Golden Richards

John Golden Richards (born December 31, 1950) is a former professional American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Chicago Bears. He played college football at Brigham Young University and the University of Hawaii.

Golden Richards
No. 83
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:December 31, 1950 (age 68)
Salt Lake City, Utah
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:181 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school:Salt Lake City (UT) Granite
College:Brigham Young
Hawaii
NFL Draft:1973 / Round: 2 / Pick: 46
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:86
Receptions:122
Receiving yards:2,136
Receiving touchdowns:17
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Richards attended Granite High School where he lettered in 5 sports (football, basketball, track, tennis, baseball) and received All-state honors in 3 (football, basketball, track). In football he joined his brother Doug Richards and played fullback. He led the track & field team to the Utah Class A state title.[1] In basketball, he played guard and was named second-team All-state.[2]

After being recruited by different division I colleges, he had decided to attend the University of Utah, but his church bishop influenced Richards to attend BYU instead of serving on a mission.

From the start he was the fastest player on the BYU team and wore number 22 in honor of Bob Hayes. As a sophomore, he led the team in receiving with 36 receptions for 513 yards (fifth among WAC receivers) and 1 touchdown.[3] As a junior, he again led the team in receiving with 14 receptions for 287 yards and 1 touchdown. He also had 33 punt returns for 624 yards (17.9 average) and 4 touchdowns, 23 kickoff returns for 468 yards (19.8 average). He was first in the nation in punt returns and 16th in all-purpose yards. He set four NCAA records with most punt return yards (219 against North Texas St.) in a game, most kickoff returns (247 yards, 7 returns) in a game, average per kickoff return (35.3 yards) in a season and tied the record for most touchdowns (4) on punt returns in a season. He received All-WAC honors.

The combination of being ruled academically ineligible and BYU's run-oriented offense, made him take the decision to transfer to the University of Hawaii for his senior season.[4] As a senior, he had 23 receptions for 414 yards and 5 touchdowns, before injuring his knee.

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys

Richards was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the second round (46th overall) of the 1973 NFL Draft. As a rookie, he was fastest player on the team and played mostly on special teams. In the NFC Championship against the Minnesota Vikings, he returned a punt 63 yards for a touchdown.

In 1974, he was named the starter at wide receiver over Bob Hayes. He was the team's long threat (with receptions of 52, 58, 46 and 43 yards) and had his best statistical year with 26 receptions for 467 yards (18 average) and 5 touchdowns. In his third year, he had 21 receptions for 451 yards (21.5 average) and 4 touchdowns. In 1976, he had 19 receptions for 414 yards (21.8 average) and 3 touchdowns, missing 3 games because of a hamstring injury.

The next season, his fourth straight as a starter, he alternated with Butch Johnson, recording 17 receptions for 225 yards (13.2 average) and 3 touchdowns. At the end of the year in Super Bowl XII against the Denver Broncos, he had his most notable career highlight, catching a 29-yard pass from fullback Robert Newhouse for the game clinching touchdown.

In 1978 with the emergence of Tony Hill, he lost his starting position and was traded to the Chicago Bears, in exchange for a 5th round draft choice (#121-Bob Hukill) in 1979 and a 3rd round draft choice (#78-Bill Roe) in 1980.[5]

Chicago Bears

In 1978, Richards had a career-high 27 receptions with the Chicago Bears. The next season, he played in only 5 games, before suffering a knee injury while blocking on Walter Payton's 65 yard touchdown reception against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, although he completed the game. His contract wasn't renewed after he was placed on the injured reserve list.[6]

Denver Broncos

On May 8, 1980, he signed as a free agent with the Denver Broncos.[7] He retired after suffering a second straight season-ending injury and being placed on the injured reserve list.[8]

Personal life

Richards was the host and co-producer of a hunting and fishing show for ESPN Network called "ESPN Outdoors". He was mentioned on "A Beer Can Named Desire" and "Cops and Robert" episodes of the cartoon sitcom King of the Hill.

Richards' post NFL life included drug addiction, alcoholism, three divorces, and arrests for forgery.[1]

In 2011, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, with doctors believing it being a combination of the hits from football and his drug usage being causes. He lives with his two sons, Goldie and Jordan. [9]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Skyline, Delta Snow Champions". Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  2. ^ "1969 Class 'A' All-State". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  3. ^ "Cougars Spark New Offense". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  4. ^ "Y's Golden Richards 'Ineligible'". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  5. ^ "Richards hurt by news of trade". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  6. ^ "Golden Richards won't be signed". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  7. ^ "Transactions". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  8. ^ "Transaction". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  9. ^ https://universe.byu.edu/2013/02/05/golden-richards/

External links

1971 BYU Cougars football team

The 1971 BYU Cougars football team was an American football team that represented Brigham Young University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1971 college football season. In their eighth and final season under head coach Tommy Hudspeth, the Cougars compiled a 5–6 record (3–4 against WAC opponents), finished fourth in the WAC, and outscored opponents by a total of 227 to 199.Pete Van Valkenburg led the team with 602 rushing yards, 684 yards of total offense, and 48 points scored. Other statistical leaders included Bill August with 448 passing yards, Golden Richards with 238 receiving yards, and Dave Atkinson with nine interceptions.

1976 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1976 Dallas Cowboys season was their 17th in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 10–4, winning eleven games. They qualified for the playoffs, but were stunned by the Los Angeles Rams in the Divisional round.

