Gmina

The gmina (Polish pronunciation [ˈɡmina], plural gminy [ˈɡminɨ], from German Gemeinde meaning commune) is the principal unit of the administrative division of Poland, similar to a municipality. As of 2010 there were 2,478 gminy throughout the country.[1]

The gmina has been the basic unit of territorial division in Poland since 1974, when it replaced the smaller gromada (cluster). There are three types of gminy:

  1. urban gmina (Polish: gmina miejska) consisting of just one city or town,
  2. mixed urban-rural gmina (Polish: gmina miejsko-wiejska) consisting of a town and surrounding villages and countryside; and
  3. rural gmina (Polish: gmina wiejska) consisting only of villages and countryside (occasionally of just one village).

Some rural gminy have their seat in a town which is outside the gmina's division. For example, the rural Gmina Augustów is administered from the town of Augustów, but does not include the town, as Augustów is an urban type gmina in its own right.

The legislative and controlling body of each gmina is the elected municipal council (rada gminy), or in a town: rada miasta (town assembly). Executive power is held by the directly elected mayor of the municipality, called wójt in rural gminy, burmistrz in most urban and urban-rural gminy, or prezydent in towns with more than 400,000 inhabitants and some others which traditionally use the title. A gmina may create auxiliary units (jednostki pomocnicze), which play a subordinate administrative role. In rural areas these are called sołectwa, in towns they may be dzielnice or osiedla and in an urban-rural gmina, the town itself may be designated as an auxiliary unit. For a complete listing of all the gminy in Poland, see List of Polish gminas.

Poland - gminas
Division of Poland into gminy

Types of administrative tasks and objectives

Each gmina carries out two types of tasks: its own tasks and commissioned ones. Own tasks are public tasks exercised by self-government, which serve to satisfy the needs of the community. The tasks can be twofold:

  • compulsory – where the municipality cannot decline to carry out the tasks, and must set up a budget to carry them out in order to provide the inhabitants with the basic public benefits
  • optional – where the municipality can carry them out in accordance with available budgetary means, set out only to specific local needs (on the gmina's own responsibility and budget).

Own objectives

Own high objectives include matters such as spatial harmony, real estate management, environmental protection and nature conservation, water management, country roads, public streets, bridges, squares and traffic systems, water supply systems and source, the sewage system, removal of urban waste, water treatment, maintenance of cleanliness and order, sanitary facilities, dumps and council waste, supply of electric and thermal energy and gas, public transport, health care, welfare, care homes, subsidised housing, public education, cultural facilities including public libraries and other cultural institutions, historic monuments conservation and protection, the sports facilities and tourism including recreational grounds and devices, marketplaces and covered markets, green spaces and public parks, communal graveyards, public order and safety, fire and flood protection with equipment maintenance and storage, maintaining objects and devices of the public utility and administrative buildings, pro-family policy including social support for pregnant women, medical and legal care, supporting and popularising the self-government initiatives and cooperation within the commune including with non-governmental organizations, interaction with regional communities from other countries, etc.

Commissioned tasks

Commissioned tasks cover the remaining public tasks resulting from legitimate needs of the state, commissioned by central government for the units of local government to implement. The tasks are handed over on the basis of statutory by-laws, charters and regulations, or by way of agreements between the self-government units and central-government administration.

Overall number of gminy by type

Number of gminy by voivodeship
Voivodeship LS KP LBL LBS ŁD LP MS OP SK PD PM SL ŚWK WM GP WP Poland
Urban gminy 36 17 20 9 18 15 35 3 16 13 25 49 5 16 19 11 307
Urban-rural gminy 55 35 22 33 25 43 50 32 31 24 17 22 26 33 90 52 588
Rural gminy 78 92 171 41 134 124 229 36 113 81 81 96 71 67 117 51 1,584
Total gminy 169 144 213 83 177 182 314 71 160 118 123 167 102 116 226 114 2,479
of which: rural gminy with their seat outside the gmina 14 13 17 5 15 9 15 0 12 12 13 0 1 15 11 8 160

Abbreviations used for voivodeships:
LS: Lower Silesian Voivodeship, KP: Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, LBL: Lublin Voivodeship, LBS: Lubusz Voivodeship,
ŁD: Łódź Voivodeship, LP: Lesser Poland Voivodeship, MS: Masovian Voivodeship, OP: Opole Voivodeship,
SK: Subcarpathian Voivodeship, PD: Podlaskie Voivodeship, PM: Pomeranian Voivodeship, SL: Silesian Voivodeship,
ŚWK: Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, WM: Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, GP: Greater Poland Voivodeship, WP: West Pomeranian Voivodeship.

