski" Scott and released her EP Armor On, which sold 30,000 copies. Richard also marketed herself through social media and self-funded music videos on YouTube.[1] Goldenheart is the first release in a trilogy of albums by Richard about love, loss, and redemption,[2] followed by Blackheart (2015) and Redemption (2016).[1] She wrote songs for the albums over the course of six years. Some were written as ten-minute songs and instrumentals, but Richard edited them down to avoid being "long-winded" and "overwhelming".[3]

Musical style

Goldenheart has an eccentric, dreamy musical style that incorporates spare, reverberating beats, icy synthesizers, and dream pop textures.[6] Allmusic's Andy Kellman characterizes its music as "largely pop-oriented contemporary R&B",[7] while Jesse Cataldo from Slant Magazine finds it to be "aligned with an intensifying style of alternative R&B ... in which albums are intricately structured and thematic."[6] Marcus Holmlund of Interview observes an "atmospheric aesthetic" that blends "alternative listens like Björk and Imogen Heap with 80s pop (à la Phil Collins and Prince)". Richard, who grew up listening to Collins, Prince, Genesis, Cyndi Lauper, and Peter Gabriel, cites the song "'86" as most exemplary of those influences on the album.[8] Goldenheart also draws heavily on dance music.[9] Its melodic urban contemporary sound incorporates elements of electro, house,[5] and European dance-pop.[7] The ambient,[10] 2-step "In Your Eyes" and "Riot" both have euphoric house climaxes.[11] "Pretty Wicked Things" features an industrialized, dubstep production,[9] with jerky basslines and pitch-shifted vocals.[12]

Andrew "Druski" Scott's production on Goldenheart incorporates synth pads, string settings, vintage keyboards, and varied beats.[5] Music writers compare Scott's partnership with Richard on the album to producer Brian Eno's work with David Bowie during the latter's "Berlin" period;[13] Jonathan Bogart of The Atlantic writes that Scott serves a similar role by "creating dense soundscapes for [Richard's] often electronically altered voice to glide over, wash through, soar in, and pierce with sudden emotion."[14] The maximalist production of the opening song "In the Hearts Tonight" begins with 45 seconds of both staccato and tremolo strings, solo flute, and a ringing harpsichord line that coalesce with various self-harmonising voices.[12] The album's closing title track, a meditation on nostalgia built around Claude Debussy's "Clair de Lune", is solely performed with electronically altered voice and piano.[14] Richard's singing veers from restraint to expressions of yearning, with a quavering timbre.[15] "Return of the Queen" posits Richard's virtuosic vocal undulations against trip hop and operatic flourishes.[13]

The songs are mostly midtempo,[9] have strong grooves,[5] and occasionally emphasize drums,[8] with various percussive sounds that include bass drums, handclaps, and timpanis.[7] Beginning with an eerie music box loop,[12] "Northern Lights" builds gradually over a drum machine beat[6] and layered, stereo-panning handclaps.[11] The handclaps and drum loop that are buried in the mix of "Gleaux" yield an urgent half-time tremor and obscure chamber strings.[12] The drumming on Goldenheart has a tribal, African-influenced sound, which Richard attributes to the music of her native New Orleans: "It's that marching band, second-line music, that Creole-influence in the kick, and the snare that drives everything for me."[8] The album is bookended by stately marches in "Return of a Queen" and "[300]".[11] "In Your Eyes" was inspired by the Peter Gabriel song of the same name, which Richard felt had a calypso and South African vibe.[8] Steven Hyden observes several "hallmarks of '70s prog and '80s soft rock" other than the influence of Gabriel's "art-school deconstructions of classic '60s soul", including Goldenheart's Roxy Music-esque album cover.[13]

Themes

Goldenheart is a post-breakup concept album that explores themes of imagination and dreams.[6] In discussing trials of relationships, it portrays personal subjects as epic tales of battle and salvation.[9] Gerrick D. Kennedy of the Los Angeles Times writes that its stories of romantic and professional heartbreak are "tightly intertwined through Richard's imagery".[1] Her lyrics employ religious imagery, battle motifs,[11] and allusions to high fantasy and science fiction tropes, including heroic last stands, world-dominating empires, parted oceans, starflights, vampiric lovers, and military deployment, all used as metaphors for internal landscape and personal conflict.[14] "Northern Lights" and "Frequency" feature space travel and cybernetic imagery, respectively,[14] with the latter song featuring bandwidth references such as "your signal's found a home" and "stimulation makes it flow".[5] Jesse Cataldo from Slant Magazine observes "a kind of feverish mysticism" on the album, which he views is "concerned with magical imagery and the self-restorative properties of the human heart."[6] "'86" is titled after the slang term and is about ridding oneself of barriers.[8]

