German Football Association

The German Football Association (German: Deutscher Fußball-Bund [ˈdɔʏ̯t͡ʃɐ ˈfuːsbalbʊnt]; DFB [deːʔɛfˈbeː]) is the governing body of football in Germany. A founding member of both FIFA and UEFA, the DFB has jurisdiction for the German football league system and is in charge of the men's and women's national teams. The DFB headquarters are in Frankfurt am Main. Sole members of the DFB are the German Football League (German: Deutsche Fußball Liga; DFL), organising the professional Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga, along with five regional and 21 state associations, organising the semi-professional and amateur levels. The 21 state associations of the DFB have a combined number of more than 25,000 clubs with more than 6.8 million members, making the DFB the single largest sports federation in the world.

German Football Association
UEFA
Deutscher Fußball-Bund logo
Founded28 January 1900
HeadquartersFrankfurt am Main
FIFA affiliation1904
UEFA affiliation1954
PresidentRainer Koch
Reinhard Rauball
(acting)
Websitedfb.de

History

DFB-Logo 1900
First logo of the DFB from 1900 to 1926
German Football Association logo (1911)
Individual logo from 1911
DFB-Logo 1945
Logo from 1926 to 1995
German Football Association logo (1995)
Logo from 1995 to 2003
DFBTriangles
Logo from 2003 to 2008
Deutscher Fußball-Bund logo
Logo since 2008

1875 to 1900

From 1875 to the mid-1880s, the first kind of football played in Germany was according to rugby rules. Later, association-style football teams formed separate clubs, and since 1890, they began to organise on regional and national levels.

1900 to 1933

The DFB (Deutscher Fußball-Bund) was founded on 28 January 1900 in Leipzig by representatives of 86 clubs. The vote held to establish the association was 62:22 in favour (84 votes). Some delegates present represented more than one club, but may have voted only once. Other delegates present did not carry their club's authority to cast a ballot. The DFB consolidated the large number of state-based German regional competitions in play for a single recognized national title for the season 1902/03. Germans were not present in Paris when FIFA was founded by seven nations in May 1904, but by the time the FIFA statutes came into effect on 1 September, Germany had also joined by telegram as the eighth nation. The German national team played its first game in 1908.

Before 1914, the German Empire was much larger than today's Germany, comprising Alsace-Lorraine and the eastern provinces. The borders of the regional associations were drawn according to suitable railway connections. Also, teams based in Bohemia, then part of Austria-Hungary, were eligible, as they were German Football clubs and thus considered German. Thus, a German team from Prague was runner-up in the German championship. On the other hand, clubs of the Danish minority in Northern Schleswig refused to join the DFB. This area after World War I voted to join Denmark. Due to border changes imposed by the Treaty of Versailles, the DFB had to adapt its structure. The Saarland, Danzig, and the Memelland were detached from Germany and East Prussia was cut off from the main part by the Polish Corridor.

1933 to 1945

The role of DFB and its representatives like Felix Linnemann under Nazi Germany was documented in 100 Jahre DFB and by Nils Havemann in Fußball unterm Hakenkreuz.[1] According to Gleichschaltung policy, the DFB, with its large membership from all political sides, and strong regional structures compared to weak national ones, submitted to new rulers and new Gau structures. On a short general meeting on 9 July 1933 in Berlin, the DFB did so, at least formally.

Later, the Hitler salute was made compulsory; Marxists and Jews were expelled. The records of German Jews were erased from the DFD's records, such as those of Gottfried Fuchs who had scored a world record 10 goals for Germany in a 16–0 win against Russia at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, becoming the top scorer of the tournament and setting an international record.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8] When, in 1972, German former player and national team coach Sepp Herberger asked the German Football Association vice president Hermann Neuberger to invite Fuchs as a guest or a guest of honour to an international against Russia on the 60th anniversary of Fuchs' performance for the German team, the DFB Executive Committee declined to do so, writing that it wasn’t willing to invite Fuchs because it would have created an unfortunate precedent (as was pointed out, given that Fuchs was the last remaining former Jewish German international, the DFB’s concern about creating a precedent was a difficult one to understand).[8][9] As of 2016, Fuchs was still the top German scorer for one match.[6]

A new organization, Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen (German Reich League for Physical Exercise), was established and Linnemann was appointed leader of its Fachamt Fußball (Football section), which took over the operational affairs, whereas the DFB lost most of its duties until it was formally dissolved in 1940.

