Goat Rocks Wilderness

Goat Rocks Wilderness is a U.S. wilderness area in Washington, United States, consisting of 108,096 acres (43,745 ha) of Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and Gifford Pinchot National Forest on the crest of the Cascade Range south of U.S. Highway 12. Its central feature is a number of rugged peaks, the Goat Rocks, that are named after the numerous mountain goats that live in the area.[2]

Extinct for some two million years, a volcano with an elevation of 12,000 feet (3,700 m) once dominated this landscape. The eroded remnant of this volcano consists of rugged peaks that average over 7,000 feet (2,100 m) elevation. The highest point among them is Gilbert Peak, at 8,184 feet (2,494 m) with a prominence of 3,664 feet (1,117 m). On the shaded northern slopes of the major peaks are the Packwood, McCall, Conrad, and Meade glaciers. The wilderness is drained by the North and South Forks of the Tieton, Cispus, and Cowlitz rivers and their tributaries. The lowest point in the wilderness is near Packwood Lake at 2,920 feet (890 m).

Oreamnos americanus 13A
Mountain goats above the North Fork of the Tieton River
Goat Rocks Wilderness
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
Goat Rocks Wilderness - Flickr - Joe Parks (2)
Map showing the location of Goat Rocks Wilderness
Map showing the location of Goat Rocks Wilderness
Map showing the location of Goat Rocks Wilderness
Map showing the location of Goat Rocks Wilderness
LocationLewis / Yakima counties, Washington, USA
Nearest cityYakima, WA
Coordinates46°30′44″N 121°27′14″W / 46.51222°N 121.45389°WCoordinates: 46°30′44″N 121°27′14″W / 46.51222°N 121.45389°W
Area108,096 acres (437.45 km2)[1]
EstablishedSeptember 3, 1964
Governing bodyU.S. Forest Service
Goat Rocks Wilderness

History

The wilderness values of this area were first recognized on February 13, 1931, when approximately 44,500 acres (180 km2) were dedicated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, as the Goat Rocks Primitive Area. In 1935, this was expanded to 72,440 acres (293 km2). In 1940, the area was increased to 82,680 acres (335 km2) and designated the Goat Rocks Wild Area by the Chief of the Forest Service. When Congress passed the Wilderness Act on September 3, 1964, this wild area became a wilderness, part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Congress added additional area in 1984. Forest Service management is designated to preserve and enhance the wild character of the Wilderness while providing for public use and enjoyment.[3]

Recreation

The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), stretching from Canada to Mexico, passes through the Goat Rocks. The Washington State portion of this trail was formerly known as the Washington Cascade Crest Trail completed in 1935. In 1968, it was designated as part of the PCT by the National Trail System Act. The Yakama Indian Reservation, bordering the Goat rocks Wilderness on the southeast side, is closed to the general public except for the Pacific Crest Trail route.[3]

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

  1. ^ "Goat Rocks Wilderness". Wilderness.net. University of Montana. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  2. ^ "Wilderness: Goat Rocks - Gifford Pinchot". Gifford Pinchot National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Goat Rocks Wilderness". Gifford Pinchot National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 26, 2015.

External links

Big Horn (Washington)

Big Horn is a tall peak in the Cascade Range in the U.S. state of Washington. This officially unnamed peak is the highest point in Lewis County. Big Horn, one of the Goat Rocks, is the second highest point on the ridge west of Gilbert Peak, in the Goat Rocks Wilderness. It is just west of the highest point on the ridge, called Goat Citadel. It is said to be the most difficult pitch on the easiest routes of Washington's 39 county high points. There is a 10-foot (3.0 m) vertical crack near Big Horn's summit. Fred Beckey rates this pitch as a difficult class 4.

Cispus River

The Cispus River is about 54 miles (87 km) long and flows into the Cowlitz River at Lake Scanewa in the Cascade Range of Washington. Its tributaries drain most of south-central and southeastern Lewis County, extreme northeast Skamania County, and some of western Yakima County.

Its main stem begins in Lewis County in a high, glacial valley to the north of Snowgrass Flats in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, located on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. From here the river flows in a southwesterly direction and takes on the waters of several important headwater tributaries such as Walupt Creek.

About 40 miles (64 km) from its mouth, the Cispus River receives Muddy Fork from the left. Muddy Fork starts 7 miles (11 km) from this junction, at Mount Adams' Lava Glacier and is named for the glacial debris and silt in the water which give the river a muddy appearance. The Cispus River flows through a heavily forested valley, much of the forest regrown after the Cispus Burn, which occurred the first decade of the 20th century and consumed most of the lower drainage.

