Gil Haskell

Gil Haskell (born September 24, 1943) is a former American football coach. A long-time assistant coach in the National Football League (NFL) coach he served as the offensive coordinator for the Seattle Seahawks from 2000 to 2008. He began his career in the NFL as a ball boy with the San Francisco 49ers while his uncle, William O'Grady, was a part owner of the franchise. Haskell grew up in St. Brendan's Parish in San Francisco and graduated from St. Ignatius College Preparatory in 1961. he played ppcollege football]] played at San Francisco State University and then was head coach at St. Ignatius from 1973 to 1977. Haskell then left for University of Southern California (USC), spending five seasons there as an assistant coach. He broke into the NFL as a coach in 1983 with the Los Angeles Rams, coaching special teams, running backs and tight ends for nine seasons. In 1992, he joined the Green Bay Packers where he became part of Mike Holmgren's staff for the first time as a running back coach and wide receiver coach. When Holmgren left Green Bay for the Seattle Seahawks in 1998, Haskell accepted the offensive coordinator position with the Carolina Panthers. In 2000, he reunited with Holmgren in Seattle in the same role. He has indicated that he would like to be a head coach in the NFL and even launched a low key campaign for the Oakland Raiders position when the Raiders fired Norv Turner after the 2005 season.[1] That position was eventually filled with the hiring of Art Shell.

On February 10, 2010 the Cleveland Browns announced that Haskell as the senior advisor to president Mike Holmgren.

Haskell and his late wife, Nancy, have four daughters: Paula, Patty, Jenny and Julie.

Gil Haskell
Personal information
Born:September 24, 1943 (age 75)
Career information
High school:St. Ignatius College Preparatory
College:San Francisco State
Career history
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Coaching stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ Kelley, Steve (January 18, 2006). "Seattle Times Story". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 18, 2006.
1983 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1983 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 46th year with the National Football League and the 38th season in the city of Los Angeles. The franchise drafted a future Hall of Fame Running Back in Eric Dickerson. The season saw the team attempt to improve on its 2-7 record from 1982. The team started out 5-2 before splitting their next 4 games and then lost at home to Washington to sit at 7-5. They would split their last 4 games to finish 9-7 and make the playoffs for the first time since 1980 after a 2-year absence. In the playoffs, they defeated the Cowboys 24-17 in Dallas to advance to the Divisional Round. However, in the game, the Rams were annihilated 51-7 by the Redskins, who would move on to the Super Bowl later, only to lose to the Los Angeles Raiders, 38-9.

1985 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1985 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, their 38th overall, and their 40th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams played in the NFC Championship Game, but were shutout by the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears. Eric Dickerson rushed for 1,234 yards in 1985 while missing the first two games while in a contract dispute. He missed the Pro Bowl for the first time in his short NFL career. He did, however, go on to rush for a playoff record 248 yards against the Dallas Cowboys in post-season play. It was also the last time the Rams would win an NFC West divisional title for Los Angeles until 2017, and the last NFC West title until 1999 while they were in St. Louis.

1987 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1987 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's strike shortened 50th season in the National Football League, their 40th overall, and their 42nd in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The season saw the Rams attempting to improve on their 10-6 record from 1986 and make the playoffs for the 5th straight season. However, the Rams struggled right out the gate. In their first 2 games against the Houston Oilers and Minnesota Vikings, the Rams had 4th quarter leads and blew them. They led 13-0 in the 4th quarter at Houston and lost 20-16, while they led 16-14 at home against Minnesota and lost 21-16. The next week, a strike occurred which wiped out all week 3 games. As a result, their game at home against the Cincinnati Bengals was canceled. One week later, the Rams were thumped by the Saints 37-10 to start the season 0-3, their first such start since 1982, which was, ironically, also a season that saw a strike take place. The Rams finally got in the win column the next week, beating the Pittsburgh Steelers at home, 31-21. However, the next week in Atlanta, the Rams lost another big lead, this time after leading 17-0 at halftime and 20-7 in the 4th quarter. This was followed by embarrassing losses to the Cleveland Browns (30-17), the arch-rival San Francisco 49ers (31-10), and the Saints again (31-14) to drop to 1-7, their worst start since 1965, when they started 1-9. However, the Rams then caught fire, beating the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis, 27-24, after trailing 24-14 in the 3rd quarter. The next week in Washington, the Rams outlasted the Washington Redskins on Monday Night Football 30-26, and it appeared as though the Rams were poised to get back in the playoff race. The win over Washington was followed by blowout wins over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (35-3), Detroit Lions (37-16), and Atlanta Falcons (33-0) and the Rams were looking to make an improbable in-season turnaround. However, the next week against the Dallas Cowboys, the Rams lost 29-21 to eliminate them from the playoffs. The season ended with the Rams getting pummeled by the 49ers on the road, 48-0. Ultimately, the Rams finished the strike-shortened season 6-9 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1982.

