Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award

The Cecil B. DeMille Award is an honorary Golden Globe Award bestowed by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) for "outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment".[1][2] The HFPA board of directors selects the honorees from a variety of actors, directors, writers and producers who have made a significant mark in the film industry.[1] It was first presented at the 9th Golden Globe Awards ceremony in February 1952 and is named in honor of its first recipient, director Cecil B. DeMille.[3] The HFPA chose DeMille due to his prestige in the industry and his "internationally recognized and respected name".[3] DeMille received the award the year his penultimate film, The Greatest Show on Earth, premiered.[3] A year later in 1953, the award was presented to producer Walt Disney.[4]

The award has been presented annually since 1952, with exceptions being 1976 and 2008, the latter due to the 2007–08 Writers Guild of America strike's cancellation of that year's ceremony.[5] The award that year was meant to honor director Steven Spielberg, but due to the cancellation of the ceremony, the award was presented to him the following year.[5] The youngest honoree was actress Judy Garland, at age 39 in 1962. Garland was also the first female honoree.[1] The oldest honoree was producer Samuel Goldwyn, at age 93 in 1973.[1][3] In 1982, Sidney Poitier became the first African-American recipient.[1] In 2018, Oprah Winfrey became the first African-American woman to receive the honor.[6] As of 2019, 66 honorees have received the Cecil B. DeMille Award, 15 women and 51 men.

Cecil B. DeMille Award
The Cecil B. DeMille Award statuette
The Cecil B. DeMille Award statuette
Awarded for"outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment"
CountryUnited States
Presented byHollywood Foreign Press Association
First awarded1952
Currently held byJeff Bridges (2019)
Websitegoldenglobes.org