On the pitch, Germany had done well in 1934, but after a 0–2 loss in the 1936 Summer Olympics, with Adolf Hitler attending, the DFB and football fell from grace. Reichsjugendführer Baldur von Schirach and the Hitler Youth took over youth football (under 16) from the clubs following a deal with Reichssportführer Hans von Tschammer und Osten, who had been in charge of all sports in Germany since 1933, making DFB officials even more powerless. Germany had made a bid to host the 1938 World Cup, but it was withdrawn without comment.

Following the Anschluss in March 1938 that made Austria part of Germany, the Austrian Football Association became part of the German federation. New coach Sepp Herberger was told on short notice to use also Austrian players in his team, which was eliminated in the first round of the World Cup, weakening the situation of football within Nazi politics to near meaninglessness. Four Germans (Hans Jakob, Albin Kitzinger, Ludwig Goldbrunner, and Ernst Lehner) represented West Europe in a FIFA friendly on 20 June 1937 in Amsterdam, and another two (Kitzinger again and Anderl Kupfer) represented a FIFA continental team on 26 October 1938 in London, England. During the war, Germany played international games until 1942.

1945 to 1963

In the aftermath of World War II, German organisations were disbanded by the allies. FIFA decided in November 1945 to ban the no longer existing DFB (and Japan's football association) from international competition, while the Austrian association was re-founded. Internationally, Germans were still represented, with Zürich-based Ivo Schricker serving as General Secretary of FIFA from 1932 to December 1950. In 1948, Switzerland requested FIFA to lift the ban on games against Germans, but this was denied. Swiss clubs played German clubs anyway, but had to cease doing so due to international protests. This was only changed in 1949 when The Football Association requested FIFA to lift the ban on club games. FIFA did so on 7 May 1949, two weeks before the Federal Republic of Germany was founded, thus games required permission by the military governments of the time.

Due to partition into several occupation zones, and states, the DFB was legally re-founded in Stuttgart on 21 January 1950 only by the West German regional associations, without the Saarland Football Association in the French occupied Saarland, which on 12 June 1950 would be recognized by FIFA as the first of three German FAs after the war. At the FIFA congress held on 22 June prior to the 1950 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, the Swiss Football Association requested that the DFB be reinstated with full FIFA membership, which was granted on 22 September 1950[10] in Bruxelles. Thus, Germany was excluded from the 1950 FIFA World Cup and could resume international games only in late 1950.

In the early years of the division of Germany, West Germany claimed exclusive mandate of all of Germany. Unlike the IOC, which granted only provisional recognition to the East Germans in 1955, demanding they participate in an All-German Olympic team (United Team of Germany), FIFA fully recognized the East German Football Association in 1952. Winning the 1954 World Cup was a major success for the DFB, and the popularity of the sport in Germany.

The teams of the DFB and the Saarland were squared off in the qualifiers for the 1954 World Cup before the Saarland and its FA was permitted to rejoin Germany and the DFB in 1956.

1963 to present

Due to that success, and due to regional associations fearing to lose influence, the old amateur structure, in which five regional leagues represented the top level, remained in effect longer than in many other countries, even though a Reichsliga had been proposed decades ago. Also, professionalism was rejected, and players who played abroad were considered "mercenaries" and not capped (perhaps most famously Bert Trautmann). The conservative attitude changed only after disappointing results in the 1962 FIFA World Cup when officials like the 75-year-old Peco Bauwens retired. According to the proposals of Hermann Neuberger, the DFB finally introduced a single nationwide professional league, the Bundesliga, for the 1963–64 season.

The DFB has hosted the World Cup in 1974 and 2006. Germany also hosted the 1988 European Championship. Upon reunification in 1990, the East German Deutscher Fußball-Verband der DDR (DFV) was absorbed into the DFB.

The national team won the World Cup for a second time in 1974, a third time in 1990, and a fourth in the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Also, they were crowned European champions three times, in 1972, in 1980 and in 1996. On top, the Mannschaft were runners-up in the 1966, 1982, 1986 and 2002 World Cups and in 1976, 1992 and 2008 European Championships.

The DFB has also overseen the rise of Germany as a world power in women's football. The national team has won World Cups in 2003 and 2007—the latter without conceding a goal in the final tournament, making them the only World Cup champions for men or women to do so. Furthermore, the women's national team's victory in 2003 made Germany the only nation to have won both the Men's and Women's World Cups. They have also won eight UEFA Women's Championships, including the last six in succession.

