Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film

The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries, or Television Film is an award presented annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a supporting role on a television series, miniseries or motion picture made for television for the calendar year. The award was first presented at the 28th Golden Globe Awards on February 5, 1971 to Gail Fisher for her role on Mannix. It was presented under the title Best Supporting Actress – Television Series before changing to its current title in 1980.

Since its inception, the award has been given to 45 actresses. Patricia Clarkson is the current recipient of the award for her portrayal of Adora Crellin on Sharp Objects. Valerie Bertinelli, Laura Dern, Faye Dunaway, and Polly Holliday have won the most awards in this category with two each. Rhea Perlman has been nominated for the award on six occasions, the most within the category.

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries, or Television Film
Awarded forBest Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Miniseries, or Television Film
CountryUnited States
Presented byHollywood Foreign Press Association
First awardedFebruary 5, 1971
Currently held byPatricia Clarkson,
Sharp Objects (2018)
Most awards
Websitegoldenglobes.org

Winners and nominees

Listed below are the winners of the award for each year, as well as the other nominees:

Key Meaning
double-dagger Indicates the winning actress
Gail Fisher Mark Stewart Mannix 1970
Gail Fisher was the first winner in this category for her role in Mannix as Peggy Fair. She would later receive two more nominations.
Julie Kavner 1974
Julie Kavner received four nominations for her performance on Rhoda as Brenda Morgenstern.
Hermione Baddley 2 Allan Warren
Hermione Baddeley won the award for her portrayal of Mrs. Nell Naugatuck in Maude.
Sally Struthers
Sally Struthers received four nominations for her performance on All in the Family as Gloria Stivic.
Polly Holliday Flo
Polly Holliday won two consecutive awards in 1978 and 1979 for her role in Alice as Florence "Flo" Castleberry, tying with Valerie Bertinelli and Faye Dunaway for the most wins in the category.
Valerie Bertinelli
Valerie Bertinelli won twice for her performance on One Day at a Time as Barbara Cooper, tying with Faye Dunaway and Polly Holliday for the most wins in the category.
Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck in 1941
Barbara Stanwyck (pictured right) won in 1983 for The Thorn Birds.
Faye Dunaway - 1971 - PBS
Faye Dunaway tied with Valerie Bertinelli and Polly Holliday for the most wins in the category, winning the award for her performances in the Ellis Island (1984) and Gia (1998).
Katherine Helmond
Katherine Helmond won the award in 1989 for her role on Who's the Boss? as Mona Robinson.
Rhea Perlman (1988)
Rhea Perlman received six nominations, the most in the category, for her portrayal of Carla Tortelli on Cheers.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus VF 2012 Shankbone 3
Julia Louis-Dreyfus won in 1993 for her performance on Seinfeld as Elaine Benes.
Kathy Bates by Gage Skidmore
Kathy Bates won the award for her performance on the HBO television film The Late Shift (1996).
Christine Baranski at 2015 PaleyFest
Christine Baranski received two nominations for her portrayal of Maryann Thorpe on Cybill.
Angelina Jolie 2 June 2014 (cropped)
Angelina Jolie won the award for her role in George Wallace (1997).
Cynthia Nixon at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival
Cynthia Nixon received four nominations for her performance on Sex and the City as Miranda Hobbes.
Vanessa Redgrave (2011) cropped
Vanessa Redgrave won for her performance on the HBO television film If These Walls Could Talk 2 (2000).
Kim Cattrall 2012 (cropped)
Kim Cattrall won in 2002 for her role in Sex and the City as Samantha Jones.
Sandra Oh 2016
Sandra Oh won the award for her portrayal of Cristina Yang on Grey's Anatomy.
Chloe Sevigny Horror premiere 2015
Chloë Sevigny won for her performance on Big Love as Nicolette Grant.
Jessica Lange (Cropped)
Jessica Lange won the award for her role as Constance Langdon on the FX anthology series American Horror Story: Murder House.
Hayden Panettiere 2009 (Straighten Crop)
Hayden Panettiere received two nominations for her performance on Nashville.
Maura Tierney (cropped)
Maura Tierney won for her portrayal of Helen Solloway on The Affair.