List of honorees

Year Image Honorees Nationality Description[3] Ref.
1952 Demille - c1920 Cecil B. DeMille  USA "A Hollywood pioneer, he directed and produced films such as The Ten Commandments (1923), The King of Kings (1927), The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) and The Ten Commandments (1956)." [3]
1953 Walt Disney 1946 Walt Disney[a]  USA "In 1928, he created Steamboat Willie introducing Mickey Mouse, and from that point there was no stopping the king of family entertainment in the U.S." [4]
1954 Darryl F. Zanuck 1964 Darryl F. Zanuck  USA "Child actor at 8, World War I soldier at 15 (he lied about his age), bantamweight boxer, screenwriter, producer and co-founder of 20th Century Fox." [7]
1955 Jean Hersholt[b]  Denmark "A Dane who came to Hollywood in 1914 when he was 28 and became a leading character actor and well-known humanitarian." [8]
1956 Jack Warner portrait copy Jack L. Warner  Canada "Youngest of twelve children of Jewish immigrants from Poland who, with three brothers, established Warner Bros. which he ran with a firm hand until 1967." [9]
1957 Mervyn LeRoy - 1958 Mervyn LeRoy  USA "Child actor and newsboy who started in the wardrobe department in 1919 and became a top director/producer." [10]
1958 Buddy Adler  USA "Began as a writer and always looked for the strong story, as evidenced in the films during his time as the head of production for 20th Century Fox." [11]
1959 Maurice Chevalier-publicity Maurice Chevalier  France "The beloved Frenchman came to Hollywood in 1929 but was denied re-entry in 1935 due to his political views. By 1959, he was back, however." [12]
1960 Bing Crosby 1951 Bing Crosby  USA "Vocalist-drummer turned singer turned actor – the world loved that memorable voice and personality, and so did the HFPA." [13]
1961 Astaire, Fred - Never Get Rich Fred Astaire  USA "One of the immortals; began his career at age 7, danced with Ginger Rogers in ten films and then with Rita Hayworth, Eleanor Powell and Cyd Charisse." [14]
1962 Judygarland astarisborn warnerbros publicitystill 19542 Judy Garland  USA "Born in a trunk, working in films since 1935. When she received the award, A Star Is Born and her dramatic vignette in Judgment at Nuremberg were fresh in everyone's memory." [15]
1963 Bob Hope, 1978 Bob Hope  USA "From vaudeville to movies where seven Road pictures with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour as well as parodies and comedies made the world love him." [16]
1964
Joseph Levine and Cathy Ryan (1975)
Joseph E. Levine  USA "Born in direst poverty, a school drop-out at 14. As producer and founder of Embassy Pictures, he knew how to create excitement around his movies." [17]
1965 Annex - Stewart, James (Call Northside 777) 01 James Stewart  USA "An intriguing leading man who came to represent the finest of American character traits." [18]
1966 John Wayne - still portrait John Wayne  USA "He became the cinematic symbol of the strong man of few words who could solve every tricky situation and problem." [19]
1967 Charlton Heston - 1953 Charlton Heston  USA "Since his debut as Mark Antony in Julius Caesar in 1950, he remained the quintessential portrayer of heroes." [20]
1968 Kirk douglas photo signed Kirk Douglas  USA "An actor in films since 1946, a producer of films such as Spartacus, he was also the U.S. Goodwill Ambassador since 1963." [21]
1969 Gregory Peck 1948 Gregory Peck  USA "He combined his acting (To Kill a Mockingbird) with being active in charitable, civil rights and film industry causes." [22]
1970 Joan Crawford 1946 by Paul Hesse Joan Crawford  USA "From 1925 and throughout the '60s, she was the reigning queen of the Hollywood filmscape." [23]
1971 Frank Sinatra '57 Frank Sinatra  USA "A singing/acting legend, loved and revered by countless fans all over the world." [24]
1972 Alfred Hitchcock by Jack Mitchell Alfred Hitchcock  UK "Hailed as the unmatched master of the thriller genre, first during his so-called British period, then in American films." [25]
1973 Samuel Goldwyn - Jul 1919 EH Samuel Goldwyn  Poland "A true Hollywood pioneer also known for his Goldwynisms such as 'Anyone seeing a psychiatrist should have his head examined.'" [26]
1974 Bette Davis - portrait Bette Davis  USA "She began her screen career in 1931 and remained active for nearly 60 years, playing willful, liberated, spitefully independent females." [27]
1975 Hal B. Wallis  USA "From motion picture theater manager to assistant to head of publicity at Warner Bros. to becoming one of Hollywood's most successful producers." [28]
1976 Not awarded [29]
1977 Walter Mirisch  USA "A Harvard graduate who worked his way up the administrative ladder, formed the Mirisch Company, Inc., with two brothers." [30]
1978 Red Skelton 1960 rebalance Red Skelton  USA "The son of a circus clown who died before he was born, he was the star of many MGM comedies, combining these with superstardom on television." [31]
1979 Lucille Ball 1944crop Lucille Ball  USA "Hollywood's greatest female clown... and the world still proclaims I Love Lucy." [32]
1980 Henry Fonda as Mr. Roberts 1948 (cropped) Henry Fonda  USA "When the HFPA honored him, there were memorable roles to look back on, except one – his last... On Golden Pond hit the screens the following year." [33]
1981 Gene kelly Gene Kelly  USA "He danced, choreographed, sang and acted his way into our hearts from 1942 (For Me and My Gal) and on (Singin' in the Rain, On the Town, An American in Paris)." [34]
1982 Sidney Poitier-NPS (cropped) Sidney Poitier  Bahamas "His charismatic screen persona brought him into definite leading man status (To Sir, with Love, In the Heat of the Night, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner). By the time of this award, he had also directed films for ten years." [35]
1983 Lord Olivier 6 Allan Warren Laurence Olivier  UK "Lord Olivier acted from age 9 and was especially known for making Shakespearean plays and characters come alive." [36]
1984 Paul Newman - 1963 Paul Newman  USA "An enduring superstar (Hud, Cool Hand Luke, The Sting, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid) with intelligence and humor saturating his roles, who had also demonstrated a distinct flair for directing." [37]
1985 Taylor, Elizabeth posed Elizabeth Taylor  UK "Having made her Hollywood screen debut at age 10, she became part of the world's cinematic royalty, from National Velvet in 1944 to Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in 1966 – and beyond." [38]
1986 Barbara Stanwyck 1943 Barbara Stanwyck  USA "Cecil B. DeMille's favorite actress, equally at ease in comedy and drama—this was the year she left films to concentrate on television." [39]
1987 Anthony Quinn 1988 2 Anthony Quinn  Mexico "Born in Mexico, he entered films in 1936 after a brief stage experience. In addition to his acting (Zorba the Greek, Lawrence of Arabia, La Strada), he was an accomplished painter and sculptor." [40]
