Giancarlo Baghetti

Giancarlo Baghetti (25 December 1934 in Milan, Italy – 27 November 1995 also in Milan) was a Formula One driver who raced for the Ferrari, ATS (the Italian team), BRM, Brabham and Lotus teams.

Baghetti is one of only three drivers to have won his first World Championship race, the other two being Nino Farina, who won the first World Championship race (the 1950 British Grand Prix) and Johnnie Parsons, who won the 1950 Indianapolis 500 (the Indianapolis 500 was part of the World Championship from 1950 to 1960).

Giancarlo Baghetti
Born25 December 1934
Milan, Lombardy, Kingdom of Italy
Died27 November 1995 (aged 60)
Milan, Lombardy, Italy
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityItaly Italian
Active years19611967
TeamsFerrari, Automobili Turismo e Sport, Scuderia Centro Sud, Brabham, Reg Parnell, Lotus
Entries21
Championships0
Wins1
Podiums1
Career points14
Pole positions0
Fastest laps1
First entry1961 French Grand Prix
First win1961 French Grand Prix
Last win1961 French Grand Prix
Last entry1967 Italian Grand Prix

Formula One career

Baghetti was born in Milan. His father was a wealthy Milan industrialist.[1]He began racing in 1955 in production cars, moving up to Formula Junior in 1958. In 1961 he was selected by the Federazione Italiana Scuderie Automobilistiche (FISA), a coalition of independent Italian team owners who had agreed a loan deal with Ferrari for a 156 Dino[2] Formula Two car to run in non-Championship Grand Prix, giving experience to promising Italian drivers. Despite not showing spectacular form in lower categories, Baghetti was chosen over Albino Buttichi and Lucien de Sanctis for the seat. The car was first entered for the Syracuse Grand Prix, the first major event run under the new 1.5-litre championship regulations, and against a strong field Baghetti qualified second and won in the only Ferrari, with the British teams and Porsche 718 flat 4 unable to compete with the Dino's V6. He then drove the same car to win at the Napoli Grand Prix a few weeks later.

Team FISA entered an original 60-degree V6 Ferrari 156, at least 10 hp down on power, for Baghetti in the 1961 French Grand Prix at Reims-Gueux, for this World Championship event. Once Wolfgang von Trips, Richie Ginther and Phil Hill had all retired their works 156s, Baghetti was left to uphold Ferrari honour. He overcame Dan Gurney's Porsche 718 to take victory, giving him a hat trick of wins from his first three Grand Prix. Gurney was leading with 100 yd (91 m) to go as the cars raced to the finish line at 160 mph (260 km/h). The victory meant Baghetti became the first Italian since 1956 to win a Formula One World Championship event.[1] It also ensured that he became the first, and only driver ever to win on their World Championship Grand Prix debut against a field that did not consist entirely of other debutant drivers.

He entered two more Championship races, retiring from the 1961 British Grand Prix and 1961 Italian Grand Prix, though he posted fastest lap in the latter. He also won the poorly attended Prima Coppa Italia race at Vallelunga in a Porsche 718.

He was promoted to the works Ferrari line-up for 1962, but took just two Championship placings – fourth at the Dutch Grand Prix, and fifth at the Italian Grand Prix, as Ferrari was outclassed by the British teams. Baghetti took second in the non-Championship Mediterranean Grand Prix. He was offered a full Ferrari F1 drive for 1963, but had already signed with a rival team. Enzo Ferrari rated Baghetti highly, calling him, 'a lesser Varzi'.[3] Baghetti was involved in 1963 in the disastrous ATS effort in 1963, joining up with Phil Hill for Carlo Chiti's breakaway team, but failed to register a finish from five starts. For 1964 he switched to Scuderia Centro Sud's outdated BRM P57 cars, peaking with seventh at the Austrian Grand Prix. His Grand Prix career was then virtually over, though he had three more one-off drives, all at the Italian Grand Prix – a works Brabham in 1965, a Reg Parnell-semiworks Dino Ferrari 2.4 V6 in which he ran strongly ahead of Arundell's Lotus V8 Climax and Anderson's 2.7 litre Brabham, running 5th in 1966 and a similarly competent drive in a works Lotus 49 in 1967, running in midfield and passing Amon and Ickx and would have scored a point but for a blown engine.