1990 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1990 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 53rd year with the National Football League and the 45th season in Los Angeles. On November 11, 1990, Marcus Dupree made his NFL debut against the New York Giants. The Rams temporarily playing in the Los Angeles Coliseum looked to improve on their 11-5 season from 1989 and make the playoffs for the 3rd straight season and be possible contenders for the Super Bowl. However, the Rams would struggle all season, starting 1-4 before winning 2 of their next 3 games before losing their next 2 games as they dipped to a 3-7 record. After a win over Cleveland, the Rams upset the 49ers 28-17 in San Francisco to improve to 5-7. However, this would be perhaps the only good highlight of the season for the Rams, as after the win, they ended the season on a 4 game losing streak as the Rams finished with a disappointing 5-11 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1987.

1991 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1991 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 54th year with the National Football League and the 46th season in Los Angeles. The team was looking to improve on its 5-11 record from 1990. However, the Rams finished the 1991 season 3-13, tied for the second worst record in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. After splitting their first 6 games, the Rams lost their final 10 games of the season, their longest losing streak to end a season since 1937, when the team was in Cleveland, when the team lost 9 in a row to end that season. The 3-13 record was the worst for the Rams in Los Angeles for a 16-game schedule and they tied the third-fewest posted by the team in its tenure in the city. This was also, at the time, the worst record for the Rams in a 16-game schedule overall (not including the 1982 strike-shortened season).

The 1991 Rams' pass defense surrendered 7.86 yards-per-pass attempt (including quarterback sacks), the fourth-most in the history of the league.

1992 Green Bay Packers season

The 1992 Green Bay Packers season was their 74th season overall and their 72nd in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–7 record under new coach Mike Holmgren, earning them a second-place finish in the NFC Central division. 1992 saw the emergence of QB Brett Favre and the start of the Packers' success of the 1990s.

1993 Green Bay Packers season

The 1993 Green Bay Packers season was their 75th season overall and their 73rd in the National Football League. They had a 9–7 record and won their first playoff berth in 11 years. The record also marked the first back-to-back winning season since the Packers 1967 season. During the regular season, the Packers finished with 340 points, ranking sixth in the National Football League], and allowed 282 points, ranking ninth. In his third year as a pro and second with the Packers, quarterback Brett Favre led the Packers offense, passing for 3,303 yards and 19 touchdowns. Favre, who played his first full season, was selected to his second of eleven Pro Bowl appearances.

In the playoffs, the Packers played in the NFC Wild Card Game against the Detroit Lions. The Packers won 28–24, closing with a 40-yard touchdown pass from Brett Favre to Sterling Sharpe with 55 seconds left. In the NFC Divisional Playoff Game, the Packers played the Dallas Cowboys and lost 27–17.

The Packers commemorated their 75th overall season of professional football in 1993 with a "75" logo uniform patch, one year before the NFL's diamond anniversary.

1994 Green Bay Packers season

The 1994 Green Bay Packers season was the team's 76th season overall and their 74th in the National Football League. The Packers posted a 9–7 record for their third straight winning season. 1994 marked the first of 8 seasons in which Packers' quarterback Brett Favre would throw more than 30 touchdown passes. It also marked the second season in which he started all 16 games for the Packers, starting a record-breaking starting streak which would continue throughout his career. This was the final season that the Packers played at Milwaukee County Stadium; they played home games exclusively at Lambeau beginning in 1995. Three Packers had the distinction of being named to the NFL's All-Time 75th Anniversary Team: Reggie White, Don Hutson, and Ray Nitschke. After defeating the Detroit Lions 16–12 in the NFC Wild Card Game, the season ended in a 35–9 loss to the Dallas Cowboys in an NFC Divisional Playoff Game.Despite another stellar season, Brett Favre, for the first time in his career, was not eligible for the Pro Bowl.

1995 Green Bay Packers season

The 1995 Green Bay Packers season was their 77th season overall and their 75th in the National Football League. The Packers obtained an 11–5 mark in the regular season and won the NFC Central, their first division title since 1972. In the playoffs, the Packers defeated the Atlanta Falcons at home and the defending champion San Francisco 49ers on the road before losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the NFL's Most Valuable Player, the first of three such awards he would win.

This was the first season that the Packers played home games exclusively at Lambeau Field, after playing part of their home slate at Milwaukee County Stadium since 1953. After losing their home opener to St. Louis, the Packers would win an NFL-record 25 consecutive home games between the rest of 1995 and early in 1998.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1997 Green Bay Packers season

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League. The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing in a 31–24 upset to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

After a dominating 1996 campaign which ended with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI, many expected the Packers to repeat as champions in 1997. During training camp, star safety LeRoy Butler, among others, said that the Packers had the chance to run the table and go 19–0. This opinion drew increased coverage from the media as the Packers notched impressive victories in all five preseason games. The undefeated hype ended quickly, however, when Green Bay lost week 2 in Philadelphia.