Richard views the album as her take on medieval literature, but calls her lyrics less "literal" than contemporary pop music.[8] Lyrically, she portrays herself as an embattled queen in acts of guarding, fighting, surrendering, and conquering.[7] She murmurs in the intro to "Warfaire", "I fight a battle every day, against discouragement and fear ... I must forever be on guard."[9] The track's misspelled title is taken from the television series Game of Thrones.[13] On "Goliath", she declares, "I faced the Beast with my bare hands".[11] "Gleaux" is an eccentric spelling of "glow", referring to what the narrator wants to do with her lover to see each other in the night.[5] "Tug of War" concludes a conflicted quest for dominance at the expense of a lover's power.[9] On the power ballad "Break of Dawn",[16] Richard promises herself and a love interest that he will "never see the break of dawn".[5] Richard, who wanted the album to end on a "hopeful" note, said that the title track "speaks of the fairytale. That naïveté. That moment where you felt anything is possible."[17] According to Laurie Tuffrey of The Quietus, the song concludes Goldenheart's lyrical arc with a "wistful retrospect" on a relationship that began with Richard's declaring her "champion" on "In the Hearts Tonight" and shifted to "Tug of War", where she became "her own champion".[12]

Release and promotion

Originally intended for release in October 2012, Richard delayed Goldenheart's release after signing a distribution deal with independent company Altavoz Distribution, which would release physical copies to retailers,[1] and provide a wider marketing reach.[5] The album's lead single,[18] "'86", was released as a digital download on September 26.[19]

Goldenheart was released in the United States on January 15, 2013.[20] Richard released the album independently, as she felt record labels were "taking a bit longer than we want".[1] It sold 3,000 copies in its first week and debuted at number 137 on the Billboard 200, number 2 on the Top Heatseekers Albums,[21] and number 68 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums.[22] The album also reached the top of the iTunes Store's R&B chart, which prompted music retailer f.y.e. to preemptively release its physical CD.[21]

Critical reception

Goldenheart received widespread acclaim from critics,[2] some of whom hailed Richard as one of the best new acts in pop and R&B.[13] At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream publications, the album received an average score of 81, based on nine reviews.[2]

In a five-star review, Alex Macpherson from The Guardian called Goldenheart "dazzling and imperious" because of how Richard's "array of sonic weapons matches her epic, elemental vision.[11] Jason Gubbels of Spin praised her eclectic music and versatile singing, which he credited for "springing finely placed surprises on listeners lulled into reverie, navigating tricky spots just effortlessly enough to mask her mastery".[5] Writing for NPR, Ann Powers found it altogether contemplative, joyful, and mythological.[23] Jonathan Bogart of The Atlantic wrote that, with her Tolkien-inspired lyrics, Richard "remains true to the oldest and most important standards of R&B, which, more than any other musical genre, charts the uncountable intricacies of the human heart."[14] Grantland critic Steven Hyden felt that the album blurs R&B conventions like Frank Ocean's Channel Orange (2012) and Janelle Monáe's The ArchAndroid (2010),[13] while Laurie Tuffrey from The Quietus said Richard distinguishes herself from her R&B contemporaries with her exceptional creativity.[12] Giving it four-and-a-half stars, AllMusic's Andy Kellman called Goldenheart "sumptuous and grand" with enough exceptional songs to compensate for its intensity and indulgence.[7] Pitchfork critic Andrew Ryce called Richard's aptitude for theatricality "unparalleled" and wrote that her slightly "hammy" but "earnest personality both endears and empowers her work."[9]

Some reviewers were more critical. Slant Magazine's Jesse Cataldo gave Goldenheart three stars and wrote that, despite its interesting "musical palette and tenacious personality", Richard "falls back on the same tired tropes that have made many conventional R&B acts feel so exhaustingly familiar."[6] Ryan B. Patrick of Exclaim! found the album's lyrics uninspired and wrote that it "functions as a hypnotic aural distraction, but little more."[16] Ben Ratliff of The New York Times characterized Goldenheart as "oddball R&B ... at times mawkish, plodding, self-obsessed, gothy, campy, filmic", and mused, "Is it good? I don't know about that. But it has the dissonant attraction of something ventured. And it's confident enough to sound normal."[10]

Track listing

All songs were produced by Andrew "Druski" Scott, except where noted.