Post Formula One racing

He achieved some success in the European Touring Car Championship with Alfa Romeo and FIAT Abarth, winning the 1966 1000cc Class Championship in an Abarth 1000. After dabbling in Formula Three, he retired after a huge accident at the 1967 "Monza Lottery". Boley Pittard of England was burned severely when his Lola burst into flames at the start of the final qualifying heat. Baghetti won the event in a Branca with an average speed over thirty-five laps of 114 mph (183 km/h)[4] In June 1968 Baghetti was in a huge pile-up on the 23rd lap of a Formula Two race at Monza. He was driving a Dino.[5]

He later became a journalist and photographer in motorsport and fashion.

Death and legacy

Baghetti died of cancer in 1995.

Baghetti's Championship debut win has secured him a footnote in Formula One history, as he became the only driver to have won his first three Formula One races, starting with two non-championship Grand Prix races in Italy.

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 WDC Points
1961 FISA Ferrari 156 Ferrari V6 MON NED BEL FRA
1
9th 9
Scuderia Sant Ambroeus GBR
Ret
GER ITA
Ret
USA
1962 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 156 Ferrari V6 NED
4
MON BEL
Ret
FRA GBR GER
10
ITA
5
USA RSA 11th 5
1963 Automobili Turismo e Sport ATS 100 ATS V8 MON BEL
Ret
NED
Ret
FRA GBR GER ITA
15
USA
Ret
MEX
Ret
RSA NC 0
1964 Scuderia Centro Sud BRM P57 BRM V8 MON
DNA
NED
10
BEL
8
FRA GBR
12
GER
Ret
AUT
7
ITA
8
USA MEX NC 0
1965 Brabham Racing Organisation Brabham BT7 Climax V8 RSA MON BEL FRA GBR NED GER ITA
Ret
USA MEX NC 0
1966 Reg Parnell Racing Ltd Ferrari 246 Ferrari V6 MON BEL FRA GBR NED GER ITA
NC
USA MEX NC 0
1967 Team Lotus Lotus 49 Cosworth V8 RSA MON NED BEL FRA GBR GER CAN ITA
Ret
USA MEX NC 0

Non-championship

(key) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
1961 FISA Ferrari 156 Ferrari V6 LOM GLV PAU BRX VIE AIN SYR
1
NAP
1
LON SIL SOL KAN DAN MOD FLG OUL LEW
Scuderia Sant Ambroeus Porsche 718 Porsche Flat-4 VAL
1
RAN NAT RSA
1962 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 156 Ferrari V6 CAP BRX LOM LAV GLV PAU AIN
4
INT NAP MAL CLP RMS
DNA
SOL KAN MED
2
DAN OUL MEX RAN NAT
1963 Ecurie Filipinetti Lotus 21 Climax Straight-4 LOM GLV PAU IMO
DNQ
SYR AIN INT ROM SOL KAN MED AUT OUL RAN
1964 Scuderia Centro Sud BRM P57 BRM V8 DMT
DNS
NWT
9
SYR
Ret
AIN
9
INT
8
SOL MED RAN
1965 Scuderia Centro Sud BRM P57 BRM V8 ROC SYR SMT INT MED
Ret
RAN
1966 Anglo-Suisse Racing Team Lotus 33 Climax V8 RSA SYR
DNS
INT OUL

References

  1. ^ a b Baghetti Of Italy Takes Auto Race, New York Times, July 3, 1961, Page 11.
  2. ^ It's not clear if this was a 156 F2 car as used in 1950s, or a new 156 F1 car of 1961 (Small (2000), p. 51, simply lists all 3 entries by Baghetti in 1961 as "1.5 Ferrari 156 V6"). Confusion is mostly due to the multiple different Ferrari models sharing same model numbers in the early years.
  3. ^ Enzo Ferrari 'Some Drivers'. Automobile Year 1977-78 (1977)
  4. ^ Driver Is Badly Burned as Flames Engulf Car at Start of Monza Race, New York Times, June 5, 1967, p.56.
  5. ^ Briton Takes Flag At Monza, European Stars and Stripes, June 25, 1968, p.19.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ed Swart
European Touring Car Championship champion (Div.1)
1966
Succeeded by
Willi Kauhsen
1960 Campionato Italiano season

The 1960 Campionatio Italiano was the 3rd season of the Campionato Italiano. Renato Pirocchi won this championship. Many rounds were run in conjunction 1960 Campionatio A.N.P.E.C./Auto Italiana d’Europa (World Car Trophy Italian ANPEC), which saw Colin Davis win the title.