In 1990, mere months before reunification became official, the DFB founded the women's Bundesliga (Frauen-Bundesliga), directly modelled after the men's Bundesliga. Initially, it was played in north and south divisions but became a single league in 1997. Bundesliga teams have enjoyed more success in the UEFA Women's Champions League than those from any other nation; four different clubs have won a total of seven titles, with the most recent being 2015 champions 1. FFC Frankfurt.

Germany will host UEFA Euro 2024. [11]

Structure

Members

Direct members of the DFB are only its five regional associations and its 21 state associations, along with the German Football League, whereas the clubs participating in the German football league system are members of the state associations covering their district. Today, more than 25,000 clubs are organised in those state associations, fielding nearly 170,000 teams with over two million active players and totalling over six million members, the largest membership of any single sports federation in the world. The Association governs 870,000 female members and 8,600 female teams.

Regional and state associations

Karte-DFB-Regionalverbände
DFB, its five regional and 21 state associations
DFB-Marke
100 year commemorative stamp from 2000

The DFB is organised into five regional associations, which themselves are sub-divided into 21 state associations. These associations typically have their boundaries run along the borders of the German states, with the exception of some states (North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate and Baden-Württemberg) having up to three state associations covering different areas of such state.

Southern Germany

The Southern German Football Association (German: Süddeutscher Fußball-Verband; SFV) covers the states of Baden-Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse. The SFV, formed on 17 October 1897 under the name of Verband Süddeutscher Fußball-Vereine, originally administered the Southern German football championship, until it was dissolved by the Nazis in 1933. Reformed in the American occupation zone after the Second World War, it operated the Oberliga Süd, the regional division of the former lop level German Oberliga until the introduction of the Bundesliga in 1963. Since the 2012–13 season, the SFV, except its member Bavarian FA, along with the Football Association of the Southwest is in charge of the Regionalliga Südwest, a step 4 division in the German football league system. The SFV itself is formed by the following state associations:[12]

Southwestern Germany

The Southwestern Regional Football Association (German: Fußball-Regional-Verband Südwest; FRVS) covers the states Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland and was formed after the Second World War in the French occupation zone in Germany. Its highest league until the introduction of the Bundesliga in 1963 was the Oberliga Südwest, the regional division of the former lop level German Oberliga. Since the 2012-13 season, the FRVS, along with the Southern German football association is in charge of Regionalliga Südwest, a step 4 division in the German football league system. Additionally, the FRVS administrates the Oberliga Rheinland-Pfalz/Saar, a step 5 division. The FRVS itself is formed by the following state associations:[13]

Western Germany

The Western German Football Association (German: Westdeutscher Fußballverband; WDFV) covers the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The association was known as WFLV from 2002 to 2016 and used to administer the Western German football championship until 1933. From 1947 to 1963, its highest league was the Oberliga West, the regional division of the former lop level German Oberliga. Since the 2008-09 season, the WDFV is in charge of the Regionalliga West, a step 4 division in the German football league system. The WDFV itself is formed by the following state associations:[14]

Northern Germany

The Northern German Football Association (German: Norddeutscher Fußball-Verband; NFV) covers the states of Bremen, Hamburg, Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein. The association used to administer the Northern German football championship until 1933. From 1947 to 1963, its highest league was the Oberliga Nord, the regional division of the former lop level German Oberliga. Since the 1994-95 season, the NFV is in charge of the Regionalliga Nord, a step 4 division in the German football league system. The NFV itself is formed by the following state associations:[15]

Northeastern Germany

The Northeastern German Football Association (German: Nordostdeutscher Fußball-Verband; NOFV) covers the states of Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia. The association is the youngest of the five regional associations, having been formed after German reunification in 1990 as a successor of the disbanded German Football Association of the GDR. Since the 2012-13 season and previously from 1994 to 2000, the NOFV administers the Regionalliga Nordost, a step 4 division in the German football league system, and the step 5 Oberliga Nordost. The NOFV itself is formed by the following state associations:[16]

Presidents

Reinhard Grindel
DFB President Reinhard Grindel

Mascot

The official mascot is an eagle with black feathers and yellow beak called "Paule" (since 26 March 2006).

