Giulia Gwinn

Giulia Ronja Gwinn (German pronunciation: [ɡvɪn]; born 2 July 1999) is a German footballer. She plays as a midfielder for FC Bayern Munich in the Bundesliga and the German national team.[2]

Giulia Gwinn
20160319 U17W GERSUI 9163
Gwinn during the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, March 2016
Personal information
Full name Giulia Ronja Gwinn[1]
Date of birth 2 July 1999 (age 20)
Place of birth Ailingen, Germany
Height 170 cm (5 ft 7 in)[1]
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Bayern Munich
Number 7
Youth career
TSG Ailingen
VfB Friedrichshafen
2009–2014 FV Ravensburg
2014–2015 SV Weingarten
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2015–2016 SC Freiburg II 6 (7)
2015–2019 SC Freiburg 68 (21)
2019– Bayern Munich 0 (0)
National team
2013 Germany U15 6 (2)
2014 Germany U16 3 (2)
2015–2016 Germany U17 26 (9)
2017 Germany U19 7 (5)
2017– Germany 13 (2)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 22 April 2019
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 18:29, 29 June 2019 (UTC)

Early life

Gwinn started playing football at the age of eight years for TSG Ailingen and later for VfB Friedrichshafen. In 2009, she began a five-year spell at FV Ravensburg.[3] She then played a season for the B-Juniors of SV Weingarten, as the only girl in the team.[4]

Club career

In 2015, Gwinn joined Bundesliga team SC Freiburg for the 2015–16 season at the age of 16 years.[3][5] She had initially agreed to sign for Freiburg in February 2015, rejecting competing offers from FC Bayern Munich and Turbine Potsdam.[6] On 13 September 2015 (3rd Round) she debuted in a 6–1 home win over 1. FC Köln. She substituted in for Sandra Starke, making her Bundesliga debut as a 16-year-old. A month later, on 11 October 2015 (5th Round), in the match against SV Werder Bremen, was her first time in the starting lineup. On 6 December 2015 (10th matchday) she scored in a 6–1 home win over Bayer Leverkusen.[7]

On 25 February 2019, Gwinn agreed terms with Bayern Munich which would see her leave Freiburg at the end of the 2018–19 season. [8]

International career

Youth

Gwinn has represented Germany on the under-15, under-16 and under-17 national teams. At the age of 13 years, she was called up by coach Bettina Wiegmann for under-15 national team training in November 2012.[9] She made her debut for the U-15 national team in April 2013,[10] a substitute in an 8–0 win over the Netherlands.[11] She made three appearances for the under-16 national team in 2014.[12] In 2015, she was the youngest player in the U-17 national team squad for the European Championship in Iceland where the team reached the semi-finals but were defeated 0–1 by the Swiss selection.[13] UEFA's technical report noted that Gwinn's pace on the right wing had been a positive feature of Germany's play.[14] In May 2016, the team won the 2016 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship after a penalty shootout against Spain in Belarus.[15] The four Freiburg players in the squad contributed seven of Germany's 10 goals at the tournament and two of them, including Gwinn, successfully converted their kicks in the shootout.[16]

At the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup in Jordan, Gwinn helped Germany beat Venezuela 2–1 in their opening match earning her the "Player of the Match" award.[17] She scored the first goal with a volley, then assisted on the second.[18] Entering the tournament with 23 Under-17 caps and as a first team player with Freiburg, Gwinn was considered one of the pillars of the team.[19] In the Germans' second match against Canada, Gwinn's direct free kick salvaged a 1–1 draw.[20] In the third match, Gwinn scored a goal in Germany's victory over Cameroon.[21]

She played in the 2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (scoring a goal against Scotland[22]) in Northern Ireland where she reached the semi-final and with this she qualified for the 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup (where scored a goal against China[23] and was named "Player of the Match" against Nigeria[24]).

