Glenn Ressler

Glenn Emanuel Ressler (born May 21, 1943) was a National Football League offensive lineman from 1965 through 1974. During that span he appeared in Super Bowl III and Super Bowl V for the Baltimore Colts. He played college football at Penn State University. In 2001, he was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame. He attended Mahanoy Joint High School in Herndon, PAST

Glenn Ressler
Born:May 21, 1943 (age 75)
Dornsife, Pennsylvania, United States
Career information
Position(s)OT/G
Height6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight247 lb (112 kg)
CollegePenn State
AFL draft1965 / Round: 3 / Pick: 17
Drafted byDenver Broncos[1]
NFL draft1965 / Round: 3 / Pick: 36
Career history
As player
19651974Baltimore Colts
Career highlights and awards
Career stats
Games played125
Games started62

References

  1. ^ "1965 AFL Draft". Archived from the original on February 25, 2017. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
1964 College Football All-America Team

The 1964 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1964. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1964 season are (1) the Associated Press (AP), (2) the United Press International (UPI), (3) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Central Press Association (CP), and (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). Other selectors include Time magazine, Football News, and The Sporting News.

AP, UPI, NEA, and Central Press were all press organizations that polled writers and players. FWAA was also a poll of writers, and the AFCA was a poll of college coaches. The Sporting News and Time magazine polled football scouts and coaches. AP, UPI, NEA, Central Press, and The Sporting News chose both first and second teams. AP, UPI, NEA, and Central Press also listed numerous honorable mentions.

1965 American Football League draft

The 1965 American Football League draft took place on November 28, 1964. Held via telephone conference call, it remains the only draft in major professional football history to be held without a central location. The NFL draft was held the same day.

1965 Baltimore Colts season

The 1965 Baltimore Colts season was the 13th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1965 season with a record of 10 wins, 3 losses, and 1 tie, tied for first in the Western Conference with the Green Bay Packers. Although the Packers won both regular season games over the Colts, no tiebreaking system was in place in 1965, and a playoff game was required to determine the Western Conference champion, who would host the Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Browns for the NFL title.

1965 NFL Draft

The 1965 National Football League draft was held at the Summit Hotel in New York City on Saturday, November 28, 1964. The first player selected was Tucker Frederickson, back from Auburn, by the New York Giants.The draft was marked by the failure of the St. Louis Cardinals to sign quarterback Joe Namath of Alabama, who went with the New York Jets of the American Football League. The AFL draft was held the same day.

1966 Baltimore Colts season

The 1966 Baltimore Colts season was the 14th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1966 season with a record of 9 wins and 5 losses and finished second in the Western Conference.

1967 Baltimore Colts season

The 1967 Baltimore Colts season was the 15th season for the team in the National Football League. They finished the regular season with a record of 11 wins, 1 loss, and 2 ties, the same record in the Western Conference's Coastal division with the Los Angeles Rams. However, the Colts lost the tiebreaker based on point differential in head-to-head games and thus did not make the playoffs.

The Colts' official winning percentage of .917 (based on the NFL's non-counting of ties for such purposes prior to 1972) is the best in North American professional sports history for a non-playoff-qualifying team.

1968 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1968 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1968 Baltimore Colts season

The 1968 Baltimore Colts season was the 16th season for the team in the National Football League. Led by sixth-year head coach Don Shula, they finished the regular season with a record of 13 wins and 1 loss, and won the Western Conference's Coastal division.

The previous season, the Colts' record was 11–1–2, tied for the best in the league, but were excluded from the playoffs. They lost a tiebreaker with the Los Angeles Rams for the Coastal Division title in 1967; the other three teams in the NFL postseason, all division winners, had nine wins each.

In 1968, Baltimore won the Western Conference playoff game with the Minnesota Vikings and the NFL Championship Game in a shutout of the Cleveland Browns, but then lost to the New York Jets of the American Football League in Super Bowl III. Hall of fame quarterback Johnny Unitas had been injured during the pre-season, so Earl Morrall led the offense. Shula decided to bring Unitas back in during the second half of the Super Bowl, to no avail.

1969 Baltimore Colts season

The 1969 Baltimore Colts season was the 17th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1969 season with a record of 8 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie. They finished second in the Western Conference's Coastal division.