1961 Coppa Italia

The 1st Coppa Italia was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 12 October 1961 at Vallelunga Circuit. The race was run over two heats of 30 laps of the circuit, and was won by Italian driver Giancarlo Baghetti in a Porsche 718.

After the Italian Drivers' Championship finished as a tie between Giancarlo Baghetti and Lorenzo Bandini, a deciding race was organised. However, the fairness of this idea is in question since it was well known that Bandini would not be available to take part. Baghetti's team, Scuderia Sant Ambroeus, borrowed the Porsche from Ecurie Nationale Suisse, and their driver won both heats to take the national title.

1961 Formula One season

The 1961 Formula One season was the 15th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1961 World Championship of Drivers and the 1961 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, which were contested concurrently from 14 May to 8 October over an eight race series. The season also included numerous non-championship races for Formula One cars.

Phil Hill of Ferrari won his only Drivers' Championship after his teammate and rival Wolfgang von Trips was killed at the Italian Grand Prix, the penultimate race of the season. Ferrari won its first F1 manufacturers' title.

1961 French Grand Prix

The 1961 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 2 July 1961 at Reims. It was race 4 of 8 in both the 1961 World Championship of Drivers and the 1961 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

By winning the race, Giancarlo Baghetti became only the third driver to win his first World Championship race, the other two being Nino Farina, who won the first World Championship race (the 1950 British Grand Prix) and Johnnie Parsons, who won the 1950 Indianapolis 500 (the Indianapolis 500 was part of the World Championship from 1950 to 1960), though both Farina and Parsons had competed at future World Championship races before the creation of the championship, while this was Baghetti's first start at a major Grand Prix. This was Baghetti's only World Championship race win. He would never finish in the top 3 again.

1961 Italian Grand Prix

The 1961 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 10 September 1961 at Monza. It was race 7 of 8 in both the 1961 World Championship of Drivers and the 1961 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

The race was marked by one of the most terrible accidents in the history of Formula One, when on the end of lap 2 at the approach to the Parabolica German driver Wolfgang von Trips lost control of his Ferrari and crashed into a stand full of spectators, killing 15 and himself. The race was not stopped, allegedly to avoid the audience going home en masse jamming the roads around the stadium and thus impeding the rescue work for the injured. This was also the last Formula One race ever to be held on the full 10 km (6.213 mi) Monza circuit, with the 2 bankings and the straight between the bankings included.

The race was won by von Trips's American teammate Phil Hill, who – since von Trips was the only one who could challenge him – thus won the World Championship with one race to go. Hill's Monza win also assured Ferrari of the Constructors' Championship for 1961.

1961 Naples Grand Prix

The 19th Naples Grand Prix was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 14 May 1961 at Posillipo Circuit, Naples. The race was run over 60 laps of the circuit, and was won by Italian driver Giancarlo Baghetti in a Ferrari 156 in only his second Formula One race, having also won his first. Baghetti went on to win his next Formula One race as well, his first World Championship race, and is the only driver to have achieved this feat.

This race was held on the same day as the 1961 Monaco Grand Prix, therefore very few of the top drivers of the day were in action in Naples. Baghetti took a comfortable victory despite only starting third on the grid, with pole-sitter Gerry Ashmore finishing second after the other main challenger and early leader Roy Salvadori suffered a puncture. Lorenzo Bandini had led for a lap before Baghetti took over on lap 4, and he held the lead until the chequered flag.

1961 Syracuse Grand Prix

The 11th Syracuse Grand Prix was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 25 April 1961 at Syracuse Circuit, Sicily. The race was run over 56 laps of the circuit, and was won by Italian driver Giancarlo Baghetti in a Ferrari 156 in his first Formula One race, the only driver to achieve this feat. Baghetti went on to win his next two Formula One races, including his first World Championship race.

