Gilles Marotte

Jean Gilles Marotte (June 7, 1945 – July 26, 2005) was a Canadian defenceman in the National Hockey League with the Boston Bruins, Chicago Black Hawks, Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers and St. Louis Blues.

Born in Montreal, Quebec, Marotte played junior hockey for the Victoriaville Bruins in Quebec before joining the Niagara Falls Flyers of the Ontario Hockey Association in 1963. He was a first-team all-star on the Flyers team that won the 1965 Memorial Cup. Both of his junior teams were affiliated with the Boston Bruins, and Marotte began his NHL career with the Bruins in 1965. In May 1967, he was part of one of the biggest trades in Bruins history as one of three players sent to Chicago in the deal where Boston acquired Phil Esposito.

Marotte spent most of the next three seasons with the Black Hawks before being traded to the Los Angeles Kings in February 1970. While with the Kings in January 1971, Marotte broke rookie Darryl Sittler's wrist with a cross-check, giving him the most serious injury of his career. Marotte represented the Kings at the 1973 National Hockey League All-Star Game and scored a career-high 45 points that year. The next season, he was sent to the New York Rangers in the trade where the Kings acquired their future captain and coach, Mike Murphy. Marotte played in New York for three years. At the beginning of the 1976–77 season, Marotte was claimed on waivers by the St. Louis Blues, and spent time in the minor leagues for the only time in his career, playing for the Kansas City Blues in the Central Hockey League. The next season, Marotte jumped to the World Hockey Association to join the Cincinnati Stingers. He was traded mid-season to the Indianapolis Racers and finished his career there in 1978, retiring at the age of 33. Over his 13 seasons as a professional, Marotte appeared in 808 NHL games and 73 WHA games.

Marotte died of pancreatic cancer in 2005.

Gilles Marotte
Gilles Marotte 1976
Born June 7, 1945
Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Died July 26, 2005 (aged 60)
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for Boston Bruins
Chicago Black Hawks
Los Angeles Kings
New York Rangers
St. Louis Blues
Cincinnati Stingers
Indianapolis Racers
Playing career 1965–1978

Awards and achievements

  • QJHL First All-Star Team (1963)
  • OHA-Jr. First All-Star Team (1965)
  • Played in NHL All-Star Game (1973)

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1961–62 Victoriaville Bruins QJHL 43 15 28 43 10 1 3 4 6
1962–63 Victoriaville Bruins QJHL 52 12 25 37 10 1 7 8 20
1963–64 Niagara Falls Flyers OHA-Jr. 56 12 34 46 160 4 0 0 0 9
1963–64 Niagara Falls Flyers M-Cup 13 4 9 13 30
1964–65 Niagara Falls Flyers OHA-Jr. 52 12 25 37 122 11 2 0 2 50
1965–66 Boston Bruins NHL 51 3 17 20 52
1966–67 Boston Bruins NHL 67 7 8 15 112
1967–68 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 73 0 21 21 122 11 3 1 4 14
1968–69 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 68 5 29 34 120
1969–70 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 51 5 13 18 52
1969–70 Los Angeles Kings NHL 21 0 6 6 32
1970–71 Los Angeles Kings NHL 78 6 27 33 96
1971–72 Los Angeles Kings NHL 72 10 24 34 83
1972–73 Los Angeles Kings NHL 78 6 39 45 70
1973–74 Los Angeles Kings NHL 22 1 11 12 23
1973–74 New York Rangers NHL 46 2 17 19 28 12 0 1 1 6
1974–75 New York Rangers NHL 77 4 32 36 69 3 0 1 1 4
1975–76 New York Rangers NHL 57 4 17 21 34
1976–77 St. Louis Blues NHL 47 3 4 7 26 3 0 0 0 2
1976–77 Kansas City Blues CHL 26 1 10 11 46 7 2 0 2 2
1977–78 Cincinnati Stingers WHA 29 1 7 8 58
1977–78 Indianapolis Racers WHA 44 2 13 15 18
NHL totals 808 56 265 321 919 29 3 3 6 26

External links

1965 Memorial Cup

The 1965 Memorial Cup final was the 47th junior ice hockey championship of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. The George Richardson Memorial Trophy champions Niagara Falls Flyers of the Ontario Hockey Association in Eastern Canada competed against the Abbott Cup champions Edmonton Oil Kings of the Central Alberta Hockey League in Western Canada. In a best-of-seven series, held at Edmonton Gardens in Edmonton, Alberta, Niagara Falls won their 1st Memorial Cup, defeating Edmonton 4 games to 1.

In a rematch of the 1963 Memorial Cup between the Edmonton Oil Kings and the Niagara Falls Flyers, in which Edmonton came out on top, the Flyers took the first two wins in front of an Oil Kings crowd. By the third game, tensions had erupted and chaos ensued, with Edmonton spectators joining in on violent team brawls and police blanketing the arena. Edmonton won 5–1, but a total of 33 penalties and three player suspensions were earned in the last few minutes. Extra police were at the ready for the next games, but the Flyers came up with two big and relatively uneventful wins to secure the Cup.

1965–66 Boston Bruins season

The 1965–66 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 42nd season in the NHL.