See also

References

  1. ^ Nils Havemann Fußball unterm Hakenkreuz. Der DFB zwischen Sport, Politik und Kommerz Bonn: Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, 2006
  2. ^ "War, Auschwitz, and the Tragic Tale of Germany's Jewish Soccer Hero" - VICE Sports
  3. ^ Phone Home Berlin: Collected Non-Fiction - Nigel Cox
  4. ^ Reyes, Macario (26 June 2008). "V. Olympiad Stockholm 1912 Football Tournament". RSSSF. Retrieved 30 December 2013.
  5. ^ Soccer under the Swastika: Stories of Survival and Resistance during the ... - Kevin E. Simpson
  6. ^ a b Gottfried Fuchs Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at Sports-Reference.com
  7. ^ Does Your Rabbi Know You're Here?: The Story of English Football's Forgotten ... - Anthony Clavane
  8. ^ a b "Snapshot – Sepp Herberger tries to invite Gottfried Fuchs"
  9. ^ "Jüdische Sportstars: Gottfried Fuchs"
  10. ^ DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. – Die DFB-Geschichte
  11. ^ "Euro 2024: Germany beats Turkey to host tournament". BBC News. 27 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  12. ^ Southern German Football Association website ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 17 July 2012
  13. ^ Southwestern German Football Association website ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 17 July 2012
  14. ^ Western German Football Association website ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 17 July 2012
  15. ^ Northern German Football Association website ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 17 July 2012
  16. ^ North Eastern German Football Association website ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 17 July 2012

External links

2015–16 DFB-Pokal

The 2015–16 DFB-Pokal was the 73rd season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. It began on 7 August 2015 with the first of six rounds and ended on 21 May 2016 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions were Bundesliga side VfL Wolfsburg, after they beat Borussia Dortmund 3–1 in the previous final on 30 May 2015. They were knocked out of the competition in the second round by record title-holders Bayern Munich, losing 1–3.The winner of the DFB-Pokal earns automatic qualification to the 2016–17 UEFA Europa League group stages. However, as Bayern Munich already qualified for the UEFA Champions League via their league position, Mainz 05, the sixth placed team in the 2015–16 Bundesliga took this Europa League place, and Mainz's Europa League third qualifying round spot went to Hertha BSC. As Bayern Munich won the Bundesliga and DFB-Pokal, completing a double, Borussia Dortmund, the runners-up of the Bundesliga will host the 2016 DFL-Supercup.

Bayern Munich won the final against Borussia Dortmund 4–3 on penalties, as the match finished 0–0 after extra time, to win their eighteenth title.

2017 DFB-Pokal Final

The 2017 DFB-Pokal Final decided the winner of the 2016–17 DFB-Pokal, the 74th season of the annual German football cup competition. The match was played on 27 May 2017 at the Olympiastadion in Berlin.Eintracht Frankfurt, in their first final since 2006, faced Borussia Dortmund, the runners-up in the previous three finals. Borussia Dortmund won the match 2–1 to claim their fourth cup title.The winners, Borussia Dortmund, will host the 2017 edition of the DFL-Supercup at the start of the next season, and will face the champions of the 2016–17 edition of the Bundesliga, Bayern Munich. The winner of the DFB-Pokal also earns automatic qualification for the group stage of the 2017–18 edition of the UEFA Europa League, but since Borussia Dortmund already qualified for the 2017–18 edition of the UEFA Champions League through position in the Bundesliga, the group stage spot went to the team in sixth, Hertha BSC, and the league's third qualifying round spot to the team in seventh, SC Freiburg.

2017–18 DFB-Pokal

The 2017–18 DFB-Pokal was the 75th season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. The competition began on 11 August 2017 with the first of six rounds and ended on 19 May 2018 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions were Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund, after they defeated Eintracht Frankfurt 2–1 in the previous final. Dortmund were knocked out of the competition in the round of 16 by record winners Bayern Munich, losing 1–2.Eintracht Frankfurt defeated Bayern Munich 3–1 in the final to claim their fifth title.

As winners, Eintracht Frankfurt automatically qualified for the group stage of the 2018–19 edition of the UEFA Europa League. They also will host the 2018 edition of the DFL-Supercup at the start of the next season, and will face the champion of the 2017–18 Bundesliga, Bayern Munich.

2018–19 DFB-Pokal

The 2018–19 DFB-Pokal was the 76th season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. The competition began on 17 August 2018 with the first of six rounds and ended on 25 May 2019 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions were Bundesliga side Eintracht Frankfurt, after they defeated Bayern Munich 3–1 in the previous final. Frankfurt were knocked out of the competition in the first round by fourth-division side SSV Ulm, losing 1–2.

Bayern Munich won the final 3–0 against RB Leipzig for their 19th title. With the win, Bayern completed their 12th domestic double, and therefore will play away to 2018–19 Bundesliga runners-up Borussia Dortmund in the 2019 DFL-Supercup in August 2019. Because Bayern qualified for the Champions League through the Bundesliga, the sixth-place team in the Bundesliga, VfL Wolfsburg, earned qualification for the group stage of the 2019–20 edition of the UEFA Europa League, and the league's third second round spot went to the team in seventh, Eintracht Frankfurt.