Best Supporting Actress – Television Series

1970s

Year Actor Role Program Network Ref
1970
(28th)
Gail Fisher Award winner Peggy Fair Mannix CBS [1]
Sue Ane Langdon Lilian Nuvo Arnie CBS
Miyoshi Umeki Mrs. Livingston The Courtship of Eddie's Father ABC
Karen Valentine Miss Alice Johnson Room 222
Lesley Ann Warren Dana Lambert Mission: Impossible CBS
1971
(29th)
Sue Ane Langdon Award winner Lilian Nuvo Arnie CBS [2]
Amanda Blake Miss Kitty Russell Gunsmoke CBS
Gail Fisher Peggy Fair Mannix
Sally Struthers Gloria Stivic All in the Family
Lily Tomlin Various Characters Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In NBC
1972
(30th)
Ruth Buzzi Award winner Various Characters Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In NBC [3]
Susan Dey Laurie Partridge The Partridge Family ABC
Vicki Lawrence Various Characters The Carol Burnett Show CBS
Audra Lindley Amy Fitzgerald Bridget Loves Bernie
Sally Struthers Gloria Stivic All in the Family
Elena Verdugo Consuelo Lopez Marcus Welby, M.D. ABC
1973
(31st)
Ellen Corby Award winner Esther Walton The Waltons CBS [4]
Gail Fisher Peggy Fair Mannix CBS
Valerie Harper Rhoda Morgenstern The Mary Tyler Moore Show
Sally Struthers Gloria Stivic All in the Family
Loretta Swit Maj. Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan M*A*S*H
1974
(32nd)
Betty Garrett Award winner Irene Lorenzo All in the Family CBS [5]
Ellen Corby Esther Walton The Waltons CBS
Julie Kavner Brenda Morgenstern Rhoda
Vicki Lawrence Various Characters The Carol Burnett Show
Nancy Walker Mildred McMillan & Wife NBC
1975
(33rd)
Hermione Baddeley Award winner Mrs. Nell Naugatuck Maude CBS [6]
Susan Howard Maggie Petrocelli Petrocelli NBC
Julie Kavner Brenda Morgenstern Rhoda CBS
Nancy Walker Mildred McMillan & Wife NBC
Ida Morgenstern Rhoda CBS
1976
(34th)
Josette Banzet Award winner Miss Lenaut Rich Man, Poor Man ABC [7]
Adrienne Barbeau Carol Traynor Maude CBS
Darleen Carr Tommy Caldwell Once an Eagle NBC
Ellen Corby Esther Walton The Waltons CBS
Julie Kavner Brenda Morgenstern Rhoda
Vicki Lawrence Various Characters The Carol Burnett Show
Anne Meara Sally Gallagher Rhoda
Sally Struthers Gloria Stivic All in the Family
1977
(35th)
No Award
1978
(36th)
Polly Holliday Award winner Florence "Flo" Castleberry Alice NBC [8]
Marilu Henner Elaine Nardo Taxi ABC
Julie Kavner Brenda Morgenstern Rhoda CBS
Linda Kelsey Billie Newman Lou Grant
Audra Lindley Helen Roper Three's Company ABC
Nancy Walker Ida Morgenstern Rhoda CBS
1979
(37th)
Polly Holliday Award winner Florence "Flo" Castleberry Alice CBS [9]
Loni Anderson Jennifer Marlowe WKRP in Cincinnati CBS
Marilu Henner Elaine Nardo Taxi ABC
Beth Howland Vera Louise Gorman Alice CBS
Linda Kelsey Billie Newman Lou Grant

Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film

1980s

Year Actor Role Program Network Ref
1980
(38th)
Valerie Bertinelli Award winner Barbara Cooper One Day at a Time CBS [10]
Diane Ladd Award winner Isabelle "Belle" Dupree Alice
Marilu Henner Elaine Nardo Taxi ABC
Beth Howland Vera Louise Gorman Alice CBS
Linda Kelsey Billie Newman Lou Grant
1981
(39th)
Valerie Bertinelli Award winner Barbara Cooper One Day at a Time CBS [11]
Danielle Brisebois Stephanie Mills Archie Bunker's Place CBS
Beth Howland Vera Louise Gorman Alice
Marilu Henner Elaine Nardo Taxi ABC
Lauren Tewes Julie McCoy The Love Boat
1982
(40th)
Shelley Long Award winner Diane Chambers Cheers NBC [12]
Valerie Bertinelli Barbara Cooper One Day at a Time CBS
Marilu Henner Elaine Nardo Taxi ABC
Beth Howland Vera Louise Gorman Alice CBS
Carol Kane Simka Dahblitz Taxi ABC
Loretta Swit Margaret Houlihan M*A*S*H CBS
1983
(41st)
Barbara Stanwyck Award winner Mary Carson The Thorn Birds ABC [13]
Polly Holliday Aunt Minerva The Gift of Love: A Christmas Story CBS
Angela Lansbury Amanda Fenwick
Piper Laurie Anne Mueller The Thorn Birds ABC
Jean Simmons Fee Cleary
Victoria Tennant Pamela Tudsbury The Winds of War
1984
(42nd)
Faye Dunaway Award winner Maud Charteris Ellis Island CBS [14]
Selma Diamond Selma Hacker Night Court NBC
Marla Gibbs Florence Johnston The Jeffersons CBS
Gina Lollobrigida Francesca Gioberti Falcon Crest
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers NBC
Roxana Zal Amelia Bennett Something About Amelia ABC
1985
(43rd)
Sylvia Sidney Award winner Beatrice McKenna An Early Frost NBC [15]
Lesley-Anne Down Madeline Fabray North and South ABC
Katherine Helmond Mona Robinson Who's the Boss?
Kate Reid Linda Loman Death of a Salesman CBS
Inga Swenson Gretchen Kraus Benson ABC
1986
(44th)
Olivia de Havilland Award winner Dowager Empress Maria Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna NBC [16]
Justine Bateman Mallory Keaton Family Ties NBC
Piper Laurie Annie Gilbert Promise CBS
Lilli Palmer Tsarina Natalya Peter the Great NBC
Geraldine Page Itta Halaunbrenner Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story ABC
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers NBC
1987
(45th)
Claudette Colbert Award winner Alice Grenville The Two Mrs. Grenvilles NBC [17]
Allyce Beasley Agnes DiPesto Moonlighting ABC
Julia Duffy Stephanie Vanderkellen Newhart CBS
Christine Lahti Althea Milford Amerika ABC
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers NBC
1988
(46th)
Katherine Helmond Award winner Mona Robinson Who's the Boss? ABC [18]
Jackée Harry Sandra Clark 227 NBC
Swoosie Kurtz Doris Steadman Baja Oklahoma HBO
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers NBC
Susan Ruttan Roxanne Melman L.A. Law
1989
(47th)
Amy Madigan Award winner Sarah Weddington Roe vs. Wade NBC [19]
Anjelica Huston Clara Allen Lonesome Dove CBS
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers NBC
Susan Ruttan Roxanne Melman L.A. Law
Julie Sommars Julie Marsh Matlock