Largest and smallest gminy

LARGEST Population (2006 estimate) Land area in km² Population density
per km²
Urban Warsaw (1,697,596) Warsaw (517.22) Świętochłowice (4,156.80)
Rural Gmina Chełmiec (24,344) Gmina Wałcz (574.89) Gmina Buczkowice (542.70)
Urban-rural Gmina Piaseczno (61,525) Gmina Pisz (633.69) Gmina Wołomin (801.69)
Town in urban-rural gmina Gmina Nysa: Nysa (47,545) Gmina Szczytna: Szczytna (80.38) Gmina Swarzędz: Swarzędz (3,469.23)
Rural part of urban-rural gmina Gmina Wieliczka: rural part (28,864) Gmina Pisz: rural part (623.61) Gmina Świątniki Górne: rural part (407.86)
SMALLEST Population (2006 estimate) Land area in km² Population density
per km²
Urban Krynica Morska (1,364) Górowo Iławeckie (3.32) Krynica Morska (11.74)
Rural Gmina Cisna (1,663) Gmina Jejkowice (7.59) Gmina Lutowiska (4.63)
Urban-rural Gmina Nowe Warpno (1,559) Gmina Świątniki Górne (20.35) Gmina Nowe Warpno (7.88)
Town in urban-rural gmina Gmina Wyśmierzyce: Wyśmierzyce (892) Gmina Stawiszyn: Stawiszyn (0.99) Gmina Suraż: Suraż (28.94)
Rural part of urban-rural gmina Gmina Nowe Warpno: rural part (363) Gmina Suchedniów: rural part (15.54) Gmina Nowe Warpno: rural part (2.09)

References

  1. ^ Central Statistical Office of Poland Archived 2007-07-11 at the Wayback Machine, January 1, 2006. ‹See Tfd›(in Polish)
Białystok County

Białystok County (Polish: powiat białostocki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Podlaskie Voivodeship, north-eastern Poland, on the border with Belarus. It was created on 1 January 1999 as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Białystok, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains nine towns: Łapy, 25 km (16 mi) south-west of Białystok, Czarna Białostocka, 22 km (14 mi) north of Białystok, Wasilków, 11 km (7 mi) north of Białystok, Choroszcz, 13 km (8 mi) west of Białystok, Supraśl, 16 km (10 mi) north-east of Białystok, Michałowo, 13 km (8 mi) east of Białystok, Zabłudów, 16 km (10 mi) south-east of Białystok, Tykocin, 29 km (18 mi) west of Białystok, and Suraż, 23 km (14 mi) south-west of Białystok.

The county covers an area of 2,984.64 square kilometres (1,152.4 sq mi), making it the largest county in Poland (ahead of Olsztyn County). As of 2006 its total population is 136,797, out of which the population of Łapy is 16,583, that of Czarna Białostocka is 9,596, that of Wasilków is 8,967, that of Choroszcz is 5,416, that of Supraśl is 4,578, that of Michałowo is 3,343, that of Zabłudów is 2,400, that of Tykocin is 1,893, that of Suraż is 982, and the rural population is 83,039.

Chełm County

Chełm County (Polish: powiat chełmski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Lublin Voivodeship, eastern Poland, on the border with Ukraine. It was established on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Chełm, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only town in Chełm County is Rejowiec Fabryczny, which lies 17 km (11 mi) west of Chełm.

The county covers an area of 1,779.64 square kilometres (687.1 sq mi). As of 2006, its total population is 79,991, out of which the population of Rejowiec Fabryczny is 4,533 and the rural population is 75,458.

The emblem and flag of Chełm county was designed by Dr. Krzysztof Skupieński, a history teacher. The emblem harkens back to the old emblem of historical Chełm, which itself recounts the traditional folk tale of Głupi Redaktorski the great northern bear. Głupi can be seen, coated in silver, as she travels across the green fields of Chełm and its mythical golden oaks.The county includes part of the protected area called Chełm Landscape Park.

Grójec County

Grójec County (Polish: powiat grójecki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Grójec, which lies 40 kilometres (25 mi) south of Warsaw. The county contains three other towns: Warka, 25 km (16 mi) east of Grójec, Nowe Miasto nad Pilicą, 34 km (21 mi) south-west of Grójec, and Mogielnica, 22 km (14 mi) south-west of Grójec.