Following a relatively slow 3–2 start, the Packers caught fire in the second half of the season, finishing with a 13–3 regular season record and 8–0 home record for the second consecutive year. In the playoffs, Green Bay defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in the divisional round, and San Francisco 49ers at 3Com Park in the NFC Championship. Some in the media dubbed the NFC title game as "the real Super Bowl" because of the 49ers' and Packers' league dominance, and the relative inferiority of the AFC in recent Super Bowls. Green Bay's win marked the third consecutive year the team had defeated San Francisco in the playoffs.

The Packers entered Super Bowl XXXII as 11 1/2-point favorites. The point spread was likely determined by Green Bay's victory in the previous Super Bowl, the AFC's string of 13 consecutive Super Bowl losses, and Denver's losses in four previous Super Bowls. The game itself was a seesaw battle, and one of the most exciting Super Bowls in history. The Broncos won the thriller 31–24, earning John Elway his first Super Bowl victory at the age of 37, and the first championship in franchise history. Years later, Brett Favre said the Broncos were far underrated, and credited Denver's innovative blitz packages and strategies, foreign to the league at that time, for confusing the Packers.

Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the league's MVP for the third year in a row in 1997. Favre was the first player in the history of the award to win three MVPs, and remains the only player to have won three MVPs consecutively. The Packers became the first team to have six NFL MVP award winners.The 1997 Packers are one of only two teams in NFL history to win seven games against teams that would go on to make the playoffs.

1998 Carolina Panthers season

The 1998 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 4th season in the National Football League and the 4th and final under head coach Dom Capers. They tried to improve upon their 7-9 record in 1997, and make it to the playoffs for the second time in franchise history. But failed and finished at a franchise worst 4–12 in 1998 and fourth of five teams in the NFC West until 2001. Dom Capers was fired at the end of the season and replaced by George Seifert.

1999 Carolina Panthers season

The 1999 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League and the 1st and under head coach George Seifert who replaced Dom Capers as head coach. They improved upon their 4–12 record in 1998, and the Panthers went 8–8, their first .500 record in franchise history, But failed to make the playoffs for the second time in franchise history.

2000 Seattle Seahawks season

The 2000 Seattle Seahawks season was the franchise's 25th season in the National Football League, The first of two seasons the Seahawks played at Husky Stadium while Qwest Field was being built and the second under head coach Mike Holmgren. The 2000 Seahawks' pass defense surrendered 7.63 yards-per-attempt (including quarterback sacks), one of the ten-worst totals in the history of the NFL. They failed to improve on their 9-7 record from 1999 and missed out on the playoffs since 1998.

Bill Musgrave

William Scott Musgrave (born November 11, 1967) is an American football coach and former quarterback, offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach for multiple National Football League (NFL) teams. He played college football at the University of Oregon. Musgrave is a 21-year coaching veteran with 19 years of NFL experience as a quarterbacks coach or offensive coordinator. He has previously coached in the NFL with Denver (2017-2019), Oakland (2015-16, 1997), Philadelphia (2014, 1998), Minnesota (2011-13), Atlanta (2006-10), Washington (2005), Jacksonville (2003-04) and Carolina (1999-2000). During his coaching career, Musgrave helped three different quarterbacks to Pro Bowl seasons: Derek Carr (2015-16), Matt Ryan (2010) and Steve Beuerlein (1999).

Jim Zorn

James Arthur Zorn (born May 10, 1953) is a former American football player and coach in the National Football League. He is the general manager and head coach of the Seattle XFL team set to begin in 2020. Zorn was a left-handed quarterback, and is best known as the starting quarterback of the Seattle Seahawks for their first eight seasons. He was the quarterbacks coach for the Seattle Seahawks from 2001 until the 2007 season, before being hired by the Washington Redskins to be their head coach starting in the 2008 season.

Shortly after being fired following the 2009 season, Zorn was hired as quarterbacks coach of the Baltimore Ravens. Zorn was released as quarterbacks coach of the Ravens on January 27, 2011, and then joined the Kansas City Chiefs as their new quarterbacks coach for the 2011 season.

Vic Rowen

Victor Rowen (July 24, 1919 – January 14, 2013) was an American football, basketball. and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Defiance College from 1951 to 1953 and at San Francisco State University from 1961 to 1989, compiling a career college football record of 132–173–10. His tenure of 28 years as head coach San Francisco State spanned over half of the length of time college football was played at the school. Rowen was also the head basketball coach at Defiance from 1951 to 1954 at and San Francisco State for a season in 1957–58, tallying a career college basketball mark of 54–34.

West Coast offense

In American football, the West Coast offense is an offense that places a greater emphasis on passing than on running.

There are two similar but distinct offensive strategic systems that are commonly referred to as "West Coast offenses". Originally, the term referred to the Air Coryell system popularized by Don Coryell. Following a journalistic error, however, it now more commonly refers to the offensive system devised by Bill Walsh while he was the offensive coordinator of the Cincinnati Bengals, characterized by short, horizontal passing routes in lieu of running plays to "stretch out" defenses, opening up the potential for long runs or long passes. It was popularized when Walsh was the head coach of the San Francisco 49ers.

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