1990s

Year Actor Role Program Network Ref
1990
(48th)
Piper Laurie Award winner Catherine Martell Twin Peaks ABC [20]
Sherilyn Fenn Audrey Horne Twin Peaks ABC
Faith Ford Corky Sherwood Murphy Brown CBS
Marg Helgenberger Karen "K.C." Koloski China Beach ABC
Park Overall Laverne Todd Empty Nest NBC
1991
(49th)
Amanda Donohoe Award winner Cara Jean Lamb L.A. Law NBC [21]
Sammi Davis Caroline Hailey Homefront ABC
Faith Ford Corky Sherwood Murphy Brown CBS
Estelle Getty Sophia Petrillo The Golden Girls NBC
Park Overall Laverne Todd Empty Nest
Rhea Perlman Carla Tortelli Cheers
Jean Stapleton Henny Fire in the Dark CBS
1992
(50th)
Joan Plowright Award winner Olga Alliluyeva Stalin HBO [22]
Olympia Dukakis Dolly Sinatra Sinatra CBS
Laurie Metcalf Jackie Harris Roseanne ABC
Park Overall Laverne Todd Empty Nest NBC
Amanda Plummer Lusia Burke Miss Rose White
Gena Rowlands Honora Swift Crazy in Love TNT
1993
(51st)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus Award winner Elaine Benes Seinfeld NBC [23]
Cynthia Gibb Rose Hovick Gypsy CBS
Ann-Margret Sally Jackson Alex Haley's Queen
Cecilia Peck Margaret Church The Portrait TNT
Theresa Saldana Rachel Scali The Commish ABC
1994
(52nd)
Miranda Richardson Award winner Charlie Maguire Fatherland HBO [24]
Sônia Braga Regina de Carvalho The Burning Season HBO
Tyne Daly Alice Henderson Christy CBS
Jane Leeves Daphne Moon Frasier NBC
Laura Leighton Sydney Andrews Melrose Place Fox
Julia Louis-Dreyfus Elaine Benes Seinfeld NBC
Laurie Metcalf Jackie Harris Roseanne ABC
Leigh Taylor-Young Rachel Harris Picket Fences CBS
Liz Torres Mahalia Sanchez The John Larroquette Show NBC
1995
(53rd)
Shirley Knight Award winner Peggy Buckey Indictment: The McMartin Trial HBO [25]
Christine Baranski Maryann Thorpe Cybill CBS
Judy Davis Diane Divelbess Serving in Silence: The Margarethe Cammermeyer Story NBC
Melanie Griffith Dora DuFran Buffalo Girls CBS
Lisa Kudrow Phoebe Buffay Friends NBC
Julianna Margulies Carol Hathaway ER
1996
(54th)
Kathy Bates Award winner Helen Kushnick The Late Shift HBO [26]
Christine Baranski Maryann Thorpe Cybill CBS
Cher Dr. Beth Thompson If These Walls Could Talk HBO
Kristen Johnston Sally Solomon 3rd Rock from the Sun NBC
Greta Scacchi Tsarina Alexandra Rasputin: Dark Servant of Destiny HBO
1997
(55th)
Angelina Jolie Award winner Cornelia Wallace George Wallace TNT [27]
Joely Fisher Paige Clark Ellen ABC
Della Reese Tess Touched by an Angel CBS
Gloria Reuben Jeanie Boulet ER NBC
Mare Winningham Lurleen Wallace George Wallace TNT
1998
(56th)
Faye Dunaway Award winner Wilhelmina Cooper Gia HBO [28]
Camryn Manheim Award winner Ellenor Frutt The Practice ABC
Helena Bonham Carter Morgan le Fay Merlin NBC
Jane Krakowski Elaine Vassal Ally McBeal Fox
Wendie Malick Nina Van Horn Just Shoot Me! NBC
Susan Sullivan Kitty Montgomery Dharma & Greg ABC
1999
(57th)
Nancy Marchand Award winner Livia Soprano The Sopranos HBO [29]
Kathy Bates Miss Agatha Hannigan Annie ABC
Jacqueline Bisset Isabelle d'Arc Joan of Arc CBS
Kim Cattrall Samantha Jones Sex and the City HBO
Melanie Griffith Marion Davies RKO 281
Cynthia Nixon Miranda Hobbes Sex and the City
Miranda Richardson Dinah Pellerin The Big Brass Ring Showtime