2018–19 DFB-Pokal Frauen

The 2018–19 DFB-Pokal was the 39th season of the annual German football cup competition. Fifty teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Frauen-Bundesliga and the 2. Frauen-Bundesliga, excluding second teams. The competition began on 11 August 2018 with the first of six rounds and ended on 1 May 2019 with the final at the RheinEnergieStadion in Cologne, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 2010. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German women's football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions were Frauen-Bundesliga side VfL Wolfsburg, after they defeated Bayern Munich 3–2 on penalties in the previous final.They successfully defended their title after a 1–0 victoy over SC Freiburg.

2019–20 DFB-Pokal

The 2019–20 DFB-Pokal will be the 77th season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams will participate in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and 2. Bundesliga. The competition will begin on 9 August 2019 with the first of six rounds and will end on 23 May 2020 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The defending champions are Bundesliga side Bayern Munich, after they defeated RB Leipzig 3–0 in the previous final.

The winner of the DFB-Pokal earns automatic qualification for the group stage of the 2020–21 edition of the UEFA Europa League. If they have already qualified for the UEFA Champions League through position in the Bundesliga, then the spot will go to the team in sixth, and the league's second qualifying round spot will go to the team in seventh. The winner also will host the 2020 edition of the DFL-Supercup at the start of the next season, and will face the champion of the 2019–20 Bundesliga.

Christian Dingert

Christian Dingert (born 14 July 1980) is a German football referee who is based in Lebecksmühle. He referees for TSG Burg Lichtenberg of the Southwest German Football Association. He is a FIFA referee, and is ranked as a UEFA second group referee.

DFB-Pokal

The DFB-Pokal [ˈdeː ʔɛf beː poˈkaːl] (until 1943 Tschammer-Pokal [tʃaːmɐ poˈkaːl]) (English: German Cup) is a German knockout football cup competition held annually by the Deutscher Fußball-Bund (DFB) (English: German Football Association). Sixty-four teams participate in the competition, including all clubs from the Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. It is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. Taking place from August until June, the winner qualifies for the DFL-Supercup and the UEFA Europa League unless the winner already qualifies for the UEFA Champions League in the Bundesliga.

The competition was founded in 1935, then called the Tschammer-Pokal. The first titleholder were 1. FC Nürnberg. In 1937, Schalke 04 were the first team to win the double. The Tschammer-Pokal was suspended in 1944 due to World War II and disbanded following the demise of Nazi Germany. In 1952–53, the cup was reinstated in West Germany as the DFB-Pokal, named after the DFB, and was won by Rot-Weiss Essen. (FDGB-Pokal, the East German equivalent, started in 1949 and operated through the 1991 season, when it merged with the DFB-Pokal.)

Bayern Munich have won the most titles with 19 wins, while they are also the current title holders. Fortuna Düsseldorf hold the record for most consecutive tournament game wins (18) between 1978 and 1981, winning the cup in 1979 and 1980.

Deutscher Fußball-Verband der DDR

The Deutscher Fußball-Verband der DDR (DFV) was from 1958 the football association of the (East) German Democratic Republic, fielding the East Germany national football team until 1990 before rejoining its counterpart, the German Football Association (DFB), which had been founded in 1900.

The DFV was dissolved on 20 November 1990 in Leipzig and in its place the North East German Football Association was formed and joined the German Football Association on the same day and at the same location, a few weeks after East Germany itself had ceased to exist with the German reunification on 3 October 1990.

Football in Germany

Football is the most popular sport in Germany. The German Football Association (German: Deutscher Fußball-Bund or DFB) is the sport's national governing body, with 6.6 million members (roughly eight percent of the population) organized in over 26,000 football clubs. There is a league system, with the Bundesliga, 2. Bundesliga and 3. Liga on top. The winner of the Bundesliga is crowned the German football champion. Additionally, there are national cup competitions, most notably the DFB-Pokal (German Cup) and DFL-Supercup (German Supercup).The Germany national football team has won four FIFA World Cups (1954, 1974, 1990, 2014), being the joint second most successful nation in the tournament only surpassed by Brazil. It also holds a record (tied with Spain) three UEFA European Championships (1972, 1980, 1996), and won the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2017. The Germany women's national football team has won two FIFA Women's World Cups (2003, 2007) and a record eight UEFA European Women's Championships (1989, 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013), as well as a gold medal in the Summer Olympics in 2016. Germany is the only nation that has won both the men's and women's World Cup. No team has more combined men's and women's World Cup championships, and only the United States has won more combined men's and women's regional/continental championships (USA 12 in CONCACAF, Germany 11 in UEFA Euro). Germany was the host of the 1974 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro 1988, the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup and the 2006 FIFA World Cup and the 1989 UEFA European Women's Championship, 1995 UEFA European Women's Championship, 2001 UEFA European Women's Championship, and 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. Germany will host the UEFA Euro 2024 after beating out rival Turkey by 8 votes of 12-4.