1988 Clint Eastwood at 2010 New York Film Festival Clint Eastwood  USA "The 'Man with No Name' who ended up by being known by just about everyone on Earth. Versatile as an actor and also as a top director." [41]
1989 DorisDay-midnightlace Doris Day  USA "A singer whose voice sold millions of copies and opened the door to a movie career in comedy, then also in drama as in The Man Who Knew Too Much." [42]
1990 Audrey Hepburn 1956 Audrey Hepburn  UK "She came to represent grace, radiance and soulfulness—her appearance brought to mind delicate china but with the endurance of stainless steel." [43]
1991 Jack Lemmon - 1968 Jack Lemmon  USA "This Harvard-educated, piano-playing actor with a remarkably broad range had by this time made some forty-four motion pictures." [44]
1992 Robert Mitchum 1949 (no signature) Robert Mitchum  USA "A rugged leading man for more than four decades, whom Deborah Kerr said was a hundred times greater as an actor than he himself believed." [45]
1993 Lauren Bacall 1945 (cropped) Lauren Bacall  USA "Being publicized as 'The Look' early on, she soon proved to be much more than that—having 'cinema personality to burn,' to quote James Agee." [46]
1994 Robert Redford (cropped) Robert Redford  USA "A movie hero with boyish looks whose strong ideas and ideals led into producing, directing, and the establishment of the Sundance Institute." [47]
1995 Sophia Loren - 1955 Sophia Loren  Italy "The slave girl in Quo Vadis in 1951 went on to impress in a succession of roles (who can forget Two Women?) in more than eighty films in Italy and Hollywood." [48]
1996 Sean Connery (1983) Sean Connery  UK "The handsome Scotsman began acting in films and on British TV in 1954. After being James Bond, he went on creating strong men in scores of films." [49]
1997 Dustin Hoffman Quartet avp 2013 Dustin Hoffman  USA "Erupting on the screen in The Graduate (1967), he has not stopped acting with body, soul and heart since." [50]
1998 Shirley MacLaine - 1976 Shirley MacLaine  USA "A Renaissance woman who acts (comedy and drama), dances, sings, and writes about her spiritual wanderings, always ready to go out on a limb." [51]
1999 Jack Nicholson 2002 Jack Nicholson  USA "A living legend who doesn't think of himself as such, an enduring superstar simply because he is a terrific actor." [52]
2000 Barbra Streisand - 1966 Barbra Streisand  USA "Singer, actress, film director, producer, writer, and composer whose popularity has endured and grown for nearly four decades." [53]
2001 Al Pacino Al Pacino  USA "One of the greatest actors in all of film history, Al Pacino established himself during one of film's greatest decades, the 70s, and has become an enduring and iconic figure in the world of American movies." [54]
2002 Harrison Ford Cannes Harrison Ford  USA "Ruggedly handsome, tightlipped leading man whose filmic output includes starring roles in four of the 10 highest-grossing films of all time: Star Wars (1977), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), and Return of the Jedi (1983)." [55]
2003 Gene Hackman - 1972 Gene Hackman  USA "His tremendous ability with 'ordinary guy' roles has been rightly praised, sometimes at the expense of his equally impressive comic timing and the undercurrent of eccentricity that sometimes floats to the surface of his straightest roles." [56]
2004 Michael Douglas Deauville 2013 Michael Douglas  USA "A Hollywood icon who has not allowed his star-studded pedigree to impede him from becoming one of the industry's greatest." [57]
2005 Robin Williams Happy Feet premiere Robin Williams  USA "Educated at Juilliard, his talent has carried him gracefully through roles hilarious, dramatic and bizarre." [58]
2006 Anthony Hopkins-Tuscan Sun Festival Anthony Hopkins  UK "His reserved character and personality belie his explosive energy on screen and his outstanding power of expression." [59]
2007 Warren Beatty - 1975 Warren Beatty  USA "One of the most fascinating characters in the history of Hollywood, Warren Beatty received five Golden Globes, including one as Best Actor (Comedy or Musical) for Heaven Can Wait and another as Best Director for Reds." [60]
2008 Not awarded[c] [61]
2009 Steven Spielberg by Gage Skidmore Steven Spielberg  USA "Director, producer, studio founder (DreamWorks), Spielberg has received Golden Globes for Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial." [62]
2010 Martin Scorsese by David Shankbone Martin Scorsese  USA "Scorsese received two Golden Globe Awards for Best Director of a Motion Picture for The Departed and Gangs of New York. He received five additional Golden Globe nominations, including four as Best Director (Casino, The Age of Innocence, Goodfellas and Raging Bull) and one for Best Screenplay for Goodfellas (with Nicholas Pileggi)." [63]
2011 Robert De Niro 2011 Shankbone Robert De Niro  USA "An actors' actor, from Mean Streets and The Godfather Part II to Silver Linings Playbook and Joy. Nominated for eight Golden Globes, winner as Best Actor/Drama for Raging Bull." [64]
2012 Academy Award-winning actor Morgan Freeman narrates for the opening ceremony (26904746425) (cropped) Morgan Freeman  USA "A stellar career spanning over forty years in film, stage and television. One of the most respected figures in the entertainment industry." [65]
2013 Jodie Foster Césars 2011 2 (cropped) Jodie Foster  USA "From child actor to movie star and beyond: director, producer, industry leader. Her acceptance speech at 70th Golden Globe Awards became one of the highlights of the evening." [66]
2014 Woody Allen Cannes 2015 Woody Allen[d]  USA "A king of comedy who moved at ease into drama and psychological observation throughout a massive career spanning seven decades. Eight times a Golden Globe nominee, winner twice, both times as a screenwriter, for The Purple Rose of Cairo and Midnight in Paris." [68]
2015 George Clooney 2016 George Clooney  USA "Actor, writer, director, producer and humanitarian. Ten Golden Globe nominations, three wins: O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Actor – Motion Picture Comedy or Musical), Syriana (Supporting Actor) and The Descendants (Actor – Motion Picture Drama)." [69]
2016 Denzel Washington cropped Denzel Washington  USA "Washington’s achievements as a performer and a filmmaker have earned him seven Golden Globe Award nominations in two categories, resulting in two wins." [70]
2017 Meryl Streep from "Florence Foster Jenkins" at Opening Ceremony of the Tokyo International Film Festival 2016 (33644504135) (cropped) Meryl Streep  USA "With eight Golden Globes and 29 nominations, Meryl Streep is an icon of the performing arts." [71]
2018 Oprah in 2014 Oprah Winfrey  USA "Acclaimed actress, producer, television star, entrepreneur, and philanthropist, Oprah Winfrey is a Golden Globe nominee for her work in The Color Purple." [72]
2019 Jeff Bridges by Gage Skidmore 3 Jeff Bridges  USA "Part of an illustrious Hollywood family, Jeff Bridges built a long, eclectic and celebrated career. A Golden Globe winner and four-time Golden Globe nominee, Bridges is also a musician and passionate philanthropist." [73]