2000s

Year Actor Role Program Network Ref
2000
(58th)
Vanessa Redgrave Award winner Edith Tree If These Walls Could Talk 2 HBO [30]
Kim Cattrall Samantha Jones Sex and the City HBO
Faye Dunaway Parker "Meg" Gable Running Mates TNT
Allison Janney C. J. Cregg The West Wing NBC
Megan Mullally Karen Walker Will & Grace
Cynthia Nixon Miranda Hobbes Sex and the City HBO
2001
(59th)
Rachel Griffiths Award winner Brenda Chenowith Six Feet Under HBO [31]
Jennifer Aniston Rachel Green Friends NBC
Tammy Blanchard Young Judy Garland Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows ABC
Allison Janney C. J. Cregg The West Wing NBC
Megan Mullally Karen Walker Will & Grace
2002
(60th)
Kim Cattrall Award winner Samantha Jones Sex and the City HBO [32]
Megan Mullally Karen Walker Will & Grace NBC
Cynthia Nixon Miranda Hobbes Sex and the City HBO
Parker Posey Jinger Heath Hell on Heels: The Battle of Mary Kay CBS
Gena Rowlands Virginia Miller Hysterical Blindness HBO
2003
(61st)
Mary-Louise Parker Award winner Harper Pitt Angels in America HBO [33]
Kim Cattrall Samantha Jones Sex and the City HBO
Kristin Davis Charlotte York Goldenblatt
Megan Mullally Karen Walker Will & Grace NBC
Cynthia Nixon Miranda Hobbes Sex and the City HBO
2004
(62nd)
Anjelica Huston Award winner Carrie Chapman Catt Iron Jawed Angels HBO [34]
Drea de Matteo Adriana La Cerva The Sopranos HBO
Nicollette Sheridan Edie Britt Desperate Housewives ABC
Charlize Theron Britt Ekland The Life and Death of Peter Sellers HBO
Emily Watson Anne Howe
2005
(63rd)
Sandra Oh Award winner Dr. Cristina Yang Grey's Anatomy ABC [35]
Candice Bergen Shirley Schmidt Boston Legal ABC
Camryn Manheim Gladys Presley Elvis CBS
Elizabeth Perkins Celia Hodes Weeds Showtime
Joanne Woodward Francine Whiting Empire Falls HBO
2006
(64th)
Emily Blunt Award winner Natasha Warner Gideon's Daughter BBC America [36]
Toni Collette Kathy Graham Tsunami: The Aftermath HBO
Katherine Heigl Dr. Isobel "Izzie" Stevens Grey's Anatomy ABC
Sarah Paulson Harriet Hayes Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip NBC
Elizabeth Perkins Celia Hodes Weeds Showtime
2007
(65th)
Samantha Morton Award winner Myra Hindley Longford HBO [37]
Rose Byrne Ellen Parsons Damages FX
Rachel Griffiths Sarah Whedon Brothers & Sisters ABC
Katherine Heigl Dr. Isobel "Izzie" Stevens Grey's Anatomy
Anna Paquin Elaine Goodale Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee HBO
Jaime Pressly Joy Turner My Name Is Earl NBC
2008
(66th)
Laura Dern Award winner Katherine Harris Recount HBO [38]
Eileen Atkins Deborah Jenkyns Cranford PBS
Melissa George Laura Hill In Treatment HBO
Rachel Griffiths Sarah Whedon Brothers & Sisters ABC
Dianne Wiest Dr. Gina Toll In Treatment HBO
2009
(67th)
Chloë Sevigny Award winner Nicolette "Nicki" Grant Big Love HBO [39]
Jane Adams Tanya Skagle Hung HBO
Rose Byrne Ellen Parsons Damages FX
Jane Lynch Sue Sylvester Glee Fox
Janet McTeer Clementine Churchill Into the Storm HBO