The county covers an area of 1,268.82 square kilometres (489.9 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 96,489, out of which the population of Grójec is 14,990, that of Warka is 11,028, that of Nowe Miasto nad Pilicą is 3,832, that of Mogielnica is 2,461, and the rural population is 64,178.

Kalisz County

Kalisz County (Polish: powiat kaliski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Greater Poland Voivodeship, west-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Kalisz, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only town in Kalisz County is Stawiszyn, which lies 18 km (11 mi) north of Kalisz.

The county covers an area of 1,160.02 square kilometres (447.9 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 80,369, out of which the population of Stawiszyn is 1,554 and the rural population is 78,815.

Kashubia

Kashubia or Cassubia (Kashubian: Kaszëbë, Polish: Kaszuby, German: Kaschubei, Kaschubien) is a language area in the historic Eastern Pomerania (Pomerelia) region of northwestern Poland. It is defined by the widespread use of the Kashubian language.

Located west of Gdańsk (inclusive of all but the easternmost district) and the mouth of the Vistula river, it is inhabited by members of the Kashubian ethnic group. The region is home to the Kashubian Lake District. According to the 1999 basic study Geografia współczesnych Kaszub (Geography of present-day Kashubia) by the Gdańsk scholar Jan Mordawski 43 municipalities (gminas) of the Pomeranian Voivodeship have a Kashubian share of at least one third of the total population:

Cities:Gdynia (Gdiniô)

Bytów County (Bëtowsczi kréz): Town of Bytów (Bëtowò) with Gmina Bytów, Gmina Czarna Dąbrówka (Czôrnô Dãbrówka), Gmina Lipnica (Lëpnica), Gmina Parchowo (Parchòwò), Gmina Tuchomie (Tëchòmié)

Chojnice County (Chònicczi kréz): Town of Brusy (Brusë) with Gmina Brusy, Gmina Chojnice (Chojnice), Gmina Konarzyny (Kònarzënë)

Człuchów County (Człëchòwsczi kréz): Gmina Przechlewo (Przechlewò)

Lębork County (Lãbòrsczi kréz): Gmina Cewice (Céwice)

Kartuzy County (Kartësczi kréz): Town of Kartuzy (Kartuzë) with Gmina Kartuzy, Town of Żukowo (Żukòwò) with Gmina Żukowo, Gmina Chmielno (Chmielno), Gmina Przodkowo (Przedkòwò), Gmina Sulęczyno (Sëlëczëno), Gmina Sierakowice (Sërakòjce), Gmina Somonino (Somònino), Gmina Stężyca (Stãżëca)

Kościerzyna County (Kòscérsczi kréz): Town of Kościerzyna (Kòscérzëna) with Gmina Kościerzyna, Gmina Dziemiany (Dzemiónë), Gmina Karsin (Kôrsëno), Gmina Lipusz (Lëpùsz), Gmina Nowa Karczma (Nowô Karczma)

Puck County (Pùcczi kréz): Town of Puck (Pùck) with Gmina Puck, towns of Hel (Hél), Jastarnia (Jastarniô) and Władysławowo (Wiôlgô Wies), Gmina Kosakowo (Kòsôkòwò), Gmina Krokowa (Krokòwa)

Wejherowo County (Wejrowsczi kréz): Town of Wejherowo (Wejrowò) and Gmina Wejherowo, towns of Reda (Réda) and Rumia (Rëmiô), Gmina Choczewo (Chòczewò), Gmina Gniewino (Gniewino), Gmina Linia (Lëniô), Gmina Luzino (Lëzëno), Gmina Łęczyce (Łãczëce), Gmina Szemud (Szëmôłd)

Kielce County

Kielce County (Polish: powiat kielecki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, south-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Kielce, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains five towns: Chęciny, 14 km (9 mi) south-west of Kielce, Chmielnik, 32 km (20 mi) south of Kielce, Daleszyce, 17 km (11 mi) south-east of Kielce, Bodzentyn, 25 km (16 mi) east of Kielce, Morawica, 13,7 km (8,5 mi) south of Kielce.

The county covers an area of 2,247.45 square kilometres (867.7 sq mi). As of 2016 its total population is 208 798, out of which the population of Chęciny is 4 421, that of Chmielnik is 3 834, that of Daleszyce is 2 913, that of Bodzentyn is 2 247, and the rural population is 195 383.