Statistics

Winners by nationality
Country Winners
 Denmark 1
 Bahamas 1
 Canada 1
 France 1
 Italy 1
 Mexico 1
 Poland 1
 UK 6
 USA 53

Notes

  1. ^ Stanley Kramer and Adolph Zukor received nominations for the award.[4]
  2. ^ Stanley Kramer received a nomination for the award.[8]
  3. ^ The 2008 awards ceremony was cancelled due to the 2007–08 Writers Guild of America strike; the HFPA deferred the award to the 2009 ceremony.[5]
  4. ^ Woody Allen's award was accepted by Diane Keaton.[67]

References

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  2. ^ "About the HFPA – Golden Globes". The Golden Globes. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Archived from the original on January 26, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
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  4. ^ a b c "Winners & Nominees 1953 – Golden Globes". The Golden Globes. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c "Spielberg Globe honour 'deferred'". BBC News. January 9, 2008. Archived from the original on May 25, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  6. ^ Corinthios, Aurelie (January 7, 2018). "Oprah Winfrey Assures 'Time Is Up' for Sexual Predators in Powerful Golden Globes Speech". People. Archived from the original on January 26, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  7. ^ "Winners & Nominees 1954 – Golden Globes". The Golden Globes. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Winners & Nominees 1955 – Golden Globes". The Golden Globes. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
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External links

Al Pacino

Alfredo James Pacino (, Italian: [paˈtʃiːno]; born April 25, 1940) is an American actor and filmmaker. Pacino has had a career spanning more than five decades, during which time he has received numerous accolades and honors both competitive and honorary, among them an Academy Award, two Tony Awards, two Primetime Emmy Awards, a British Academy Film Award, four Golden Globe Awards, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, and the National Medal of Arts. He is one of few performers to have won a competitive Oscar, an Emmy, and a Tony Award for acting, dubbed the "Triple Crown of Acting".

A method actor and former student of the HB Studio and the Actors Studio in New York City, where he was taught by Charlie Laughton and Lee Strasberg, Pacino made his feature film debut with a minor role in Me, Natalie (1969) and gained favorable notice for his lead role as a heroin addict in The Panic in Needle Park (1971). He achieved international acclaim and recognition for his breakthrough role as Michael Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather (1972) receiving his first Oscar nomination and would reprise the role in the equally successful sequels The Godfather Part II (1974) and The Godfather Part III (1990). Pacino's performance as Michael Corleone in these films is regarded as one of the greatest screen performances in film history.

Pacino received his first Best Actor Oscar nomination for Serpico (1973); he was also nominated for The Godfather Part II, Dog Day Afternoon (1975) and ...And Justice for All (1979), and won the award in 1993 for his performance as blind Lieutenant Colonel Slade in Scent of a Woman (1992). For his performances in The Godfather, Dick Tracy (1990), and Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), Pacino was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Other notable roles include Tony Montana in Scarface (1983), Carlito Brigante in Carlito's Way (1993), Lieutenant Vincent Hanna in Heat (1995), Benjamin Ruggiero in Donnie Brasco (1997), Lowell Bergman in The Insider (1999), and Detective Will Dormer in Insomnia (2002). In television, Pacino has acted in several productions for HBO, including the miniseries Angels in America (2003) and the Jack Kevorkian biopic You Don't Know Jack (2010); he won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie for each role.

In addition to his work in film, Pacino has had an extensive career on stage. He is a two-time Tony Award winner, in 1969 and 1977, for his performances in Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie? and The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel, respectively. A lifelong fan of Shakespeare, Pacino directed and starred in Looking for Richard (1996), a documentary film about the play Richard III, a role which Pacino had earlier portrayed on stage in 1977. He has also acted as Shylock in a 2004 feature film adaptation and a 2010 stage production of The Merchant of Venice.

Having made his filmmaking debut with Looking for Richard, Pacino has also directed and starred in the independent film Chinese Coffee (2000), and the films Wilde Salomé (2011) and Salomé (2013), about the play Salomé by Oscar Wilde. Since 1994, Pacino has been the joint president of the Actors Studio with Ellen Burstyn and Harvey Keitel. In 2016, he received the Kennedy Center Honor.

Alfred Hitchcock filmography

Alfred Hitchcock (1899–1980) was an English filmmaker and director. Popularly known as the "Master of Suspense" for his use of innovative film techniques in thrillers, Hitchcock started his career in the British film industry as a title designer and art director for a number of silent films during the early 1920s, most of which are now lost. His directorial debut was the 1925 release The Pleasure Garden. Hitchcock followed this with The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, his first commercial and critical success. It featured many of the thematic elements his films would be known for such as an innocent man on the run. It also featured the first of his famous cameo appearances. Two years later he directed Blackmail (1929) which was his first sound film. In 1935 Hitchcock directed The 39 Steps. Three years later he directed The Lady Vanishes, starring Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave.