Senior

On 14 May 2019 Gwinn was named to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup German squad.[25] In her FIFA Women's World Cup debut, she secured the win for Germany in their opening game of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup by scoring the only goal in a 1–0 group-stage victory over China. She was named "Player of the Match" for her contribution.[26] The German World Cup campaign ended in the quarterfinals after a 2-1 loss to Sweden. Gwinn was later awarded with the Best Young Player Award for her performance at the tournament.[27]

International goals

Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first:

Gwinn – goals for Germany
# Date Location Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 10 November 2018 Osnabrück, Germany  Italy 3–2 5–2 Friendly
2. 8 June 2019 Rennes, France  China PR 1–0 1–0 2019 FIFA World Cup

Source:[28]

Personal life

She is the youngest of four siblings.[17]

Honours

International

Germany

Individual

References

  1. ^ a b "List of Players – Germany" (PDF). FIFA. 2 October 2016. p. 5. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  2. ^ "FC Bayern verpflichtet Nationalspielerin Giulia Gwinn". Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Giulia Gwinn Interview" (in German). SC Freiburg. Retrieved 14 September 2015.
  4. ^ Dedeleit, Jochen (18 March 2015). "Gwinn und Minge stehen vor EM-Quali". FuPa.net (in German). Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  5. ^ "SC contracts Giulia Gwinn and Janina Minge" (in German). SC Freiburg. Retrieved 14 September 2015.
  6. ^ "Giulia Gwinn wechselt zum SC Freiburg" (in German). Schwäbische Zeitung. 23 February 2015. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  7. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle" (in German). German Football Association. 6 December 2015. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  8. ^ "FC Bayern verpflichtet Nationalspielerin Giulia Gwinn". Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Giulia Gwinn ist nominiert" (in German). Südkurier. 9 November 2012. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  10. ^ "Janine Minge und Giulia Gwinn erstellen Strafenkatalog" (in German). Schwäbische Zeitung. 15 November 2013. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  11. ^ Dedeleit, Jochen. "Giulia Gwinn bleibt international im Rennen". www.fv-ravensburg.de (in German). FV Ravensburg. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  12. ^ Dedeleit, Jochen (17 November 2014). "Gwinn und Minge machen auf sich aufmerksam". FuPa.net (in German). Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  13. ^ "Swiss knock out Germany to make first final". Uefa.com. UEFA. 1 July 2015. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  14. ^ "Team Analysis – Germany". UEFA. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  15. ^ "Germany's European title dream comes true". FIFA.com.
  16. ^ Hennig, Sandra (2 June 2016). "Starke Talente des SC Freiburg: Quartett im Team des U17-Europameisters" (in German). Badische Zeitung. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  17. ^ a b "Gwinn: Germany's wunderkind shining in Jordan". Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  18. ^ Bach, Tobias (30 September 2016). "U17 WM: Deutschland gewinnt zum Auftakt Dank Giulia Gwinn und Klara Bühl" (in German). Eurosport. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  19. ^ Tschek, Michael (28 September 2016). "Fußballerin aus Ailingen will hoch hinaus" (in German). Schwäbische Zeitung. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  20. ^ "Canada ties Germany at U17 Women's World Cup". CBC Sports. 3 October 2016. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  21. ^ Germany moves confidently into the quarterfinals
  22. ^ Scotland 0 – 3 Germany
  23. ^ Germany 2 – 0 China
  24. ^ "Player of the Match" Winners in U20
  25. ^ "Voss-Tecklenburg beruft WM-Kader" [Voss-Tecklenburg appoints World Cup squad] (in German). DFB. Retrieved 14 May 2019.
  26. ^ "Giulia Gwinn is the official Player of the Match!". DFB's official Twitter handle. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  27. ^ "Gwinn awarded FIFA Young Player Award". DFB. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  28. ^ "Players Info Gwinn Goals". DFB. Retrieved 3 February 2014.

External links

2015 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship was the eighth edition of the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, the annual European youth football competition contested by the women's under-17 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Iceland hosted the tournament. Players born on or after 1 January 1998 were eligible to participate in this competition.

Each match lasted 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes, with an interval of 15 minutes.

2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the fifth edition of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-17 national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament was held in Jordan from 30 September to 21 October 2016.While the role of women in sport was regarded as controversial due to cultural and religious conservatism in some countries of the Middle East, this tournament was the first female FIFA tournament held in the region.

2016 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship

The 2016 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship was the 9th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, the annual European international youth football championship contested by the women's under-17 national teams of UEFA member associations. Belarus, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, hosted the tournament between 4 and 16 May 2016.A total of eight teams played in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 1999 eligible to participate. Each match had a duration of 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes with a 15-minute half-time.

Same as previous editions held in even-numbered years, the tournament acted as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. The top three teams of the tournament qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup in Jordan as the UEFA representatives.