The rushing Canyon Creek enters the river originating high on the slopes of Mount Adams. A few miles down the North Fork Cispus enters the main branch about 20 miles (32 km) from its start. From here on, the Cispus River flows westerly, passing campgrounds and trails in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Two tributaries, Yellowjacket and McCoy Creeks, flow into the river from the south about midway though its course. Beyond here, the river passes beneath Tower Rock, a prominent quartz diorite monolith on the south side of the river. Soon after this the river leaves the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and enters the Weyerhaeuser Cowlitz Tree Farm. The Cispus River ends its course entering the Cowlitz River at Lake Scanewa, just upstream from Cowlitz Falls and Riffe Lake.

There is a stream flow monitoring station on the river which sends its data live to the USGS. Whitewater rafting also takes place on the Cispus River.

Gifford Pinchot National Forest

Gifford Pinchot National Forest is a National Forest located in southern Washington, USA, managed by the United States Forest Service. With an area of 1.32 million acres (5300 km2), it extends 116 km along the western slopes of Cascade Range from Mount Rainier National Park to the Columbia River. The forest straddles the crest of the South Cascades of Washington State, spread out over broad, old growth forests, high mountain meadows, several glaciers, and numerous volcanic peaks. The forest's highest point is at 12,276 ft. at the top of Mount Adams, the second tallest volcano in the state after Rainier. It includes the 110,000-acre (450 km2) Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, established by Congress in 1982

Gilbert Peak (Washington)

Gilbert Peak (8,184 feet (2,494 m) is located in the Goat Rocks on the border of the Yakama Indian Reservation and Yakima County, in the U.S. state of Washington. Situated partly in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, Gilbert Peak is the highest summit in the Goat Rocks, which are the eroded remnants of an extinct stratovolcano. Meade Glacier is located on the southeastern slopes of the peak, while Conrad Glacier is on the north slope.

Goat Rocks

Goat Rocks is an extinct stratovolcano in the Cascade Range, located between Mount Rainier and Mount Adams in southern Washington, in the United States. Part of the Cascade Volcanoes, it was formed by the subduction of the Juan de Fuca Plate under the western edge of the North American Plate. The volcano was active from 3.2 million years ago until eruptions ceased between 1 and 0.5 million years ago. Throughout its complex eruptive history, volcanism shifted from silicic explosive eruptions to voluminous, mafic activity.

The volcano and the surrounding Goat Rocks Wilderness, established in 1964, are named after the numerous mountain goats which live in the area. The variable climate of the wilderness area supports a host of wildlife, including marmots, pikas, deer, and elk. Various peaks within the wilderness can be climbed or scrambled, and other activities such as hiking are permitted. The area is rife with minerals and resources, including coal, cobalt, copper, and base metals.

Ives Peak

Ives Peak, elevation 7,920+ ft (2,410+ m), is located in the Goat Rocks on the border of Lewis and Yakima Counties, in the U.S. state of Washington. Ives Peak is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness and the McCall Glacier on its eastern slopes. Additionally, the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail is near the west slopes of the peak.

List of Cascade Range topics

This article contains a list of volcanoes and a list of protected areas associated with the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest of North America.

McCall Glacier (Washington)

McCall Glacier is located in the Goat Rocks region in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is near to the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail and in the Goat Rocks Wilderness of Snoqualmie National Forest, .60 mi (0.97 km) southeast of Old Snowy Mountain. Packwood Glacier is .50 mi (0.80 km) to the west. Consisting of numerous small bodies of ice, the largest section of McCall Glacier is immediately east of Ives Peak (7,940 ft (2,420 m)).

Meade Glacier

Meade Glacier is located in the Goat Rocks region in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness of Snoqualmie National Forest, .25 mi (0.40 km) south of Conrad Glacier and immediately east of Gilbert Peak. Meade Glacier is split into three sections and the lower ablation zone at 6,400 ft (2,000 m) is not connected to the upper accumulation zone at 7,800 ft (2,400 m).

Mount Aix

Mount Aix is a 7,766 feet (2,367 m) mountain summit centrally located in the William O. Douglas Wilderness on land administered by the Wenatchee National Forest and is the highest point in that wilderness area. It is also 24 miles east-southeast of Mount Rainier in Yakima County of Washington state. Mount Aix is situated east of the crest of the Cascade Range, southeast of Bumping Lake, north of Bismarck Peak, and northwest of Rimrock Lake. Its nearest higher peak is Tieton Peak in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, 19.9 mi (32.0 km) to the south-southwest. Mount Aix is the highest peak in the entire region which is east of Mount Rainier National Park, north of Goat Rocks Wilderness, west of Yakima, and south of Mount Daniel (Alpine Lakes Wilderness), so it is quite prominent. Prior to 1897 (when Mount Aix was officially recognized by the USGS) the name was spelled as Mount Aiks on early survey maps and publications.