2010s

Year Actor Role Program Network Ref
2010
(68th)
Jane Lynch Award winner Sue Sylvester Glee Fox [40]
Hope Davis Hillary Clinton The Special Relationship HBO
Kelly Macdonald Margaret Schroeder Boardwalk Empire
Julia Stiles Lumen Pierce Dexter Showtime
Sofía Vergara Gloria Delgado-Pritchett Modern Family ABC
2011
(69th)
Jessica Lange Award winner Constance Langdon American Horror Story FX [41]
Kelly Macdonald Margaret Thompson Boardwalk Empire HBO
Maggie Smith Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham Downton Abbey PBS
Sofía Vergara Gloria Delgado-Pritchett Modern Family ABC
Evan Rachel Wood Veda Pierce Mildred Pierce HBO
2012
(70th)
Maggie Smith Award winner Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham Downton Abbey PBS [42]
Hayden Panettiere Juliette Barnes Nashville ABC
Archie Panjabi Kalinda Sharma The Good Wife CBS
Sarah Paulson Nicolle Wallace Game Change HBO
Sofía Vergara Gloria Delgado-Pritchett Modern Family ABC
2013
(71st)
Jacqueline Bisset Award winner Lady Lavinia Cremone Dancing on the Edge Starz [43]
Janet McTeer Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers The White Queen Starz
Hayden Panettiere Juliette Barnes Nashville ABC
Monica Potter Kristina Braverman Parenthood NBC
Sofía Vergara Gloria Delgado-Pritchett Modern Family ABC
2014
(72nd)
Joanne Froggatt Award winner Anna Bates Downton Abbey PBS [44]
Uzo Aduba Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren Orange Is the New Black Netflix
Kathy Bates Ethel Darling American Horror Story: Freak Show FX
Allison Janney Bonnie Plunkett Mom CBS
Michelle Monaghan Maggie Hart True Detective HBO
2015
(73rd)
Maura Tierney Award winner Helen Solloway The Affair Showtime [45]
Uzo Aduba Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren Orange Is the New Black Netflix
Joanne Froggatt Anna Bates Downton Abbey PBS
Regina King Aliyah Shadeed American Crime ABC
Judith Light Shelly Pfefferman Transparent Amazon
2016
(74th)
Olivia Colman Award winner Angela Burr The Night Manager AMC [46]
Lena Headey Cersei Lannister Game of Thrones HBO
Chrissy Metz Kate Pearson This Is Us NBC
Mandy Moore Rebecca Pearson
Thandie Newton Maeve Millay Westworld HBO
2017
(75th)
Laura Dern Award winner Renata Klein Big Little Lies HBO [47]
Ann Dowd Aunt Lydia The Handmaid's Tale Hulu
Chrissy Metz Kate Pearson This Is Us NBC
Michelle Pfeiffer Ruth Madoff The Wizard of Lies HBO
Shailene Woodley Jane Chapman Big Little Lies
2018
(76th)
Patricia Clarkson Award winner Adora Crellin Sharp Objects HBO
Alex Borstein Susie Myerson The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Amazon
Penélope Cruz Donatella Versace The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story FX
Thandie Newton Maeve Millay Westworld HBO
Yvonne Strahovski Serena Joy Waterford The Handmaid's Tale Hulu

Superlatives

Multiple wins

Wins Name
2 Valerie Bertinelli
Laura Dern
Faye Dunaway
Polly Holliday

Multiple nominations

Nominations Name
6 Rhea Perlman
5 Marilu Henner
4 Kim Cattrall
Beth Howland
Julie Kavner
Megan Mullally
Cynthia Nixon
Sally Struthers
Nancy Walker
Sofía Vergara
3 Kathy Bates
Valerie Bertinelli
Ellen Corby
Faye Dunaway
Gail Fisher
Rachel Griffiths
Polly Holliday
Allison Janney
Linda Kelsey
Piper Laurie
Vicki Lawrence
Park Overall
2 Uzo Aduba
Christine Baranski
Jacqueline Bisset
Rose Byrne
Laura Dern
Faith Ford
Joanne Froggatt
Melanie Griffith
Katherine Heigl
Katherine Helmond
Anjelica Huston
Sue Ane Langdon
Audra Lindley
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Jane Lynch
Kelly Macdonald
Camryn Manheim
Chrissy Metz
Laurie Metcalf
Thandie Newton
Hayden Panettiere
Sarah Paulson
Elizabeth Perkins
Miranda Richardson
Gena Rowlands
Susan Ruttan
Maggie Smith
Loretta Swit
Janet McTeer

See also

References

  1. ^ "The 28th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1971)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  2. ^ "The 29th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1972)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  3. ^ "The 30th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1973)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  4. ^ "The 31st Annual Golden Globe Awards (1974)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  5. ^ "The 32nd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1975)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  6. ^ "The 33rd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1976)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  7. ^ "The 34th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1977)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  8. ^ "The 36th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1979)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  9. ^ "The 37th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1980)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  10. ^ "The 38th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1981)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  11. ^ "The 39th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1982)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  12. ^ "The 40th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1983)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  13. ^ "The 41st Annual Golden Globe Awards (1984)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  14. ^ "The 42nd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1985)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  15. ^ "The 43rd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1986)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  16. ^ "The 44th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1987)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  17. ^ "The 45th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1988)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  18. ^ "The 46th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1989)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  19. ^ "The 47th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1990)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  20. ^ "The 48th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1991)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  21. ^ "The 49th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1992)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  22. ^ "The 50th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1993)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  23. ^ "The 51st Annual Golden Globe Awards (1994)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  24. ^ "The 52nd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1995)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  25. ^ "The 53rd Annual Golden Globe Awards (1996)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  26. ^ "The 54th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1997)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  27. ^ "The 55th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1998)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  28. ^ "The 56th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1999)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  29. ^ "The 57th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2000)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  30. ^ "The 58th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2001)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  31. ^ "The 59th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2002)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  32. ^ "The 60th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2003)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  33. ^ "The 61st Annual Golden Globe Awards (2004)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  34. ^ "The 62nd Annual Golden Globe Awards (2005)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  35. ^ "The 63rd Annual Golden Globe Awards (2006)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  36. ^ "The 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2007)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  37. ^ "The 65th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2008)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  38. ^ "The 66th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2009)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  39. ^ "The 67th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2010)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  40. ^ "The 68th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2011)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  41. ^ "The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2012)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  42. ^ "The 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2013)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  43. ^ "The 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards (2014)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  44. ^ "The 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards (2015)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  45. ^ "The 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards (2016)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  46. ^ "The 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2017)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 12 December 2016.
  47. ^ "The 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards (2018)". GoldenGlobes.com. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Retrieved 11 December 2017.
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The Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series is one of the award categories presented annually by the Critics' Choice Television Awards (BTJA) to recognize the work done by television actresses. It was introduced in 2011 when the event was first initiated. The winners are selected by a group of television critics that are part of the Broadcast Television Critics Association.