No.TitleLyricsMusicLength
1."Intro (In the Hearts Tonight)"Dawn Richard, Andrew "Druski" ScottScott3:12
2."Return of a Queen"Richard, ScottScott4:27
3."Goliath"Richard, ScottScott2:30
4."Riot"Richard, ScottScott3:32
5."Gleaux" (produced by Andrew "Druski" Scott and Deonte)RichardDeonte Rogers, Scott4:43
6."Pretty Wicked Things"Richard, ScottScott4:32
7."Northern Lights"ScottScott3:43
8."Frequency"Richard, ScottScott3:15
9."Warfaire"Carla Carter, Richard, ScottScott3:19
10."Tug of War" (produced by The Fisticuffs)RichardMac Robinson, Brian Warfield3:58
11."Ode to You"Carter, RichardScott4:14
12."'86"Carter, Richard, ScottScott3:22
13."In Your Eyes"Richard, ScottScott3:30
14."Break of Dawn"Rosina Russell, ScottScott6:00
15."[300]"Carter, ScottScott4:15
16."Goldenheart"RichardClaude Debussy,[A] Scott5:15

Personnel

Credits adapted from Metacritic.[2]

  • Andrew "Druski" Scott – producer
  • Dawn Richard – vocals
  • Deonte – producer
  • The Fisticuffs – producer

Charts

Chart (2013) Peak
position
UK Independent Albums Breakers[25] 16
US Billboard 200[21] 137
US Independent Albums[26] 21
US Top Heatseekers Albums[21] 2
US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums[26] 7

Release history

Region Date Label Format
United Kingdom[27] January 15, 2013 Our Dawn Entertainment digital download
United States[28]
United States[29] January 22, 2013 CD
United Kingdom[30] February 11, 2013 Altavoz c/o Planetworks

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Kennedy, Gerrick D. (January 22, 2013). "Dawn Richard goes solo and hits a high note with 'GoldenHeart'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d "Goldenheart Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  3. ^ Tuffrey, Laurie (March 14, 2013). "Against The Grain: Dawn Richard Discusses Her "Sci-Fi" R&B". The Quietus. Archived from the original on March 27, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  4. ^ "Dawn Richard - Gleaux - Listen". DJBooth. Archived from the original on February 3, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Gubbels, Jason (January 16, 2013). "Dawn Richard, 'GoldenHeart' (Altavoz)". Spin. New York. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Cataldo, Jesse (January 12, 2013). "Dawn Richard: Goldenheart". Slant Magazine. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e Kellman, Andy. "Goldenheart - Dawn Richard". Allmusic. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Holmlund, Marcus (September 2012). "Exclusive Song Premiere and Interview: '86,' Dawn Richard". Interview. New York. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Ryce, Andrew (January 23, 2013). "Dawn Richard: Goldenheart". Pitchfork Media. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  10. ^ a b Ratliff, Ben (January 27, 2013). "Textures From Near, Far and Out of a Psychedelic Haze". The New York Times. p. AR23. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Macpherson, Alex (January 17, 2013). "Dawn Richard: Goldenheart – review". The Guardian. London. section G2, p. 20. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Tuffrey, Laurie (February 12, 2013). "Dawn Richard". The Quietus. Archived from the original on February 13, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g Hyden, Steven (January 30, 2013). "Is Dawn Richard's Goldenheart Already the Album of the Year?". Grantland.com. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  14. ^ a b c d e Bogart, Jonathan (January 28, 2013). "Behold: Dungeons & Dragons R&B". The Atlantic. Boston. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  15. ^ Ritchie, Kevin (January 17, 2013). "Dawn Richard - Goldenheart". Now. 32 (20). Toronto. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  16. ^ a b Patrick, Ryan B. (January 30, 2013). "Dawn Richard - Goldenheart". Exclaim!. Toronto. Archived from the original on January 31, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  17. ^ Green, Treye (January 28, 2013). "Dawn Richard On 'GoldenHeart' Album, Going Independent And R&B's Evolving Sound". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on February 3, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  18. ^ "New Music: Dawn Richard – '86'". Rap-Up. Calabasas. September 25, 2012. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  19. ^ "'86: Dawn Richard: MP3 Downloads". Amazon.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  20. ^ Nero, Mark Edward (January 20, 2013). "R&B News N Rumors: 01/20/13 Edition". About.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  21. ^ a b c d Hampp, Andrew. "Dawn Richard's 'NLX': Exclusive Song Premiere". Billboard. New York. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  22. ^ Pryor, Jocelynn (February 22, 2013). "Independent Artists from Super D Independent Distribution (SDID) Heat Up the Billboard Charts" (Press release). Irvine: PRWeb. Archived from the original on February 24, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  23. ^ Powers, Ann (January 30, 2013). "All The Singular Ladies: 6 Women At The Cutting Edge Of R&B". NPR. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  24. ^ Brown, Lea (January 14, 2013). "New Releases: Teena Marie 'Beautiful' and Dawn Richard 'Goldenheart'". Singersroom. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  25. ^ "Independent Albums Breakers Top 20 - 26th January 2013". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  26. ^ a b "Artist Index" (PDF). Billboard. February 2, 2013. p. 2. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  27. ^ "Goldenheart : Dawn Richard: MP3 Downloads". Amazon.co.uk. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  28. ^ "Goldenheart : Dawn Richard: MP3 Downloads". Amazon.com. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  29. ^ "Dawn Richard - Goldenheart CD Album". CD Universe. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  30. ^ "Goldenheart". Amazon.co.uk. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.