Coach Don Shula was let go after the season, a disappointing one many attributed to the hangover of losing to the heavy-underdog Jets in the Super Bowl the year before. It is one of the first instances of a Super Bowl hangover – in which the team that played in a Super Bowl the previous season, underperforms the next season.

1970 Baltimore Colts season

The 1970 Baltimore Colts season was the 18th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1970 season with a record of 11 wins, 2 losses and 1 tie. They won the first AFC East title. The Colts finished their season in Miami with a Super Bowl victory over the Cowboys, their first Super Bowl title and 3rd world championship overall (1958, 1959, and 1970.) The Colts would not return to the Super Bowl again until the 2006 NFL season.

1971 Baltimore Colts season

The 1971 Baltimore Colts season was the 19th season for the team in the National Football League. The Colts appeared to be on the verge of winning the AFC East again after beating the Miami Dolphins 14-3 in the next-to-last game of the season. However, the Colts would drop the final game of the season to the New England Patriots, forcing them to settle for the Wild Card with a 10-4 record. They lost to the Dolphins in the AFC Championship game. The Baltimore defense gave up a total of 140 points for 14 regular season (10 PPG) & in their four defeats, they lost by 15 points total.

1972 Baltimore Colts season

The 1972 Baltimore Colts season was the 20th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1972 season with a record of 5 wins and 9 losses, and finished third in the AFC East. Carroll Rosenbloom and Robert Irsay, who had recently taken over the Los Angeles Rams, traded ownership of the two franchises, with players and coaching staffs remaining intact. However, the Colts were getting older and started 1-4 before Coach Don McCafferty was fired. The Colts would go 4-5 in their final nine games under John Sandusky to finish with a 5-9 record, their first losing mark in 16 years.

1973 Baltimore Colts season

The 1973 Baltimore Colts season was the 21st season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1973 season with a record of 4 wins and 10 losses, and finished tied for fourth in the AFC East with the New York Jets. The Colts lost the tiebreaker to the New York based on head-to-head series (0–2).

The Colts were the only team to lose to the Houston Oilers, bowing 31-27 in week eight at home. The Oilers broke an 18-game losing streak with the victory.

The 1973 season was the first year since 1955 in which long-time quarterback Johnny Unitas was not on the roster.

1974 Baltimore Colts season

The 1974 Baltimore Colts season was the 22nd season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League’s 1974 season with a record of 2 wins and 12 losses, and finished fifth in the AFC East.

Head coach Howard Schnellenberger was fired after three games, after an argument with owner Robert Irsay over whether Marty Domres or Bert Jones should start at quarterback for the Colts. General manager Joe Thomas took over the head coaching duties for the remainders of the season, but could direct the team to only two wins, both on the road, as the Colts failed to win a home game during the 1974 season. This would be the last time the Colts would fail to win a home game in a non-strike season until their abysmal 1–15 1991 season, when the team was based in Indianapolis.

List of Penn State Nittany Lions in the NFL draft

This is a list of Penn State Nittany Lions football players in the NFL Draft.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Penn State Nittany Lions football

The Penn State Nittany Lions team represents the Pennsylvania State University in college football. The Nittany Lions compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the Big Ten Conference, which they joined in 1993 after playing as an Independent from their founding through 1992.Established in 1887, the Nittany Lions have achieved numerous on-field successes, the most notable of which include two consensus national championships (1982 and 1986), four Big Ten Conference Championships (in 1994, 2005, 2008, and 2016), and 48 appearances in college bowl games, with a postseason bowl record of 29–17–2. The team is also #8 in all-time total wins, one game behind Oklahoma and Alabama. The Nittany Lions play their home games at Beaver Stadium, located on-campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. With an official seating capacity of 106,572, Beaver Stadium is the second-largest stadium in the western hemisphere, behind only Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The team is currently coached by James Franklin.

Ressler

Ressler is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Antony Ressler (born 1959), businessman

Christian Ressler (born 1991), footballer

Glenn Ressler (born 1943), footballer

Larry Ressler (1848–1918), baseballer

Norman W. Ressler (1873–1914), Medal of Honor recipient

Oliver Ressler (born 1970), artist

Robert Ressler (1937–2013), criminal profiler

Backfield
Line

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.