Downton Abbey (series 2)

The second series of the British historical period drama television series Downton Abbey aired from 18 September 2011 to 6 November 2011, comprising a total of 8 episodes and one Christmas Special episode aired on 25 December 2011. It was broadcast in the United Kingdom on ITV, and in the United States on PBS, starting on 8 January 2012. Series 2 explored the lives of the Crawley family and servants during and after the First World War.

Series 2 received widespread acclaim, with critics praising its cast, historical depictions, and story's arc. The viewing figures significantly increased compared with series 1, with an average of 11 million viewers per episode. The series was nominated for several industry awards, and won the TCA Award for Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries and Specials. Maggie Smith received critical praise for her performance as Violet Crawley, which earned her the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film.

Ellen Parsons

Ellen Parsons is a fictional character on the American legal thriller series Damages. The character was created by the writer trio of Glenn Kessler, Todd A. Kessler, and Daniel Zelman.

Ellen's transformation from ambitious, idealistic and somewhat naïve law school graduate to a sophisticated, ruthless attorney is one of the main themes of the show. The mentor-protegee relationship between her and Patty Hewes shapes and advances the character throughout the show. After working for Patty, being an informant for the FBI, and joining the public attorney's office, she finally opens her own law firm and builds a name for herself.

In the series finale, Ellen gives up being a lawyer after learning that she is pregnant and becomes a happy wife and mother. Patty enters a shop where Ellen and her daughter are happily looking at goodies. Ellen sees Patty but ignores her. We see Ellen and her child leaving the store and talking about going to see "daddy" who we assume is Chris. Back in her car, Patty fantasizes that Ellen approaches the car and through the window thanks her for all she's done for her. Patty pulls herself back to reality and is last seen contemplating her life...successful, yet entirely alone.

The character was widely praised, as well as Byrne's portrayal. Byrne was nominated twice for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series in 2009 and 2010, and twice for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries, or Television Film in 2008 and 2010.

Faye Dunaway filmography

Faye Dunaway is an American actress who appeared in over seventy films, thirty television shows, eleven plays and two music videos. Regarded as one of the greatest actresses of her generation, she was one of the leading actresses during the golden age of New Hollywood. After her film debut The Happening, she starred in the gangster film Bonnie and Clyde, in which she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress. She starred with Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) . In 1969, she co-starred with Kirk Douglas in Elia Kazan's drama The Arrangement. The following year, she starred with Dustin Hoffman in Little Big Man. In 1970, her performance in Jerry Schatzberg's experimental drama Puzzle of a Downfall Child earned her a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama. She portrayed Milady de Winter in Richard Lester's The Three Musketeers (1973) and The Four Musketeers (1974).

In 1974, Dunaway starred in Roman Polanski's crime film Chinatown, in which she was nominated for the Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA for her performance. That same year, she appeared in the all-star disaster epic The Towering Inferno. In 1975, her role in Sydney Pollack's political thriller Three Days of the Condor earned her a fourth Golden Globe nomination. Dunaway received the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama for her performance in Sidney Lumet's satire Network (1976). She then starred in the thriller Eyes of Laura Mars (1978) and the drama The Champ (1979). Her controversial portrayal of Joan Crawford in the 1981 film Mommie Dearest became one of her most famous roles, but she later blamed the film for hurting her career.

She won a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film for her work in the miniseries Ellis Island (1985) and received critical acclaim for her performance in Barbet Schroeder's drama Barfly (1987), opposite Mickey Rourke. Her role in a 1993 episode of Columbo earned her a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series. She co-starred with Johnny Depp twice, in the surrealist comedy-drama Arizona Dream (1993) and the romantic comedy Don Juan DeMarco (1995). Her portrayal of Wilhelmina Cooper in the drama Gia (1998) with Angelina Jolie earned her a third Golden Globe Award, for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television. Dunaway also appeared in the James Gray-directed crime film The Yards (2000) and Roger Avary's satirical black comedy The Rules of Attraction (2002).

Dunaway started her acting career on Broadway and appeared in several plays throughout her career, including A Man for All Seasons (1961–63), After the Fall (1964), Hogan's Goat (1965–67) and A Streetcar Named Desire (1973). She was awarded the Sarah Siddons Award for her portrayal of opera singer Maria Callas in Master Class (1996). Dunaway also appeared in two music videos, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers' Into the Great Wide Open in 1991 and Hill Zaini's I Heard in 2010.

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress may refer to:

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture or

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film

Jacqueline Bisset

Winifred Jacqueline Fraser Bisset ( BISS-it; born 13 September 1944) is an English actress. She began her film career in 1965, first coming to prominence in 1968 with roles in The Detective, Bullitt, and The Sweet Ride, for which she received a most promising newcomer Golden Globe nomination. In the 1970s, she starred in Airport (1970), Day for Night (1973) which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Deep (1977), and Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? (1978), which earned her a Golden Globe nomination as Best Actress in a Comedy.