Konin County

Konin County (Polish: powiat koniński) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Greater Poland Voivodeship, west-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Konin, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains five towns: Golina, 12 km (7 mi) north-west of Konin, Kleczew, 19 km (12 mi) north of Konin, Sompolno, 27 km (17 mi) north-east of Konin, Ślesin, 17 km (11 mi) north of Konin, and Rychwał, 18 km (11 mi) south of Konin.

The county covers an area of 1,578.71 square kilometres (609.5 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 123,646, out of which the population of Golina is 4,330, that of Kleczew is 4,173, that of Sompolno is 3,695, that of Ślesin is 3,102, that of Rychwał is 2,377, and the rural population is 105,969.

Kutno County

Kutno County (Polish: powiat kutnowski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Łódź Voivodeship, central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Kutno, which lies 51 kilometres (32 mi) north of the regional capital Łódź. The county also contains the towns of Żychlin, lying 18 km (11 mi) east of Kutno, and Krośniewice, 14 km (9 mi) west of Kutno.

The county covers an area of 886.29 square kilometres (342.2 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 104,124, out of which the population of Kutno is 47,557, that of Żychlin is 8,880, that of Krośniewice is 4,647, and the rural population is 43,040.

Lublin County

Lublin County (Polish: powiat lubelski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Lublin Voivodeship, eastern Poland. It was established on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Lublin, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only towns in Lublin County are Bełżyce, which lies 23 km (14 mi) west of Lublin, and Bychawa, 26 km (16 mi) south of Lublin.

The county covers an area of 1,679.42 square kilometres (648.4 sq mi). As of 2006, its total population is 140,562, out of which the population of Bełżyce is 7,054, that of Bychawa is 5,285, and the rural population is 128,223.

Olsztyn County

Olsztyn County (Polish: powiat olsztyński) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, northern Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Olsztyn, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The owners are the Olstynskis'.The county contains five towns: Dobre Miasto, 24 km (15 mi) north of Olsztyn, Biskupiec, 31 km (19 mi) east of Olsztyn, Olsztynek, 27 km (17 mi) south-west of Olsztyn, Barczewo, 14 km (9 mi) north-east of Olsztyn, and Jeziorany, 26 km (16 mi) north-east of Olsztyn.

The county covers an area of 2,840.29 square kilometres (1,096.6 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 113,529, out of which the population of Dobre Miasto is 10,489, that of Biskupiec is 10,348, that of Olsztynek is 7,591, that of Barczewo is 7,401, that of Jeziorany is 3,376, and the rural population is 74,324.

Ostrołęka County

Ostrołęka County (Polish: powiat ostrołęcki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Ostrołęka, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only town in Ostrołęka County is Myszyniec, which lies 38 km (24 mi) north of Ostrołęka.

The county covers an area of 2,099.32 square kilometres (810.6 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 84,344, out of which the population of Myszyniec is 3,014 and the rural population is 81,330.

Poznań County

Poznań County (Polish: powiat poznański) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Greater Poland Voivodeship, west-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Poznań, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county's administrative offices (starostwo powiatowe) are in the Jeżyce neighbourhood of Poznań.

Poznań County contains 10 towns: Swarzędz, 11 km (7 mi) east of (central) Poznań, Luboń, 8 km (5 mi) south of Poznań, Mosina, 18 km (11 mi) south of Poznań, Murowana Goślina, 20 km (12 mi) north of Poznań, Puszczykowo, 14 km (9 mi) south of Poznań, Kostrzyn, 21 km (13 mi) east of Poznań, Pobiedziska, 27 km (17 mi) north-east of Poznań, Kórnik, 22 km (14 mi) south-east of Poznań, Buk, 28 km (17 mi) west of Poznań, and Stęszew, 21 km (13 mi) south-west of Poznań.

The county covers an area of 1,899.61 square kilometres (733.4 sq mi). As of 2012 its total population is 341.357, out of which the urban population is 132,048 (Swarzędz 29,894, Luboń 26,935, Mosina 12,150, Murowana Goślina 10,140, Puszczykowo 9,311, Kostrzyn 8,539, Pobiedziska 8,329, Kórnik 6,981, Buk 6,181, Stęszew 5,339), and the rural population is 209,309.