Hitchcock's British films – and many of his early American ones – are often mistakenly believed to be in the public domain. In fact, all of his films are under copyright in the US and UK. Nonetheless, bootlegs of his work continue to be widely disseminated.In 1940, Hitchcock transitioned to Hollywood productions, the first of which was the psychological thriller Rebecca starring Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine. He received his first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Director, and the film won Best Picture. Hitchcock worked with Fontaine again the following year on the film Suspicion which also starred Cary Grant. In 1943, Hitchcock directed another psychological thriller Shadow of a Doubt which starred Teresa Wright and Joseph Cotten. Three years later he reunited with Grant on Notorious which also starred Ingrid Bergman. The film included a three-minute intermittent kissing scene between the leads shot specifically to skirt the Motion Picture Production Code which at the time limited such scenes to three seconds. In 1948, Hitchcock directed Rope which starred James Stewart. The film was his first in Technicolor and is remembered for its use of long takes to make the film appear to be a single continuous shot. Three years later he directed Strangers on a Train (1951).

Hitchcock collaborated with Grace Kelly on three films: Dial M for Murder (1954), Rear Window (1954) and To Catch a Thief (1955). For Rear Window, Hitchcock received a nomination for Best Director at the Academy Awards. 1955 marked his debut on television as the host of the anthology television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents which he also produced. In 1958, Hitchcock directed the psychological thriller Vertigo starring Stewart and Kim Novak. The film topped the 2012 poll of the British film magazine Sight & Sound of the 50 Greatest Films of All Time and also topped the American Film Institute's Top Ten in the mystery genre. He followed this with the spy thriller North by Northwest (1959) which starred Grant and Eva Marie Saint. In 1960, he directed Psycho, the biggest commercial success of his career and for which he received his fifth nomination for Best Director at the Academy Awards. Three years later he directed horror film The Birds starring Tippi Hedren. The following year he reunited with Hedren on the film Marnie which also starred Sean Connery.

In recognition of his career, Hitchcock garnered the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Fellowship Award, the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, the Directors Guild of America's Lifetime Achievement Award and the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award. He received two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame to acknowledge his film and television achievements. In 1980, Hitchcock received a knighthood.

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress, model, dancer and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood's Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legend in Golden Age Hollywood, and was inducted into the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame.

Born in Ixelles, Brussels, Hepburn spent her childhood between Belgium, England, and the Netherlands. In Amsterdam, she studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell, before moving to London in 1948, continuing her ballet training with Marie Rambert, and then performing as a chorus girl in West End musical theatre productions. Following minor appearances in several films, Hepburn starred in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi, after being spotted by French novelist Colette, on whose work the play was based.

She shot to stardom after playing the lead role in Roman Holiday (1953), for which she was the first actress to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, and a BAFTA Award for a single performance. That same year, Hepburn won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Play for her performance in Ondine. She went on to star in a number of successful films, such as Sabrina (1954), The Nun's Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), Charade (1963), My Fair Lady (1964), and Wait Until Dark (1967), for which she received an Academy Award, Golden Globe, and BAFTA nominations. Hepburn won three BAFTA Awards for Best British Actress in a Leading Role. In recognition of her film career, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from BAFTA, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award, and the Special Tony Award. She remains one of only 15 people who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Awards.

Hepburn appeared in fewer films as her life went on, devoting much of her later life to UNICEF. She had contributed to the organisation since 1954, then worked in some of the poorest communities of Africa, South America and Asia between 1988 and 1992. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in December 1992. A month later, Hepburn died of appendiceal cancer at her home in Switzerland at the age of 63.

Audrey Hepburn on screen and stage

Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress who had an extensive career in film, television, and on the stage from 1948 to 1993. Considered by some to be one of the most beautiful women of all time, she was ranked as the third greatest screen legend in American cinema by the American Film Institute. Hepburn is also remembered as both a film and style icon. Her debut was as a flight stewardess in the 1948 Dutch film Dutch in Seven Lessons. Hepburn then performed on the British stage as a chorus girl in the musicals High Button Shoes (1948), and Sauce Tartare (1949). Two years later she made her Broadway debut as the title character in the play Gigi. Hepburn's Hollywood debut as a runaway princess in William Wyler's Roman Holiday (1953) opposite Gregory Peck made her a star. For her performance she received the Academy Award for Best Actress, the BAFTA Award for Best British Actress, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama. In 1954 she played a chauffeur's daughter caught in a love triangle in Billy Wilder's romantic comedy Sabrina opposite Humphrey Bogart and William Holden. In the same year Hepburn garnered the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for portraying the titular water nymph in the play Ondine.Her next role was as Natasha Rostova in the 1956 film adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace. In 1957 Hepburn starred with Gary Cooper and Maurice Chevalier in Billy Wilder's Love in the Afternoon, and with Fred Astaire in the musical film Funny Face. Two years later she appeared in the romantic adventure film Green Mansions, and played a nun in The Nun's Story. In 1961, Hepburn played café society girl Holly Golightly in the romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany's, and as a teacher accused of lesbianism in Wyler's drama The Children's Hour opposite Shirley MacLaine. Two years later she appeared opposite Cary Grant in the romantic mystery film Charade. Hepburn followed this by starring in the romantic comedy Paris When It Sizzles opposite William Holden, and as Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle in the musical film My Fair Lady (both in 1964). In 1967, she played a blind woman menaced by drug dealers in her own home in the suspense thriller Wait Until Dark which earned her a Best Actress Oscar nomination. Nine years later, Hepburn played Maid Marian opposite Sean Connery as Robin Hood in Robin and Marian.