1966–67 Boston Bruins season

The 1966–67 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 43rd season in the NHL. Despite the debut of Bobby Orr, the Bruins finished in last place and did not qualify for the playoffs. It was the last time the team would miss the playoffs until 1997, as they would embark on a streak of 29 straight seasons in the playoffs the next season.

1967–68 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1967–68 Chicago Black Hawks season was the Hawks' 42nd season in the NHL. The team was coming off their best regular season in team history. In 1966–67, Chicago finished in first place for the first time in club history with a franchise record 94 points. The Black Hawks were then upset by the Toronto Maple Leafs in six games in the NHL semi-finals.

1967–68 NHL season

The 1967–68 NHL season was the 51st season of the National Hockey League. The league expanded to 12 teams, putting the new six in the newly created West Division, while the original six were all placed in the newly created East Division. The regular season schedule was expanded to 74 games per team. The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup against the new St. Louis Blues, in four games.

1968 Stanley Cup playoffs

The 1968 Stanley Cup playoffs, to decide the 1968 championship of the National Hockey League (NHL) was the first after the expansion from six to twelve teams. The playoff system was thus expanded from a four-team to a eight-team tournament, and was designed so that four of the new expansion teams would qualify for the postseason.

The defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs did not qualify and a new champion would be crowned. The Montreal Canadiens would defeat the St. Louis Blues in four straight to win the Stanley Cup.

1968–69 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1968–69 Chicago Black Hawks season was the Hawks' 43rd season in the NHL, and the club was coming off a 4th-place finish in the East Division in 1967–68, as they earned 80 points, and qualified for the post-season for the tenth consecutive season. The Black Hawks then upset the second place New York Rangers in the NHL quarter-finals, before falling to the Montreal Canadiens in five games in the NHL semi-finals. But this season, the Blackhawks missed the postseason for the last time until 1998.

1969–70 Los Angeles Kings season

The 1969–70 Los Angeles Kings season was the third ever for the Los Angeles Kings in the National Hockey League. After qualifying for the playoffs in each of their first two seasons, under the direction of coach Red Kelly (who left to take the Pittsburgh job), the Kings fell into the basement of the Western Division. The team also fired coach Hal Laycoe after just 24 games. His replacement, Johnny Wilson, did not fare much better, winning just nine of the remaining 52 games on the schedule.

1970–71 Los Angeles Kings season

The 1970–71 Los Angeles Kings season was the Kings' fourth season of operation in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Kings finished in fifth place in the West Division and did not qualify for the playoffs.

1971–72 Los Angeles Kings season

The 1971–72 Los Angeles Kings season was the Kings' fifth season of operation in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Kings finished in last place in the West Division and did not qualify for the playoffs.

1972 NHL Expansion Draft

The 1972 NHL Expansion Draft was held on June 6, 1972. The draft took place to fill the rosters of the league's two then-new expansion teams for the 1972–73 season, the New York Islanders and the Atlanta Flames.

1973–74 Los Angeles Kings season

The 1973–74 Los Angeles Kings season was the Kings' seventh season of play.

1973–74 New York Rangers season

The 1973–74 New York Rangers season was the 48th season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Rangers compiled 94 points during the regular season and finished third in the East Division. The team made the Stanley Cup playoffs, where New York defeated the Montreal Canadiens 4–2 in the quarter-finals. The Rangers then lost in a seven-game semi-finals series to the Philadelphia Flyers, who went on to win the Stanley Cup that season.

1974–75 New York Rangers season

The 1974–75 New York Rangers season was the 49th season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league realignment had the Rangers moved into the new Patrick Division within the Campbell Conference, where the team finished 2nd with 88 points. They qualified for the playoffs, losing in the preliminary round to the New York Islanders 2–1 in a best of three games series.

1976–77 St. Louis Blues season

The 1976–77 St. Louis Blues season was the tenth for the franchise in St. Louis, Missouri. The Blues won the Smythe Division title with a record of 32 wins, 39 losses and nine ties, good for 73 points, and received a first-round bye in the 1977 NHL Playoffs. However, the Blues were no match for the eventual Stanley Cup champion Montreal Canadiens, as the Montrealers swept the Blues in the quarter-finals.

Hap Emms

Leighton Alfred Emms (January 12, 1905 – October 23, 1988) was a Canadian ice hockey player, coach, team owner, and general manager, during nearly 60 years in hockey. Emms played 17 seasons of professional hockey as a left winger and a defenceman, including 10 seasons and 320 games in the National Hockey League. After playing, Emms had a 33 year presence in the Ontario Hockey Association, as the owner of the Barrie Flyers, Niagara Falls Flyers, and St. Catharines Black Hawks between 1945 and 1978. Teams that Emms coached or owned appeared in eight Memorial Cup tournaments, winning four Memorial Cups. He was nicknamed "Happy Emms" due to the sour look on his face, which was later shortened to "Hap Emms."

List of Cincinnati Stingers players

This is a list of players who have played at least one game for the Cincinnati Stingers of the World Hockey Association from 1975–76 to 1978–79.

List of Indianapolis Racers players

This is a list of players who played at least one game for the Indianapolis Racers of the World Hockey Association (WHA) from the 1974–75 to 1978.

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