Her other film and TV credits include Rich and Famous (1981), Class (1983), her Golden Globe-nominated role in Under the Volcano (1984), her Cesar-nominated role in La Cérémonie (1995), her Emmy-nominated role in the miniseries Joan of Arc (1999) and the BBC miniseries Dancing on the Edge (2013), for which she won a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress (television).

She received France's highest honour, the Légion d'honneur, in 2010. She speaks English, French and Italian.

Julia Stiles

Julia O'Hara Stiles (born March 28, 1981) is an American actress. Born and raised in New York City, Stiles began acting at age 11 and made her screen debut as Erica Dansby in six episodes of the television series Ghostwriter (1993–1994). Her first film role was in I Love You, I Love You Not (1996), followed by a leading role in the thriller Wicked (1998), for which she was awarded the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Award for Best Actress. She went on to gain prominence for her lead roles in teen films such as 10 Things I Hate About You (1999) for which she won MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance and was nominated for two Teen Choice Awards, Down to You (2000), for which she was nominated for another two Teen Choice Awards, and Save the Last Dance (2001), winning the Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress and was nominated for the MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance.

Stiles later transitioned to more adult roles, garnering a nomination for the Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture for her performance in The Business of Strangers (2001), Mona Lisa Smile (2003), and The Omen (2006). She became known to a wider audience for her supporting role alongside Matt Damon as Nicky Parsons in the Bourne film series (2002–2016). She had a recurring role as Lumen Pierce in the fifth season of the Showtime series Dexter (2010), a role that earned her nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film and the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series. As a member of the cast of Silver Linings Playbook (2012), Stiles was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture.

Stiles appears in the Blue web series also broadcast on television (2012–present). Other film roles include romantic comedy The Prince and Me (2004), noir-inspired drama-thriller A Little Trip to Heaven (2005), British-Canadian co-production The Cry of the Owl (2009), Between Us (2012), Out of the Dark (2014), and with Anthony Hopkins in Blackway (2016) (also known as Go With Me).

Katherine Helmond

Katherine Marie Helmond (July 5, 1929 – February 23, 2019) was an American film, theater, and television actress and director. Over her five decades of television acting, she was known for her starring role as ditzy matriarch Jessica Tate on the sitcom Soap (1977–1981) and her co-starring role as feisty mother Mona Robinson on Who's the Boss? (1984–1992). She also played Doris Sherman on Coach and Lois Whelan (the mother of Debra Barone) on Everybody Loves Raymond. She also appeared as a guest on several talk and variety shows.

Helmond had supporting roles in films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Family Plot (1976) and Terry Gilliam's Brazil (1985). She also voiced Lizzie in the Cars film trilogy by Disney/Pixar between 2006 and 2017.

Katherine Helmond filmography

Katherine Marie Helmond (July 5, 1929 – February 23, 2019) was an American film, theater, and television actress and director. Over her five decades of television acting, she was known for her starring role as ditzy matriarch Jessica Tate on the ABC prime time soap opera sitcom Soap (1977–1981) and her co-starring role as feisty mother Mona Robinson on Who's the Boss? (1984–1992). She also played Doris Sherman on Coach and Lois Whelan, the mother of Debra Barone on Everybody Loves Raymond. She also appeared as a guest on talk and variety shows.Helmond had supporting roles in films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Family Plot (1976) and Terry Gilliam's Brazil (1985). She also voiced Lizzie in the three Cars films by Disney/Pixar.

List of Emily Blunt performances

Emily Blunt is an English-American actress. She began her career as a teenager on the British stage, appearing alongside Judi Dench in a West End production of The Royal Family in 2001. Her first screen appearance was in the television film Boudica (2003), and she made her film debut with the lead role of a teenager exploring her homosexuality in Paweł Pawlikowski's drama My Summer of Love (2004). For playing the titular role of an emotionally troubled young woman in the BBC television film Gideon's Daughter (2006), Blunt won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film. In the same year, she gained wider recognition for playing a fashion editor's assistant in the American comedy The Devil Wears Prada, earning a nomination for the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.Following this breakthrough, Blunt went on to play lead roles in several films, including the period drama The Young Victoria (2009), the science fiction romance The Adjustment Bureau (2011), and the romance Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011). In 2014, she starred as a hardened sergeant in the action film Edge of Tomorrow, her highest-grossing release, and as the Baker's Wife in the musical fantasy Into the Woods. She went on to gain praise for playing a principled FBI agent in the crime film Sicario (2015) and an alcoholic in the thriller The Girl on the Train (2016); the latter earned her a nomination for the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. In 2018, she starred in the critically acclaimed horror film A Quiet Place, directed by her husband John Krasinski, and in the musical fantasy Mary Poppins Returns, in which she played the title character. The former earned her the Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Supporting Actress.Alongside her screen work, Blunt has provided her voice to several animated films, including Gnomeo & Juliet (2011) and its sequel Sherlock Gnomes (2018). She has also narrated the audiobook Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives in 2010, and recorded songs for the soundtrack of her films Into the Woods, My Little Pony: The Movie, and Mary Poppins Returns.