Frauen-Bundesliga

The Frauen-Bundesliga (English: Women's Federal League), currently known as the Allianz Frauen-Bundesliga due to sponsorship by Allianz, is the top level of league competition for women's association football in Germany. In 1990 the German Football Association (DFB) created the German Women's Bundesliga, based on the model of the men's Bundesliga. It was first played with north and south divisions, but in 1997 the groups were merged to form a uniform league. The league currently consists of twelve teams and the seasons usually last from late summer to the end of spring with a break in the winter.

In the UEFA Women's Champions League, the Frauen-Bundesliga is the most successful league with a total of nine titles from four clubs, with 1. FFC Frankfurt winning the most titles of any club.

Fritz Walter Medal

The Fritz Walter Medal is a series of annual awards given by the German Football Association to youth footballers in Germany. First awarded in 2005, it is named in honour of Fritz Walter, captain of West Germany's 1954 FIFA World Cup-winning team.

German football league system

The German football league system, or league pyramid, refers to the hierarchically interconnected league system for association football in Germany that in the 2016–17 season consists of 2,235 divisions having 31,645 teams, in which all divisions are bound together by the principle of promotion and relegation. The top three professional levels contain one division each. Below this, the semi-professional and amateur levels have progressively more parallel divisions, which each cover progressively smaller geographic areas. Teams that finish at the top of their division at the end of each season can rise higher in the pyramid, while those that finish at the bottom find themselves sinking further down. In theory it is possible for even the lowest local amateur club to rise to the top of the system and become German football champions one day. The number of teams promoted and relegated between the divisions varies, and promotion to the upper levels of the pyramid is usually contingent on meeting additional criteria, especially concerning appropriate facilities and finances.

Northeastern German Football Association

The Northeastern German Football Association (German: Nordostdeutscher Fussballverband), the NOFV, is one of five regional organisations of the German Football Association, the DFB, and covers the states of Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.

Northern German Football Association

The Northern German Football Association (German: Norddeutscher Fußball-Verband; NFV) is one of the five regional associations of the German Football Association (German: Deutscher Fußball-Bund; DFB) and covers the four German states of Bremen, Hamburg, Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein.

Saarland Football Association

The Saarland Football Association (German: Saarländischer Fussball-Verband), the SFV, is one of 21 state organisations of the German Football Association, the DFB, and covers the state of Saarland.The SFV is also part of the Southwestern Regional Football Association, one of five regional federations in Germany. The other member of the regional association are the Southwest German Football Association and the Rhineland Football Association.In 2017, the SFV had 97,954 members, 370 member clubs and 2,276 teams playing in its league system.

Southern German Football Association

The Southern German Football Association (German: Süddeutscher Fussball-Verband), the SFV, is one of five regional organisations of the German Football Association, the DFB, and covers the states of Baden-Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse.The SFV is in turn subdivided into the Baden Football Association, Bavarian Football Association, Hessian Football Association, South Baden Football Association and Württemberg Football Association.In 2017, the SFV had 3,113,899 members, 9,809 member clubs and 60,929 teams playing in its league system.

Southwest German Football Association

The South West German Football Association (German: Südwestdeutscher Fussball-Verband), the SWFV, is one of 21 state organisations of the German Football Association, the DFB, and covers the southern part of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate.

The SWFV is also part of the Southwestern Regional Football Association, one of five regional federations in Germany. The other member of the regional association are the Rhineland Football Association and the Saarland Football Association.In 2017, the SWFV had 234,322 members, 1,036 member clubs and 5,371 teams playing in its league system.

Western German Football Association

The Western German Football Association (German: Westdeutscher Fußballverband; WDFV) is one of the five regional associations of the German Football Association (German: Deutscher Fußball-Bund; DFB) and covers German state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

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Other IOC Recognised Sports
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