Her final film appearance was a cameo as an angel in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989). Hepburn's final screen role was as the host of the television documentary series Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn (1993) for which she posthumously received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement – Informational Programming. In recognition of her career, Hepburn earned the Special Award from BAFTA, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award, and the Special Tony Award.

Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck (born Ruby Catherine Stevens; July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was an American actress, model, and dancer. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang, and Frank Capra. After a short, but notable, career as a stage actress in the late 1920s, she made 85 films in 38 years in Hollywood, before turning to television.

Orphaned at the age of four, and partially raised in foster homes, by 1944, Stanwyck had become the highest-paid woman in the United States. She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress four times - for Stella Dallas (1937), Ball of Fire (1941), Double Indemnity (1944), and Sorry, Wrong Number (1948). For her television work, she won three Emmy Awards - for The Barbara Stanwyck Show (1961), The Big Valley (1966), and The Thorn Birds (1983). Her performance in The Thorn Birds also won her a Golden Globe.

She received an Honorary Oscar at the 1982 Academy Award ceremony, and the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1986. She was also the recipient of honorary lifetime awards from the American Film Institute (1987), the Film Society of Lincoln Center (1986), the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (1981), and the Screen Actors Guild (1967). Stanwyck received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, and was ranked as the 11th greatest female star of classic American cinema by the American Film Institute. One of her directors, Jacques Tourneur, said of Stanwyck, "She only lives for two things, and both of them are work."

Buddy Adler

E. Maurice "Buddy" Adler (June 22, 1906 – July 12, 1960) was an American film producer and a former production head for 20th Century Fox studios.

Cecil B. DeMille

Cecil Blount DeMille (; August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was an American filmmaker. Between 1914 and 1958, he made a total of 70 features, both silent and sound films. He is acknowledged as a founding father of the cinema of the United States and the most commercially successful producer-director in film history. His films were distinguished by their epic scale and by his cinematic showmanship. He made silent films of every genre: social dramas, comedies, Westerns, farces, morality plays, and historical pageants.

DeMille began his career as a stage actor in 1900. He later moved to writing and directing stage productions, some with Jesse Lasky, who was then a vaudeville producer. DeMille's first film, The Squaw Man (1914), was also the first feature film shot in Hollywood. Its interracial love story made it a phenomenal hit and it "put Hollywood on the map". The continued success of his productions led to the founding of Paramount Pictures with Lasky and Adolph Zukor. His first biblical epic, The Ten Commandments (1923), was both a critical and financial success; it held the Paramount revenue record for twenty-five years.In 1927, he directed The King of Kings, a biography of Jesus of Nazareth, which was acclaimed for its sensitivity and reached more than 800 million viewers. The Sign of the Cross (1932) was the first sound film to integrate all aspects of cinematic technique. Cleopatra (1934) was his first film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. After more than thirty years in film production, DeMille reached the pinnacle of his career with Samson and Delilah (1949), a biblical epic which did "an all-time record business". Along with biblical and historical narratives, he also directed films oriented toward "neo-naturalism", which tried to portray the laws of man fighting the forces of nature.He went on to receive his first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Director for his circus drama The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), which won both the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama. His last and most famous film, The Ten Commandments (1956), also a Best Picture Academy Award nominee, is currently the seventh-highest-grossing film of all time, adjusted for inflation. In addition to his Best Picture Award, he received an Academy Honorary Award for his film contributions, the Palme d'Or (posthumously) for Union Pacific, a DGA Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. He was also the first recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, which was later named in his honor.

