Gilby Engineering

Gilby Engineering was a British general engineering company owned by Syd Greene. Greene had lost an arm in an accident so he was unable to drive a racing car effectively. He fed his enthusiasm for motor racing by founding a motor racing team named after his company and later constructing the Gilby racing car. The team competed in 12 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, including 6 with cars of their own construction, but scored no World Championship points. The Gilby cars were constructed by Syd Greene for his son Keith to drive, having previously entered a Maserati 250F for Roy Salvadori and Ivor Bueb and also a Cooper for Greene Jr. Keith Greene later became better known as a team manager in Formula One and sports car racing. Gilby made its debut in the 1954 French Grand Prix with the Maserati, for Salvadori, who also drove for the team in 1955 and 1956, and the team's last event was the 1962 Italian Grand Prix. After the team ceased competing in Formula One, the final Gilby car was purchased and entered in three events in 1963, by privateer Ian Raby.[1] Keith Greene achieved a third-place finish in the non-championship Naples Grand Prix of 1962, with the BRM-engined car, behind the works Ferrari's of Willy Mairesse and Lorenzo Bandini.[2]

Gilby
Full nameGilby Engineering
Founder(s)Syd Greene
Noted staffLen Terry
Noted driversUnited Kingdom Roy Salvadori
United Kingdom Ivor Bueb
United Kingdom Keith Greene
Formula One World Championship career
First entry1954 French Grand Prix
Races entered12 (10 starts)
ConstructorsMaserati, Cooper, Gilby
EnginesMaserati l6, Climax l4, BRM V8
Constructors'
Championships
0
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories0
Podiums0
Points0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
Final entry1962 Italian Grand Prix

Complete Formula One World Championship results

Gilby Engineering

(key)

Year Chassis Engine Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Points WCC
1954 Maserati 250F Maserati I6 P ARG 500 BEL FRA GBR GER SUI ITA ESP -* n/a*
Roy Salvadori Ret Ret
1955 Maserati 250F Maserati I6 P ARG MON 500 BEL NED GBR ITA -* n/a*
Roy Salvadori Ret
1956 Maserati 250F Maserati I6 P ARG MON 500 BEL FRA GBR GER ITA -* n/a*
Roy Salvadori Ret Ret 11
1957 Maserati 250F Maserati I6 P ARG MON 500 FRA GBR GER PES ITA -* n/a*
Ivor Bueb NC
1959 Cooper T43 Climax l4 D MON 500 NED FRA GBR GER POR ITA USA -* n/a*
Keith Greene DNQ
1960 Cooper T45 Maserati l4 D ARG MON 500 NED BEL FRA GBR POR ITA USA -* n/a*
Keith Greene Ret
1961 Gilby 61 Climax l4 D MON NED BEL FRA GBR GER ITA USA 0 NC
Keith Greene 15
1962 Gilby 62 BRM V8 D NED MON BEL FRA GBR GER ITA USA RSA 0 NC
Keith Greene Ret DNQ
Source:[3]

* Gilby did not compete as a constructor

Other Gilby cars

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1963 Ian Raby Gilby 62 BRM V8 D MON BEL NED FRA GBR GER ITA USA MEX RSA
Ian Raby Ret DNQ DNQ
Source:[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 307. ISBN 0851127029.
  2. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 165. ISBN 0851127029.
  3. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. pp. 87, 164 and 333. ISBN 0851127029.
1957 Glover Trophy

The 1957 Glover Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 22 April 1957 at Goodwood Circuit, England. The race was run over 42 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Stuart Lewis-Evans in a Connaught B Type.

The Team Lotus and Cooper Car Company works entries were Formula Two cars.

1961 Aintree 200

The 6th Aintree 200 was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 22 April 1961 at Aintree Circuit, England. The race was run over 50 laps of the circuit, and was won by Australian driver Jack Brabham in a Cooper T55.

1961 Glover Trophy

The 9th Glover Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 3 April 1961 at Goodwood Circuit, England. The race was run over 42 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver John Surtees in a Cooper T53. The event was held on the same day as the 1961 Pau Grand Prix, which compromised the quality of the entry at both meetings.

1961 International Gold Cup

The 8th Gold Cup was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 23 September 1961 at Oulton Park, England. The race was run over 60 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Stirling Moss in a Ferguson P99.

This was the only time a Formula One race has been won by a Four-wheel drive car, the damp conditions proving ideal for the car's extra traction.

1961 Lewis-Evans Trophy

The 5th Lewis-Evans Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 1 October 1961 at Brands Hatch Circuit. The race was run over 30 laps of the circuit, and was dominated by British driver Tony Marsh in a BRM P48.

This Formula One race was unusual in that non-British competitors were not permitted to take part. French driver Bernard Collomb, who had intended to enter the race, decided to lend his car to John Campbell-Jones.

1961 London Trophy

The 9th London Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 22 May 1961 at Crystal Palace Circuit. The race was run over 37 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Roy Salvadori in a Cooper T53.

This race was run on the same day as the World Championship 1961 Dutch Grand Prix, but since entry to that event was by invitation only, many regular Formula One drivers were attracted to Crystal Palace.

1961 Silver City Trophy

The sixth Silver City Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 3 June 1961 at Brands Hatch Circuit. The race was run over 76 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Stirling Moss in a Lotus 18/21.

The race was overshadowed by a fatal accident during qualifying when Shane Summers crashed his Cooper T53 into the concrete entrance to the paddock road tunnel.

1962 Aintree 200

The 7th Aintree 200 was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 28 April 1962 at Aintree Circuit, England. The race was run over 50 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Jim Clark in a Lotus 24.

