Glyndŵr's Way

Glyndŵr's Way (Welsh: Llwybr Glyndŵr) is a long distance footpath in mid Wales. It runs for 135 miles (217 km) in an extended loop through Powys between Knighton and Welshpool.

Glyndŵr's Way
Welshpool Town Hall
Welshpool is one of the trail heads
Length135 mi (217 km)
LocationWales
DesignationNational Trail
TrailheadsKnighton, Powys
Welshpool
UseHiking

History

Glyndŵr's Way was granted National Trail status in 2000 to mark the beginning of the third millennium and the 600th anniversary of an ill-fated but nevertheless long-running rebellion in 1400. Its name derives from the early 15th century Welsh prince and folk hero Owain Glyndŵr.

Route

The footpath officially begins in Knighton, on the English border, where it links with Offa's Dyke Path. Running in roughly a horseshoe shape, it passes small market towns such as Llanidloes and quiet villages including Abbeycwmhir and Llanbadarn Fynydd, traversing central Mid Wales to Machynlleth near the Dyfi estuary and returning across Wales via Llanbrynmair, Llangadfan and Lake Vyrnwy and the valley of the River Vyrnwy to Welshpool 4 miles (6.4 km) from the Wales–England border.

Some walkers complete it start to finish in about 10 days, some complete it in sections over various weekends, and some just walk the section that appeals to them. The route is varied, is often challenging, and should not be attempted without preparation. Accommodation can be booked all along the route at hotels, guest houses or campsites.

See also

External links

Coordinates: 52°37′33″N 3°43′49″W / 52.6259°N 3.7303°W

A4059 road

The A4059 road is a single-carriageway north-south road that runs between the A470 at Brecon Beacons National Park and the A470 at Abercynon.

A4113 road

The A4113 road is a single-carriageway road that runs from Knighton in Powys to Bromfield in Shropshire, United Kingdom, passing through north Herefordshire.

From Knighton (and the A488) it heads east along the southern side of the Teme valley (heading downstream), crossing the Wales — England border into Herefordshire, then across the River Teme via Leintwardine Bridge (at 119 metres (390 ft) above sea level). The route then follows a Roman Road north through the Roman village of Leintwardine, leaving the Teme behind.

From Leintwardine the route heads rapidly up into the Leintwardine hills, passing at 242 metres (794 ft) above sea level, before descending into Shropshire and terminating at Bromfield (A49), 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of Ludlow, at an elevation of 91 metres (299 ft) and also returning close to the River Teme. In total the A4113 is 14.0 miles (22.5 km) in length.

A4221 road

The A4221 is an A road which links Banwen with Abercraf in Wales.

The roads begins just south of Abercraf at the junction with the A4067. It then heads eastwards through Caehopkin and then bypasses Coelbren. It joins the A4109 just west of Banwen.

A458 road

The A458 is a route on the UK highway network that runs from Mallwyd, near Machynlleth, in Wales, to Halesowen, near Stourbridge, in England. On the way it passes through Welshpool, Shrewsbury, Much Wenlock, Bridgnorth and Stourbridge.

A479 road

The A479, officially also known as the Glanusk Park (Crickhowell)—Llyswen Trunk Road, is a trunk road in Wales, starting from Glanusk Park near Crickhowell running roughly in a northerly direction to Llyswen, where it joins the A470 road. It runs entirely within the county of Powys and is a single carriageway throughout its length.

A489 road

The A489, officially known as the Newtown to Machynlleth Trunk Road in Wales, is a trunk road in the United Kingdom running from Craven Arms, Shropshire to Machynlleth, Powys and crossing the Wales-England border.

The road starts about one mile north of Craven Arms. From here it travels through Lydham, Churchstoke, Newtown, Caersws, Cemmaes Road and Machynlleth.

Between Caersws and Cemmaes Road, the road appears to 'disappear', where it is travelling with the A470, which takes priority. The same happens in Lydham, albeit for a much shorter distance, where the A488 takes priority.