List of Jane Lynch performances

This is a list of works by American actress, singer, and comedian Jane Lynch.

List of awards and nominations received by Chloë Sevigny

The following is a list of awards and nominations received by Chloë Sevigny.

Sevigny is an Academy Award nominated actress, who was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 2000 for her role in Boys Don't Cry. She also was nominated for a Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award and won a Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture.

Known for her roles in film, she has guest starred in numerous television shows since the early-2000s and from 2006 to 2011, she starred as Nicolette Grant on Big Love. Sevigny won a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film in 2010 for her role as Grant.

List of awards and nominations received by Olivia Colman

Olivia Colman is an English actress who has received various awards and nominations, including an Academy Award, three British Academy Television Awards, a British Academy Film Award, two Golden Globe Awards, two Critics' Choice Awards, and three Satellite Awards.

In 2011, she received critical acclaim for her performance in the drama film Tyrannosaur, and was nominated for the Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture and won Best Actress at the British Independent Film Awards. From 2013 to 2017, she starred in the serial crime drama series Broadchurch, for which she won the British Academy Television Award for Best Actress and was nominated for the International Emmy Award for Best Actress. For her role in the miniseries The Night Manager (2016), she won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film and was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie.

Colman has collaborated twice with Yorgos Lanthimos. She first starred in the black comedy film The Lobster (2015), for which she won the BIFA Award for Best Supporting Actress. She then starred as Anne, Queen of Great Britain in the historical comedy drama film The Favourite (2018). For her performance in the latter, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress, BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, the BIFA Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a British Independent Film, the Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress in a Comedy, the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Comedy or Musical, the Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Comedy or Musical, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress, and was nominated for the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role.

Maura Tierney

Maura Lynn Tierney (born February 3, 1965) is an American film and television actress best known for her roles as Lisa Miller on the sitcom NewsRadio, Abby Lockhart on the medical drama ER and Helen Solloway on the television drama The Affair for which she won a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film in 2016.

Piper Laurie

Piper Laurie (born Rosetta Jacobs; January 22, 1932) is an American stage and screen actress known for her roles in the films The Hustler (1961), Carrie (1976), and Children of a Lesser God (1986), all of which brought her Academy Award nominations. She is also known for her performances as Kirsten Arnesen in the original TV production of Days of Wine and Roses and as Catherine Martell in the cult television series Twin Peaks, for which she won a Golden Globe Award in 1991. In 2018, she appeared in the film White Boy Rick. In addition, she appeared with Dana Andrews, Rex Reason, William Talman, Milburn Stone, Douglas Spenser, and others in the 1956 Western "Smoke Signal".

Roxana Zal

Roxana Zal (born November 8, 1969, Malibu, California) is an American actress.

Sex and the City (season 5)

The fifth season of the American television romantic sitcom Sex and the City aired in the United States on HBO. The show was created by Darren Star while Star, Michael Patrick King, John P. Melfi, series lead actress Sarah Jessica Parker, Cindy Chupack, and Jenny Bicks served as executive producers. The series was produced by Darren Star Productions, HBO Original Programming, and Warner Bros. Television. Parker portrays the lead character Carrie Bradshaw, while Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis and Cynthia Nixon played her best friends Samantha Jones, Charlotte York, and Miranda Hobbes.

In season five, Carrie, in the midst of a dating hiatus, lands a publishing deal for her column and begins a relationship with a fellow writer. Miranda becomes a mother with Steve and struggles to manage a job, dating life and her friendships with the other girls. Samantha dates Richard again, but battles with trust issues stemming from his infidelity. A recently divorced Charlotte gets into a legal battle with Trey's mother over their apartment and during the legal proceedings, falls in love with her lawyer.

The 5th season, airing on Sunday nights at 9:00 PM from July 21, 2002 (2002-07-21) to September 8, 2002 (2002-09-08), comprised eight episodes as opposed to the original 18 episode order due to Parker's pregnancy at the time of filming. In the United Kingdom, the season was broadcast on Wednesday nights between January 1 and February 19, 2003. The season received mixed to positive critical responses while receiving several awards and nominations, including winning the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film for Cattrall. The season averaged over 7 million viewers.

Sharp Objects (miniseries)

Sharp Objects is an American psychological thriller television miniseries based on Gillian Flynn's debut novel of the same name that premiered on July 8, 2018, on HBO. The series was created by Marti Noxon, directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, and stars Amy Adams, Patricia Clarkson, Chris Messina, Eliza Scanlen, Matt Craven, Henry Czerny, Taylor John Smith, Madison Davenport, Miguel Sandoval, Will Chase, Jackson Hurst, Sophia Lillis, Lulu Wilson, and Elizabeth Perkins. It follows Camille Preaker, an emotionally troubled reporter who returns to her hometown to cover the murders of two young girls.

The series received positive reviews, with many praising its visuals, dark atmosphere, direction and acting, particularly the performances of Adams, Clarkson, and Scanlen. Among its accolades, Clarkson won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film and Adams received a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film.

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film
Current awards
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Current awards
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