1962 BRDC International Trophy

The 14th BRDC International Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 12 May 1962 at the Silverstone Circuit, England. The race was run over 52 laps of the Silverstone Grand Prix circuit, and was won by British driver Graham Hill in a BRM P57.

1962 Crystal Palace Trophy

The 13th Crystal Palace Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 11 June 1962 at the Crystal Palace Circuit, London. The race was run over 36 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Innes Ireland in a Lotus 24.

Ireland arrived too late to take part in practice and had to start from the back of the grid. He won anyway, taking the lead in the first few laps. John Campbell-Jones' car retired with fuel feed problems, and he later admitted he suspected foul play.Another Formula One race was held on the same day, the 1962 International 2000 Guineas, at Mallory Park.

1962 Glover Trophy

The 10th Glover Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 23 April 1962 at Goodwood Circuit, England. The race was run over 42 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Graham Hill in a BRM P57.

This race was held directly after the 1962 Lavant Cup, on the same day at the same circuit. Bruce McLaren, who had won the Lavant Cup, finished second in this race. Another Formula One race, the 1962 Pau Grand Prix, was also held on the same day.

This event was particularly notable for the serious accident suffered by Stirling Moss, which ended his racing career.

1962 International Gold Cup

The 9th Gold Cup was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 1 September 1962 at Oulton Park, England. The race was run over 73 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Jim Clark in a Lotus 25.

1962 Mediterranean Grand Prix

The 1st Mediterranean Grand Prix was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 19 August 1962 at the Autodromo di Pergusa, Sicily. The race was run over 50 laps of the circuit, and was dominated by Ferrari. The winner was Lorenzo Bandini in a Ferrari 156.

Gilby

Gilby may refer to:

Gilby (surname)

Gilby, North Dakota, a city in North Dakota in the United States

Gilby Engineering, motor racing team and racing car constructor

Gilby (surname)

Gilby is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Anthony Gilby (c.1510–1585), English clergyman

Fred Gilby (1907–1991), Australian rules footballer

Helen Gilby (born 1974), British sprint canoer

John Gilby (1900–1985), New Zealand rower

Ivor Bueb

Ivor Léon John Bueb (6 June 1923 – 1 August 1959) was a British professional sports car racing and Formula One driver from England.Born in East Ham, Essex, Bueb started racing seriously in a Formula Three 500cc Cooper in 1953, graduating to the Cooper works team in 1955 when he finished second in the British championship. He made occasional starts in Grands Prix in 1957 with a Connaught and a Maserati run by Gilby Engineering. The following year he raced Bernie Ecclestone's Connaught at Monaco, and drove a Formula Two Lotus at the German Grand Prix.

In 1959 he had two outings for BRP, firstly a non-qualification at Monaco, then another Formula Two entry at the British Grand Prix. He participated in six Formula One World Championship Grands Prix in all, but scored no championship points. He also participated in numerous non-Championship Formula One races. With the death of Archie Scott Brown at Spa in May 1958, Brian Lister hired Bueb to fill the now-vacant Lister-Jaguar driver's seat. Bueb did an admirable job, scoring several first places at tracks such as Crystal Palace and Goodwood during the 1958 and 1959 sports car campaigns.

Bueb is perhaps best known for sharing the winning works Jaguar D-type with Mike Hawthorn in the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans which was marred by an accident in which 82 spectators were killed; a success he repeated with Ron Flockhart in the ex-works Ecurie Ecosse car in 1957.He suffered serious injuries in 1959 when he crashed his BRP Cooper-Borgward Formula Two car at the Charade Circuit near Clermont-Ferrand, France. He crashed at Gravenoire, a multiple apex-section at the very far end of the circuit, and was thrown out of his Cooper. He died six days later at a hospital near the circuit.It was Ivor Bueb's death, in conjunction with Archie Scott Brown's demise, that finally led Brian Lister to shut down his very successful sports car racing effort.

Keith Greene

Keith Greene (born 5 January 1938) is a British former racing driver from England. He raced in Formula One from 1959 to 1962, participating in six World Championship Grands Prix and numerous non-Championship races.Prior to Formula One, Greene had a successful career in sportscars. In 1956 using a Cooper T39 he competed in 11 national level races finishing outside the top six on only one occasion, with two wins and three other podium finishes.After retiring from driving, Greene became a team manager in Formula One and sports car racing. He worked for Hexagon of Highgate in London running their newly formed motorcycle business in the late 1970s. At that time he also managed Alain de Cadenet's Le Mans racing team.

Maserati Grand Prix results

Maserati competed in Grand Prix racing from 1931 to 1957.

Roy Salvadori

Roy Francesco Salvadori (12 May 1922 – 3 June 2012) was a British racing driver and team manager. He was born in Dovercourt, Essex, to parents of Italian descent. He graduated to Formula One by 1952 and competed regularly until 1962 for a succession of teams including Cooper, Vanwall, BRM, Aston Martin and Connaught. Also a competitor in other formulae, he won the 1959 24 Heures du Mans in an Aston Martin with co-driver Carroll Shelby.

In 47 starts he achieved two F1 Championship podium finishes: third place at the 1958 British Grand Prix and second place at that year's German Grand Prix, and won non-championship races in Australia, New Zealand and England. In 1961 he was lying second in the United States Grand Prix when his Cooper's engine failed. At the end of 1962 he retired from F1, and stopped racing altogether a couple of years later to concentrate on the motor trade. He returned to the sport in 1966 to manage the Cooper-Maserati squad for two seasons, and eventually retired to Monaco.

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