Frank Sinatra filmography

Frank Sinatra (1915–1998) was an American singer, actor, and producer who was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century. Over the course of his acting career he created a body of work that one biographer described as being "as varied, impressive and rewarding as that of any other Hollywood star".Sinatra began his career as a singer, initially in his native Hoboken, New Jersey, but increasing success led to a contract to perform on stage and radio across the United States. One of his earliest film roles was in the 1935 short film Major Bowes' Amateur Theatre of the Air, a spin off from the Major Bowes Amateur Hour radio show. He appeared in a full-length film in an uncredited cameo singing performance in Las Vegas Nights, singing "I'll Never Smile Again" with Tommy Dorsey's The Pied Pipers. His work with Dorsey's band also led to appearances in the full-length films Las Vegas Nights (1941) and Ship Ahoy (1942). As Sinatra's singing career grew, he appeared in larger roles in feature films, several of which were musicals, including three alongside Gene Kelly: Anchors Aweigh (1945), On the Town (1949) and Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949). As his acting career developed further, Sinatra also produced several of the film's in which he appeared, and directed one—None but the Brave—which he also produced and in which he starred.Sinatra's film and singing careers had declined by 1952, when he was out-of-contract with both his record company and film studio. In 1953 he re-kindled his film career by targeting serious roles: he auditioned for—and won—a role in From Here to Eternity for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture. Other serious roles followed, including a portrayal of an ex-convict and drug addict in The Man with the Golden Arm, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor and the British Academy Film Award for the Best Actor in a Leading Role.Sinatra received numerous awards for his film work. He won the Golden Globe for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for Pal Joey (1957), and was nominated in the same category for Come Blow Your Horn (1963). Three of the films in which Sinatra appears, The House I Live In (1945), The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and From Here to Eternity (1953)—have been added to the Library of Congress's National Film Registry. The House I Live In—a film that opposes anti-Semitism and racism—was awarded a special Golden Globe and Academy Award. In 1970, at the 43rd Academy Awards, Sinatra was presented with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award; the following year he was awarded the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.

List of awards and honors received by Judy Garland

Judy Garland received numerous awards and honors during her 40-year career. Garland won or was nominated for awards for her work in motion pictures, television, music recording, and on stage. She was twice nominated for an Academy Award, and was awarded a special Academy Juvenile Award in 1940. Garland won a Golden Globe Award, and was nominated for a second and a third one for The Judy Garland Show in 1964, and she received a special Tony Award for her record-breaking concert run at New York's Palace Theatre. Garland won two Grammy Awards for her concert album Judy at Carnegie Hall.

Garland has also received a number of posthumous awards and honors. She was the recipient of a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. She has twice been honored on United States postage stamps, and has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The American Film Institute has repeatedly recognized her talent, placing Garland eighth on its list of the top 100 female stars of all time and placing five of her recordings in its list of the 100 best songs from films, including "Over the Rainbow" at number one.

List of awards and nominations received by Al Pacino

This list includes the awards and nominations received by film and stage actor Al Pacino. Among his numerous competitive awards, he has won an Academy Award, a BAFTA Award, two Primetime Emmy Awards, two Tony Awards, and four Golden Globe Awards. He was also nominated for a Grammy Award. His honorary awards include the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 2001, the National Medal of Arts in 2011, and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2016.

List of awards and nominations received by Woody Allen

Throughout his career, American filmmaker, writer, and actor Woody Allen has received a considerable number of awards and distinctions in film festivals and yearly national film awards ceremonies, saluting his work as a director, screenwriter, and actor. Among his many competitive awards, he has won four Academy Awards, ten BAFTA awards, and two Golden Globe Awards.

Allen has won three Oscars for Best Original Screenplay for Annie Hall (1977), Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), and Midnight in Paris (2011), and one for Best Director for Annie Hall. He has been nominated 24 times: 16 as a screenwriter, seven as a director, and once as an actor. Allen has more screenwriting Academy Award nominations than any other writer; all in the Best Original Screenplay category. He also holds the record as the oldest winner (at age 76) of the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay (Midnight in Paris, 2011). As a writer, Allen won the 1978 O. Henry Award for his short story The Kugelmass Episode, published in The New Yorker on May 2, 1977.

Despite friendly recognition from the Academy, Allen has consistently refused to attend the ceremony or acknowledge his Oscar wins. His publicly given reason is his standing engagement to play clarinet in a Monday night ensemble. Back in 1974, Woody was quoted by ABC News as saying, "The whole concept of awards is silly. I cannot abide by the judgment of other people, because if you accept it when they say you deserve an award, then you have to accept it when they say you don't". He broke this pattern once. At the Academy Awards ceremony in 2002, Allen made an unannounced appearance, pleading for producers to continue filming their movies in New York City after the September 11 attacks, where he stated, "I didn't have to present anything. I didn't have to accept anything. I just had to talk about New York City." He was given a standing ovation before introducing a montage of movie clips featuring New York.His work has been widely celebrated in Europe. Allen twice won the César Award for Best Foreign Film, the first in 1980, for Manhattan and the second in 1986, for The Purple Rose of Cairo. Seven other of his movies were nominated for the prize: Annie Hall, Hannah and Her Sisters, Alice, Husbands and Wives, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Everyone Says I Love You, and Match Point. In 2002, Allen won the Prince of Asturias Award. Subsequently, the city of Oviedo, Spain, erected a life-size statue of Allen. In a 2005 UK poll The Comedian's Comedian, Allen was voted the third greatest comedy act ever by fellow comedians and comedy insiders. In June 2007, Allen received a PhD Honoris Causa from Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain.

His honorary awards include a Career Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1995, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Directors Guild of America in 1996, the BAFTA Fellowship in 1997, the Honorary Palme d'Or at the Cannes Festival in 2002, and the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 2014.