A490 road

The A490 is a road in the United Kingdom running from Churchstoke, Powys to Llanfyllin, also in Powys. The road runs for a short distance through Shropshire in England.

Abbeycwmhir

Abbeycwmhir or Abbey Cwmhir (Welsh: Abaty Cwm Hir, "Abbey in the Long Valley") is a village and community. in the valley of the Nant Clywedog in Radnorshire, Powys, Wales.

Castle Caereinion railway station

Castle Caereinion railway station is a railway station on the narrow gauge Welshpool and Llanfair Light Railway in Mid Wales. It serves the tiny village of Castle Caereinion.

Cyfronydd railway station

Cyfronydd railway station is a railway halt on the narrow gauge Welshpool and Llanfair Light Railway in Mid Wales. This is where trains pass each other when a two train service is operating. Passengers are able to alight and photograph the other locomotive.

Cyfronydd Hall, where former Foreign Secretary William Hague lives, is nearby.

Dyfi Valley Way

The Dyfi Valley Way is a long distance footpath in Mid Wales.

Dylife Gorge

The Dylife Gorge, located near Dylife, Powys, Mid Wales, was carved by the action (and aftermath) of the last Ice age. It is headed by the Ffrwd Fawr Waterfall.

Before the last Ice age, the River Twymyn did not flow through the valley. When the valley was filled by a glacier, the ice ground out a U-shaped glaciated valley. When the glacier that filled the valley melted the Twymyn started to run down the wide channel left behind and the fast flowing river further eroded the valley, cutting the V-shaped gorge as seen today.The long-distance footpath Glyndŵr's Way (Welsh: Llwybr Glyndŵr) passes nearby.

Heniarth railway station

Heniarth railway station is an unstaffed halt on the narrow gauge Welshpool and Llanfair Light Railway serving the hamlet of Heniarth. This station is a request halt. Alighting passengers are required to step down onto the grass as there is no platform. The railway crosses the River Banwy Bridge 200 yards to the east of the halt.

Llanfair Caereinion railway station

Llanfair Caereinion railway station located in Llanfair Caereinion is the Western terminus of the narrow gauge Welshpool and Llanfair Light Railway. The locomotive running shed and workshop are located here, along with a Tea Room and gift shop.

National Trails

National Trails are long distance footpaths and bridleways in England and Wales. They are administered by Natural England, a statutory agency of the UK government, and Natural Resources Wales (successor body to the Countryside Council for Wales), a Welsh Government-sponsored body.

National Trails are marked with an acorn symbol along the route.

In Scotland, the equivalent trails are called Scotland's Great Trails and are administered by Scottish Natural Heritage.

Offa's Dyke Path

Offa's Dyke Path (Welsh: Llwybr Clawdd Offa) is a long-distance footpath following closely the Wales–England border. Opened in 1971, it is one of Britain's National Trails and draws walkers from throughout the world. Some of the 177-mile (285 km) route either follows, or keeps close company with, the remnants of Offa's Dyke, an earthwork, most of which was probably constructed in the late 8th century on the orders of Offa of Mercia.

Staylittle

Staylittle (Welsh: Penffordd-las), sometimes referred to colloquially as Y Stay or Y Stae, is a small village set in the shallow upland basin of the Afon Clywedog on the B4518 road, equidistant from Llanidloes and Llanbrynmair in the historic county of Montgomeryshire, Wales, although currently administered as part of the unitary authority of Powys.

Sylfaen railway station

Sylfaen railway station, located in the tiny hamlet of Sylfaen on the A548, is an unstaffed request halt on the narrow gauge Welshpool and Llanfair Light Railway. It has a short platform and waiting shelter.

Usk Valley Walk

The Usk Valley Walk is a waymarked long distance footpath in south east Wales, from Caerleon to Brecon.

Wales Long-distance footpaths and National Trails in Wales
Coastal
Non-coastal
National Trails
(England and Wales)
Scotland's Great Trails
Long-distance path
(Northern Ireland)
Transport in Powys
Road
Footpaths
Cycle routes
Railway
stations

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