2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (also known as UEFA Women's Under-19 Euro 2017) was the 16th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (20th edition if the Under-18 era is included), the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Northern Ireland was selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015 as the host country for the tournament.A total of eight teams played in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 1998 eligible to participate.

Same as previous editions held in odd-numbered years, the tournament acts as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. The top four teams of the tournament qualified for the 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in France as the UEFA representatives, besides France who qualified automatically as hosts.

2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was the ninth edition of the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA, since its inception in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship (age limit was raised from 19 to 20 in 2006).

The tournament was held in Brittany, France between 5 and 24 August 2018, who would also host the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Haiti and the Netherlands made their U-20 Women's World Cup debuts. North Korea were the defending champions but were eliminated by host France in the quarter-finals.

The final took place at Stade de la Rabine, Vannes between Spain and Japan, a rematch from the group stage. Japan won their first title, beating Spain 3–1 in the Final.

2018–19 DFB-Pokal Frauen

The 2018–19 DFB-Pokal was the 39th season of the annual German football cup competition. Fifty teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Frauen-Bundesliga and the 2. Frauen-Bundesliga, excluding second teams. The competition began on 11 August 2018 with the first of six rounds and ended on 1 May 2019 with the final at the RheinEnergieStadion in Cologne, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 2010. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German women's football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions were Frauen-Bundesliga side VfL Wolfsburg, after they defeated Bayern Munich 3–2 on penalties in the previous final.They successfully defended their title after a 1–0 victoy over SC Freiburg.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B

Group B of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 8 to 17 June 2019. The group consisted of China PR, Germany, South Africa and Spain. The top two teams, Germany and Spain, along with the third-placed team, China PR (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

FC Bayern Munich (women)

FC Bayern Munich Women is a German football club based in Munich, Bavaria. It currently plays in the Frauen-Bundesliga, the top women's league in Germany.

FIFA Women's World Cup awards

At the end of each FIFA Women's World Cup final tournament, several awards are presented to the players and teams which have distinguished themselves in various aspects of the game.

Friedrichshafen

Friedrichshafen (German pronunciation: [fʁiːdʁiksˈhafn̩]) is an industrial city on the northern shoreline of Lake Constance (the Bodensee) in Southern Germany, near the borders of both Switzerland and Austria. It is the district capital (Kreisstadt) of the Bodensee district in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg. Friedrichshafen has a population of about 58,000.

Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Germany women's national football team has represented Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have won the title twice and were runners-up once. They also reached the fourth place in 1991 and in 2015.

*Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

**Gold background colour indicates that the tournament was won.

***Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Germany women's national under-17 football team

The Germany women's national under-17 football team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft (U-17-Juniorinnen)) represents Germany in international women's association football and is governed by the German Football Association (DFB). The national team was founded in 1992 as U-16 national team. Since the summer of 2001, the age limit is 17. The coach is Anouschka Bernhard.

Germany women's national under-19 football team

The Germany women's national under-19 football team represents the female under-19s of Germany in the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, and is controlled by the German Football Association.

Germany women's national under-20 football team

The Germany women's national under-20 football team represents the female under-20s of Germany in the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, and is controlled by the German Football Association.

Germany women's national youth football team

This article includes current squads of Germany U-23, U-20, U-19, U-17, U-16 and U-15 national football teams.

Gwinn

Gwinn is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Curtis Gwinn, writer

Don Gwinn (1902–1961), American track and field athlete

John Gwinn III (1791–1849), United States Navy officer

Giulia Gwinn, German footballer

Lambert Estes Gwinn (1884–1958), Tennessee attorney, educator, and politician

Peter Gwinn, American comedy writer and improviser

Ralph W. Gwinn (1884–1962), Republican member of US House of Representatives from NY

Janina Minge

Janina Madeleine Minge (born 11 June 1999) is a German footballer who plays as a midfielder for Frauen-Bundesliga club SC Freiburg and the Germany women's national under-20 football team.

List of FIFA Women's World Cup goalscorers

This article lists each country's goalscorers in the FIFA Women's World Cup. There are 373 goalscorers for the 917 goals scored at the 8 editions of the World Cup final tournaments.

17

Numbers in green means the player finished as the tournament top scorer (or joint top scorer).

FC Bayern Munich (women) – current squad

Languages

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