Michael Douglas on stage and screen

American actor and producer Michael Douglas began his film career with a brief uncredited role in Cast a Giant Shadow (1966). In the same year he played a small role in the play Bedford Forrest. His performance in Hail, Hero! (1969) earned him a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Male Newcomer. He won the 1971 Theatre World Award for Pinkville. During 1972–76, he played the lead role in the TV series The Streets of San Francisco. In 1975, Douglas produced One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest which won the Academy Award for Best Picture, Golden Globe for Best Picture and BAFTA Award for Best Film.Douglas' role of Gordon Gekko in Oliver Stone's Wall Street (1987) won him the Academy Award for Best Actor. For his portrayal of a fictional American president in the 1995 comedy The American President, he was nominated for Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. His performance in Wonder Boys (2000) earned him nominations for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role and Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama.He shared the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture with his co-actors in Traffic (2000). He reprised the role of Gekko in Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010) and was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture for the same. Douglas' portrayal of Liberace in Behind the Candelabra (2013) earned him the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie.For his contributions to the film industry, Douglas won the 2004 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award and the 2009 AFI Life Achievement Award.

Recy Taylor

Recy Taylor (née Corbitt; December 31, 1919 – December 28, 2017) was an African-American woman from Abbeville in Henry County, Alabama, U.S. She was born and raised in a sharecropping family in the Jim Crow era Southern United States. Taylor's refusal to remain silent about a brutal rape she suffered, perpetrated by white men, led to organizing in the African-American community on behalf of justice and civil rights.

On September 3, 1944, Taylor was kidnapped while leaving church and gang-raped by six white men. Despite the men's confessions to authorities, two grand juries subsequently declined to indict the men; no charges were ever brought against her assailants.In 2011, the Alabama Legislature officially apologized on behalf of the state "for its failure to prosecute her attackers." Taylor's rape, refusal to remain silent, and the subsequent court cases were among the early instances of nationwide protest and activism among the African-American community, and ended up providing an organizational spark in the civil rights movement.At the 2018 Golden Globe Awards, while accepting the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, Oprah Winfrey discussed and brought awareness to Taylor's story. The Congressional Black Caucus led Democratic Caucus members in wearing red "Recy" pins while attending the 2018 State of the Union, where Taylor's granddaughter, Mary Joyce Owens, was a guest.

Samuel Goldwyn

Samuel Goldwyn (born Szmuel Gelbfisz; Yiddish: שמואל געלבפֿיש‎; c. July, 1879 – January 31, 1974), also known as Samuel Goldfish, was a Polish-American film producer. He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood. His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958.

Shirley MacLaine

Shirley MacLaine (born Shirley MacLean Beaty, April 24, 1934) is an American film, television, and theater actress, singer, dancer, activist, and author. An Academy Award winner, MacLaine received the 40th AFI Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in 2012, and received the Kennedy Center Honors for her lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts in 2013. She is known for her New Age beliefs, and has an interest in spirituality and reincarnation. She has written a series of autobiographical works that describe these beliefs, document her world travels, and describe her Hollywood career.

Her first film was Alfred Hitchcock's The Trouble With Harry in 1955. A six-time Academy Award nominee, MacLaine received a nomination for Best Documentary Feature for The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir (1975), and Best Actress nominations for Some Came Running (1958), The Apartment (1960), Irma la Douce (1963), and The Turning Point (1977), before winning Best Actress for Terms of Endearment (1983). She twice won the BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress, for Ask Any Girl (1959), and The Apartment (1960); and won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Special for the 1976 TV special, Gypsy In My Soul. She has also won five competitive Golden Globe Awards, and received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 1998 ceremony.

Sophia Loren

Sofia Villani Scicolone, (Italian: [soˈfiːa vilˈlaːni ʃʃikoˈloːne]; born 20 September 1934), known by her stage name Sophia Loren (Italian: [ˈlɔːren], English: ), is an Italian film actress and singer. Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career in 1950 at age 16. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples.

Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women; Loren's performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first actress to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower; The Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting a family in the early 1970s, Loren chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men (1995) and Nine (2009).

Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was named by the American Film Institute as one of the 25 greatest female stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema, and she is currently the only living actress on the list.

Warren Beatty

Henry Warren Beatty (né Beaty; born March 30, 1937) is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been nominated for fourteen Academy Awards – four for Best Actor, four for Best Picture, two for Best Director, three for Original Screenplay, and one for Adapted Screenplay – winning Best Director for Reds (1981). Beatty is the only person to have been nominated for acting in, directing, writing, and producing the same film, and he did so twice: first for Heaven Can Wait (with Buck Henry as co-director), and again with Reds.Eight of the films he has produced have earned 53 Academy nominations, and in 1999, he was awarded the Academy's highest honor, the Irving G. Thalberg Award. Beatty has been nominated for eighteen Golden Globe Awards, winning six, including the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, which he was honored with in 2007. Among his Golden Globe-nominated films are Splendor in the Grass (1961), his screen debut, and Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), Dick Tracy (1990), Bugsy (1991), Bulworth (1998) and Rules Don't Apply (2016), all of which he also produced.

Director and collaborator Arthur Penn described Beatty as "the perfect producer", adding, "He makes everyone demand the best of themselves. Warren stays with a picture through editing, mixing and scoring. He plain works harder than anyone else I have ever seen."

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