Naches River

The Naches River is a tributary of the Yakima River in central Washington in the United States. Beginning as the Little Naches River, it is about 75 miles (121 km) long. After the confluence of the Little Naches and Bumping River the name becomes simply the Naches River. The Naches and its tributaries drain a portion of the eastern side of the Cascade Range, east of Mount Rainier and northeast of Mount Adams. In terms of discharge, the Naches River is the largest tributary of the Yakima River.In its upper reaches, the Naches River basin includes rugged mountains and wildernesses. The lower Naches River and its tributary the Tieton River flow through valleys with towns and irrigated orchards northwest of Yakima, where the Naches River joins the Yakima River. Historically, the river served as an important travel corridor between the east and west sides of the Cascades, via Naches Pass, used by both Native Americans and settlers.

The river's name comes from the Indian words "naugh", meaning rough or turbulent, and "chez", meaning water.

Old Snowy Mountain

Old Snowy Mountain (7,880+ ft (2,400+ m)) is located in the Goat Rocks on the border of Lewis and Yakima Counties, in the U.S. state of Washington. Old Snowy Mountain is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness and is flanked by the McCall Glacier on its eastern slopes while the smaller Packwood Glacier is just northwest of the peak. Additionally, the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail is on the west slopes of the peak.

Packwood, Washington

Packwood is an unincorporated community located in easternmost Lewis County, Washington.

Packwood is located at the intersection of US Highway 12 and Gifford Pinchot National Forest Road 52 (Skate Creek Road). It is located between Mount Rainier National Park to the north and Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument to the south. Tatoosh Wilderness, Goat Rocks Wilderness, and William O. Douglas Wilderness are to the north, southeast, and northeast respectively, with the Gifford Pinchot National Forest as a buffer in all directions. Packwood is located in the upper Cowlitz valley, just downstream of the confluence of the Muddy and Clear forks of the Cowlitz. The White Pass Ski Area and Cascade Crest demark the eastern edge of the Packwood area, the town of Randle the west, and large expanses of forest, wilderness, and parkland the north and south.

Packwood was established as Sulphur Springs.

Packwood Glacier

Packwood Glacier is located in the Goat Rocks region in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is adjacent to the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail and in the Goat Rocks Wilderness of Gifford Pinchot National Forest, .30 mi (0.48 km) northwest of Old Snowy Mountain. McCall Glacier is .50 mi (0.80 km) to the east.

Packwood Lake

Packwood Lake is a freshwater lake in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in the Cascade Mountains of Washington. It is located near the town of Packwood and is a popular day hiking and overnight camping area. The southern half of the lake lies within the Goat Rocks Wilderness area.

The lake was named after William Packwood, an early settler.

Tieton River

The Tieton River is a tributary of the Naches River, in Yakima County, Washington in the United States.

The Tieton River begins in two forks, the North Fork Tieton River and South Fork Tieton River. The North Fork originates at McCall Glacier on the eastern sides of Old Snowy Mountain, Ives Peak, and the Goat Rocks for which the Goat Rocks Wilderness is named. Collecting headwater streams from other high mountains such as Tieton Peak, the North Fork flows northeast into Clear Lake, then into the west end of Rimrock Lake. The South Fork Tieton River begins at Meade Glacier on the eastern side of Gilbert Peak, also part of the Goat Rocks. The South Fork collects many streams as it flows generally north, entering Rimrock Lake near its east end.

Rimrock Lake is an artificial reservoir created by Tieton Dam and managed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The lake stores water for irrigation use as part of the Bureau of Reclamation's Yakima Project. The Tieton River proper flows out of Rimrock Lake at Tieton Dam. It flows generally east, joining the Naches River near the town of Tieton.

Walupt Lake

Walupt Lake is a large freshwater lake located in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in the Cascade Mountains of Washington. It is located near the town of Packwood and is popular for camping, boating, and hiking. The eastern half of the lake is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness. It is the deepest and second largest natural lake in Lewis County.

William O. Douglas Wilderness

The William O. Douglas Wilderness is a designated wilderness in the central portion of the state of Washington. It includes 169,081 acres (68,425 ha) located between the U.S. Route 12 and State Route 410 and is jointly administered by the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest and the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. It shares a boundary with the Mt. Rainier National Park on the west; Norse Peak Wilderness lies to the north, Goat Rocks Wilderness to the south. Approximately 25 miles (40 km) of the Pacific Crest Trail travel along the Cascade Range crest within its boundaries. It contains scattered peaks, sharp ridges, steep slopes and hundreds of small lakes and potholes. Much of the wilderness is drained by tributaries of the Naches River.

Yakima County, Washington

Yakima County is a county in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, its population was 243,231. The county seat and largest city is Yakima. The county was formed out of Ferguson County in January 1865 and is named for the Yakama tribe of Native Americans.

Yakima County comprises the Yakima, WA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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