1977 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1977 Dallas Cowboys season was their 18th in the NFL. The club appeared twice on Monday Night Football. Tony Dorsett rushed for 1,007 yards and became the second member of the Cowboys (first since 1973) to have a 1,000-yard rushing season. During the season, the club scored 345 points, which ranked first in the NFC, while the defense only gave up 212 points. The Cowboys made it to their fourth Super Bowl and beat the Denver Broncos to capture their second Super Bowl Championship. They were the first team from the NFC East Division to win two Super Bowls. Their 15-2 record (.882, including the postseason) remains the highest single season winning percentage in team history.

1978 Chicago Bears season

The 1978 Chicago Bears season was their 59th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 7–9 record in the first year of Coach Neill Armstrong, yet another below .500 record in the 1970s.

1979 Chicago Bears season

The 1979 Chicago Bears season was their 60th regular season and 14th postseason completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–6 record under second year coach Neill Armstrong but lost to the Philadelphia Eagles in the opening round of the playoffs.

Andy Frederick

Andrew Brian Frederick (born July 25, 1954) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Chicago Bears. He played college football at the University of New Mexico.

Bill Gregory

William Penn Gregory, Jr. (born December 14, 1949) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Seattle Seahawks. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin.

Billy Joe DuPree

Billy Joe DuPree (born March 7, 1950) is a former professional American football tight end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Michigan State University.

Butch Johnson (American football)

Michael "Butch" McColly Johnson (born May 28, 1954) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos. He played college football at the University of California, Riverside and was drafted in the third round (87th overall) of the 1976 NFL Draft.

Drew Pearson (American football)

Drew Pearson (born January 12, 1951) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Tulsa.

Ernie Stautner

Ernest Alfred Stautner (April 20, 1925 – February 16, 2006) was a German-born American football coach and defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Boston College.

Jethro Pugh

Jethro Pugh Jr. (July 3, 1944 – January 7, 2015) was an American football defensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys for fourteen seasons. He played college football at Elizabeth City State College.

John Fitzgerald (center)

John Robert Fitzgerald (born April 16, 1948) is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys from 1971 to 1980, including four Super Bowls. He played college football at Boston College and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1970 NFL Draft.

Ralph Neely

Ralph Eugene Neely (born September 12, 1943) is a former American football offensive tackle who played 13 seasons and 172 games for the Dallas Cowboys from 1965 to 1977.

Rayfield Wright

Larry Rayfield Wright (born August 23, 1945) is a former American football player, an offensive tackle for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League for thirteen seasons and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 2006.Nicknamed the "Big Cat" for his nimble feet, Wright played on five NFC Championship teams that advanced to the Super Bowl (1970, 1971, 1975, 1977, and 1978 seasons), winning twice. He also participated in the Ice Bowl against the Green Bay Packers for the NFL championship in his rookie season in 1967.

Robert Newhouse

Robert Fulton Newhouse (January 9, 1950 – July 22, 2014) was a football fullback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys for twelve seasons. He played college football at the University of Houston.

Roger Staubach

Roger Thomas Staubach (born February 5, 1942), nicknamed "Roger the Dodger", "Captain America" and "Captain Comeback", is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL).

He attended the U.S. Naval Academy where he won the 1963 Heisman Trophy, and after graduation he served in the U.S. Navy, including a tour of duty in Vietnam. Staubach joined the Dallas Cowboys in 1969 and played with the club during all 11 seasons of his career. He led the team to the Super Bowl five times, four as the starting quarterback. He led the Cowboys to victories in Super Bowl VI and Super Bowl XII. Staubach was named Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl VI, becoming the first of four players to win both the Heisman Trophy and Super Bowl MVP, along with Jim Plunkett, Marcus Allen and Desmond Howard. He was named to the Pro Bowl six times during his 11-year NFL career. He is currently executive chairman of Jones Lang LaSalle.

Super Bowl XII

Super Bowl XII was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1977 season. The Cowboys defeated the Broncos 27–10 to win their second Super Bowl. The game was played on January 15, 1978, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. This was the first time that the Super Bowl was played in a domed stadium, and the first time that the game was played in prime time in the Eastern United States.

The game pitted Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach against their former quarterback, Craig Morton. Led by Staubach and the Doomsday Defense, Dallas advanced to its fourth Super Bowl after posting a 12–2 regular season record and playoff victories over the Chicago Bears and the Minnesota Vikings. The Broncos, led by Morton and the Orange Crush Defense, made their first Super Bowl appearance after also posting a 12–2 regular-season record and postseason wins over the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Oakland Raiders.

The Cowboys defense dominated most of Super Bowl XII, forcing eight turnovers and allowing only eight pass completions by the Broncos for just 61 yards. Two interceptions led to 10 first-quarter points. Denver's longest play of the game was just 21 yards, which occurred on their opening drive. Dallas expanded its lead to 20–3 in the third quarter after wide receiver Butch Johnson made a diving catch in the end zone for a 45-yard touchdown reception. An ineffective Morton was replaced by Norris Weese late in the third period. He promptly drove the Broncos downfield to score a touchdown to cut the lead to 20-10, capped by a Rob Lytle one-yard touchdown run. But the Cowboys put the game out of reach in the fourth when fullback Robert Newhouse threw a 29-yard touchdown pass on a halfback option play to receiver Golden Richards.For the first and only time, two players won Super Bowl MVP honors: defensive tackle Randy White and defensive end Harvey Martin. This was also the first time that a defensive lineman was named Super Bowl MVP.

Tony Hill (wide receiver)

Leroy Anthony Hill, Jr. (born June 23, 1956) is a former American football wide receiver of the National Football League, who played ten seasons for the Dallas Cowboys. He played collegiately at Stanford University.

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