External links

Armor On

Armor On is the first EP and second major release by American recording artist Dawn Richard as a solo act. Dawn Richard is best known for being a part of Diddy – Dirty Money and Danity Kane. The album and track listing for Armor On was revealed on March 7, 2012. The album serves as a prelude to her upcoming album Goldenheart Trilogy, the first of which was released in January 2013. Armor On was released exclusively on iTunes.

Richard released several promotional songs before the release of the album. "S.M.F.U (Save Me from You)" was the first. A black-and-white video for "S.M.F.U" was released online. "Change" was released as the second promotional single from Armor On, while "Black Lipstick" was chosen as the third promotional single.

The lead single "Bombs" debuted March 27 and Richard appeared on 106 & Park to premiere the video. On June 25, the video for the second single "Automatic" premiered on 106 & Park.

Blackheart (album)

Blackheart is the third studio album by American singer Dawn Richard, which was released on January 15, 2015, by Our Dawn Entertainment. The album was originally scheduled for an October 2013 release, but pushed back in favor for the production of the third Danity Kane album DK3. None of the previously released singles "Judith", "Meteors", "Levitate" and "Valkyrie" can be found on the final track listing.

Dawn Richard

Dawn Angeliqué Richard, known professionally as Dawn Richard or D∆WN (born August 5, 1983), is an American singer-songwriter, actress and animator. Richard started her career after auditioning for Making the Band 3 in 2004. During this time Richard became a member of American girl band Danity Kane, from 2005 to 2009, and reformed the group with 3 of the original 5 members in late 2013. In 2009 Richard joined Diddy-Dirty Money with label head Sean "Diddy" Combs and Kalenna Harper, disbanding in 2011.In 2011, following her departure from Bad Boy Records, Richard launched her solo career. Her debut album Goldenheart was released on January 15, 2013, by Our Dawn Entertainment; it received universal acclaim from music critics. In 2015 Richard's sophomore album Blackheart peaked at number two on Billboard's

Dance/Electronic charts. On November 18, 2016 Richard released the final installation to her album trilogy, REDEMPTION.

Redemption (Dawn Richard album)

Redemption, the physical edition is labeled Redemptionheart, is the fourth studio album by American singer Dawn Richard, which was released on November 18, 2016, by Local Action / Our Dawn Entertainment.

Redemption serves as the final chapter in a trilogy that includes 2013's Goldenheart and 2015's Blackheart. The album features contributions from Noisecastle III as well as New Orleans natives Trombone Shorty and PJ Morton.

The Prelude to A Tell Tale Heart

The Prelude to A Tell Tale Heart is the first, full-length studio mixtape released by Dawn Richard.

Before the full studio album release Richard has released a few songs, one of them being "Me Myself & Y" which was released as a promotional single on globalgrind.com. Others are "These Tears", a heavy ballad with amazing vocals from Richard, and "Let Love In", another rock ballad with heavy vocal harmonies. She has also remixed a few of her earlier leaked songs, like "Trip City" and "Superhero", with "Trip City" being remixed into "Intro (The Fall)" and "Superhero" being put on the mixtape as an a cappella.

The album was released Monday, February 7, 2011 on her official website. There are 15 tracks. The album was titled "the prelude to..." because there was to be an official debut studio album by Dawn Richard entitled A Tell Tale Heart, which she had been working on for three years; however, it was later titled Goldenheart and released in 2013.

To promote the release of her mixtape, Richard organized several club events. On April 21, 2011 an event titled "Nightclub Mixtape Party Release" was held at PHX, and earlier on February 7, 2011 at the Milan club in Baltimore.

Whiteout (EP)

Whiteout is the second EP by American Recording Artist Dawn Richard. It was released on December 1, 2012.

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