Płock County

Płock County (Polish: powiat płocki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Płock, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains three towns: Gąbin, 17 km (11 mi) south of Płock, Drobin, 29 km (18 mi) north-east of Płock, and Wyszogród, 39 km (24 mi) south-east of Płock.

The county covers an area of 1,798.71 square kilometres (694.5 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 106,455, out of which the population of Gąbin is 4,137, that of Drobin is 2,980, that of Wyszogród is 2,772, and the rural population is 96,566.

Płońsk County

Płońsk County (Polish: powiat płoński) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Płońsk, which lies 63 kilometres (39 mi) north-west of Warsaw. The only other town in the county is Raciąż, lying 25 km (16 mi) north-west of Płońsk.

The county covers an area of 1,383.67 square kilometres (534.2 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 87,430, out of which the population of Płońsk is 22,233, that of Raciąż is 4,752, and the rural population is 60,445.

Siedlce County

Siedlce County (Polish: powiat siedlecki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Siedlce, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only town in Siedlce County is Mordy, which lies 18 km (11 mi) east of Siedlce.

The county covers an area of 1,603.22 square kilometres (619.0 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 80,560, out of which the population of Mordy is 1,840 and the rural population is 78,720.

Sokółka County

Sokółka County (Polish: powiat sokólski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Podlaskie Voivodeship, north-eastern Poland, on the border with Belarus. It was created on 1 January 1999 as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Sokółka, which lies 39 kilometres (24 mi) north-east of the regional capital Białystok. The county also contains the towns of Dąbrowa Białostocka, lying 30 km (19 mi) north of Sokółka, Krynki, lying 24 km (15 mi) south-east of Sokółka, and Suchowola, 33 km (21 mi) north-west of Sokółka.

The county covers an area of 2,054.42 square kilometres (793.2 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 72,424, out of which the population of Sokółka is 18,888, that of Dąbrowa Białostocka is 6,147, that of Krynki is 2,709, that of Suchowola is 2,243, and the rural population is 42,437.

Wysokie Mazowieckie County

Wysokie Mazowieckie County (Polish: powiat wysokomazowiecki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Podlaskie Voivodeship, north-eastern Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Wysokie Mazowieckie, which lies 49 kilometres (30 mi) south-west of the regional capital Białystok. The only other towns in the county are Ciechanowiec, lying 27 km (17 mi) south of Wysokie, Szepietowo, 6 km (4 mi) south of Wysokie, and as from 1 January 2011 Czyżew.

The county covers an area of 1,288.49 square kilometres (497.5 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population was 59,719, out of which the population of Wysokie Mazowieckie was 9,257, that of Ciechanowiec 4,898, and the rural population 45,564 (including approximately 2,400 for the population of Szepietowo, which became a town in 2010).

Włocławek County

Włocławek County (Polish: powiat włocławski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, north-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Włocławek, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains six towns: Brześć Kujawski, which lies 12 km (7 mi) south-west of Włocławek, Kowal, which lies 15 km (9 mi) south-east of Włocławek, Lubraniec, which lies 19 km (12 mi) south-west of Włocławek, Izbica Kujawska, which lies 33 km (21 mi) south-west of Włocławek, Chodecz, which lies 28 km (17 mi) south of Włocławek, and Lubień Kujawski, 29 km (18 mi) south of Włocławek.

The county covers an area of 1,472.34 square kilometres (568.5 sq mi). As of 2006 its total population is 85,339, out of which the population of Brześć Kujawski is 4,522, that of Kowal is 3,484, that of Lubraniec is 3,207, that of Izbica Kujawska is 2,783, that of Chodecz is 1,936, that of Lubień Kujawski is 1,299, and the rural population is 68,108.

Zamość County

Zamość County (Polish: powiat zamojski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Lublin Voivodeship, eastern Poland. It was established on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Zamość, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The county contains three towns: Szczebrzeszyn, which lies 21 km (13 mi) west of Zamość, Zwierzyniec, which lies 24 km (15 mi) south-west of Zamość, and Krasnobród, 22 km (14 mi) south of Zamość.

The county covers an area of 1,872.27 square kilometres (722.9 sq mi). As of 2006, its total population is 110,225, including a population of 5,299 in Szczebrzeszyn, 3,344 in Zwierzyniec, 3,047 in Krasnobród, and a rural population of 98,535.

Current
Historical
See also
Current
Historical
Designations for types of administrative territorial entities

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.