1962 Italian Grand Prix

The 1962 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 16 September 1962. It was race 7 of 9 in both the 1962 World Championship of Drivers and the 1962 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 86-lap race was won by BRM driver Graham Hill after he started from second position. His teammate Richie Ginther finished second and Cooper driver Bruce McLaren came in third.

1962 Mediterranean Grand Prix

The 1st Mediterranean Grand Prix was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 19 August 1962 at the Autodromo di Pergusa, Sicily. The race was run over 50 laps of the circuit, and was dominated by Ferrari. The winner was Lorenzo Bandini in a Ferrari 156.

1964 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1964 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One World Championship motor race held at Zeltweg Airfield on August 23, 1964. It was race 7 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 105-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Lorenzo Bandini after he started from seventh position. Richie Ginther finished second for the BRM team and Brabham driver Bob Anderson came in third. This was the debut World Championship race of the future world champion Jochen Rindt.

1964 British Grand Prix

The 1964 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Brands Hatch on 11 July 1964. The event was also designated as the European Grand Prix. It was race 5 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The first of twelve British Grands Prix to be held at the southern England circuit, it would alternate with Silverstone until 1987. The race was won by Jim Clark driving a Lotus 25.

1964 Daily Mirror Trophy

The 2nd Daily Mirror Trophy was a motor race, run to Formula One rules, held on 14 March 1964 at Snetterton Motor Racing Circuit, England. The race was run over 35 laps of the circuit, and was won by British driver Innes Ireland in a BRP.

The weather conditions for this race were atrocious, with driving sleet and snow, and the length of the race was cut from 50 laps to 35. Three of the favourites were out of contention early in the race, as Jim Clark and Jack Brabham suffered badly from their cars being fitted with smaller wheels than the others, while Graham Hill had an accident on lap 6, aquaplaning into an earth bank while leading. Peter Arundell led from then until lap 22 when his gearbox failed, and after Jo Bonnier led briefly, Ireland took the lead on lap 26 and pulled away to take the victory.

Giancarlo Baghetti was unable to make the start after his car's engine failed while it was being practiced by Phil Hill.

1964 German Grand Prix

The 1964 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nürburgring on 2 August 1964. It was race 6 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 15-lap race was won by Ferrari driver John Surtees after he started from pole position. Graham Hill finished second for the BRM team and Surtees's teammate Lorenzo Bandini came in third. The race was marred by the death of Dutch gentleman racer Carel Godin de Beaufort during practice.

1964 Italian Grand Prix

The 1964 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza on September 6, 1964. It was race 8 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 78-lap race was won by Ferrari driver John Surtees after he started from pole position. Bruce McLaren finished second for the Cooper team and Ferrari driver Lorenzo Bandini came in third.

1995 in motorsport

The following is an overview of the events of 1995 in motorsport including the major racing events, motorsport venues that were opened and closed during a year, championships and non-championship events that were established and disestablished in a year, births and deaths of racing drivers and other motorsport people.

Automobili Turismo e Sport

ATS (Automobili Turismo e Sport) is an Italian automotive constructor. It once had a racing team that operated between 1963 and 1965, formed after the famous "Palace Revolution" at Ferrari.

Ferrari 156 F1

The Ferrari 156 was a racing car made by Ferrari in 1961 to comply with then-new Formula One regulations that reduced engine displacement from 2.5- to 1.5-litres, similar to the pre-1961 Formula Two class for which Ferrari had developed a mid-engined car also called 156 F2.

Phil Hill won the 1961 World Championship of Drivers and Ferrari secured the 1961 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, both victories achieved with the 156.

Ferrari 268 SP

The Ferrari 268 SP is a racing car produced by Ferrari in 1962.

Rob Walker Racing Team

Rob Walker Racing Team was a privateer team in Formula One during the 1950s and 1960s. Founded by Johnnie Walker heir Rob Walker (1917-2002) in 1953, the team became F1's most successful privateer in history, being the first and (along with Giancarlo Baghetti´s team FISA) only entrant to win a World Championship Formula One Grand Prix without ever building their own car.

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