Georgian military ranks

This is a list of ranks and insignias currently in use by the Defense Forces of Georgia.[1]

Officers

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
Georgia (country) Georgia
(Edit)
No equivalent Georgia-Army-OF-9.svg Georgia-Army-OF-8.svg Georgia-Army-OF-7.svg Georgia-Army-OF-6.svg Georgia-Army-OF-5.svg Georgia-Army-OF-4.svg Georgia-Army-OF-3.svg Georgia Army OF-3.png Georgia Army OF-1c.png Georgia Army OF-1b.png Georgia Army OF-1a.png No equivalent
General
(გენერალი)
Lieutenant General
(გენერალ ლეიტენანტი)
Major General
(გენერალ მაიორი)
Brigadier General
(ბრიგადის გენერალი)
Colonel
(პოლკოვნიკი)
Lieutenant Colonel
(ლეიტენანტ პოლკოვნიკი)
Major
(მაიორი)
Captain
(კაპიტანი)
Senior Lieutenant
(უფროსი ლეიტენანტი)
Lieutenant
(ლეიტენანტი)
Junior Lieutenant
(უმცროსი ლეიტენანტი)
Georgia (country) Georgia
(Edit)
No equivalent Georgia Air Force OF-10.png Georgia Air Force OF-9.png Georgia Air Force OF-8.png Georgia Air Force OF-7.png Georgia Air Force OF-6.png Georgia Air Force OF-5.png Georgia Air Force OF-4.png Georgia Air Force OF-3.png Georgia Air Force OF-2.png Georgia Air Force OF-1b.png Georgia Air Force OF-1a.png Unknown
General
(გენერალი)
Lieutenant General
(გენერალ ლეიტენანტი)
Major General
(გენერალ მაიორი)
Brigadier General
(ბრიგადის გენერალი)
Colonel
(პოლკოვნიკი)
Lieutenant Colonel
(ლეიტენანტ პოლკოვნიკი)
Major
(მაიორი)
Captain
(კაპიტანი)
Senior Lieutenant
(უფროსი ლეიტენანტი)
Lieutenant
(ლეიტენანტი)
Junior Lieutenant
(უმცროსი ლეიტენანტი)
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

Enlisted

The rank insignia for enlisted personnel for the army and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Georgia (country) Georgia
(Edit)
Georgia-Army-OR-9b.svg Georgia-Army-OR-9a.svg Georgia-Army-OR-8.svg Georgia-Army-OR-7.svg Georgia-Army-OR-6.svg Georgia-Army-OR-5.svg Georgia-Army-OR-4b.svg Georgia-Army-OR-4a.svg Georgia-Army-OR-3.svg Georgia-Army-OR-2.svg No insignia
Command sergeant major
მთავარი სერჟანტი
Sergeant major
ბრიგადის სერჟანტი
Battalion master sergeant
ბატალიონის სერჟანტი
Master sergeant
მასტერ სერჟანტი
Staff sergeant
უფროსი სერჟანტი
Sergeant
სერჟანტი
Junior Sergeant
უმცროსი სერჟანტი
Corporal
კაპრალი
Lance Corporal 1st Class
პირველი კლასის ეფრეიტორი
Lance Corporal 2nd Class
მე–2 კლასის ეფრეიტორი
Private
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

References

  1. ^ "Military Ranks and Insignia". mod.gov.ge (in Georgian). Ministry of Defense of Georgia. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
Amirspasalar

Amirspasalar or amirspasalari (Georgian: ამირსპასალარი, from Persian: امیر سپه سالار‎, amīr sipahsālār) was the commander-in-chief of the medieval Georgian army and one of the highest officials of the Kingdom of Georgia, commonly rendered as "Lord High Constable" (and sometimes also as generalissimo) in English. It is composed of amir, an Arabic term meaning "commander", "governor", or "prince"; and sipahsalar, from the Persian for "army commander".The amirspasalar was a wartime supreme commander-in-chief of the royal armies, and the bearer of the state flag. Under Queen Tamar (r. 1184-1213), it was the third great, after the atabek, office of the Georgian state. The Institution of the Royal Court, most probably codified during the second reign of George V (1314-1346) defines the office as "an honorary vizier and the head of army".

The title of amirspasalar is first mentioned in the reign of George III of Georgia (1156-1184), but it was apparently introduced by George’s grandfather David IV (r. 1089-1125), who had substantially reformed Georgia’s military and civil administration. In the early 12th century the amirspasalar was chosen from the House of Orbeli, but in 1155, David, son of Demetrius I of Georgia, overthrow his father and attempted to curb the Orbeli influence by transferring the post to their rival, Tirkash Abuletisdze. After Demetrius’s restoration, the Orbeli again held the post down to their rebellion against George III in 1176/7, when it was given to Qubasar, of Kipchak origin. In 1184, Queen Tamar removed Qubasar and appointed a member of the Gamrekeli family. Later, the office passed to the family of Zachariads (Mkhargrdzeli), succeeded by the Jaqeli.The position was effectively abolished with the dismemberment of the Kingdom of Georgia later in the 15th century.

Bidaxsh

Bidaxsh (also spelled Pitiakhsh), was a title of Iranian origin attested in various languages from the 1th to the 8th-century. The title was prominent in Armenia and Georgia, being used by the military governor of a province, and being the hereditary title of the dynasts of Gugark.

Defense Forces of Georgia

The Defense Forces of Georgia (Georgian: საქართველოს თავდაცვის ძალები, translit.: sakartvelos tavdatsvis dzalebi), or Georgian Defense Forces, known as the Georgian Armed Forces (Georgian: საქართველოს შეიარაღებული ძალები, translit.: sakartvelos sheiaraghebuli dzalebi) until December 2018, are the combined military forces of Georgia, tasked with the defense of the nation’s independence, sovereignty, and territorial integrity. They consist of the Land Force, Air Force, National Guard, and Special Operations Forces. The Defense Forces are under overall leadership of the Minister of Defense of Georgia and directly headed by the Chief of Defense Forces.

The first regular military was established in the first Georgian Republic in 1918 and was in existence until after the republic's overthrow by the invading Soviet Russian forces in 1921. The modern Georgian military were founded in accordance with the government decree of 24 April 1991. 30 April, the day when the first conscripts were called up for military service in 1991, has been celebrated as the day of the Georgian military forces.The Georgian military have fought in the civil war and separatist conflicts in the 1990s and the Russo-Georgian War of 2008 as well as major international military missions such as in Iraq and Afghanistan. Georgia was one of the first former Soviet republics to join the NATO Partnership for Peace program in 1994 and Individual Partnership Action Plan (IPAP) in 2004 and has sought to bring its military in line with the NATO standards.

List of comparative military ranks

This article is a list of various states' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention NATO reference codes. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below.

Monaspa

The Monaspa or Mona-spa (Georgian: მონასპა; lit. the "army of [military] servants") was an elite unit of the Georgian army, from the 11th to the 12th centuries that performed a dual role of both personal bodyguard and standing army to the Georgian monarchs. The Monaspa was well trained and heavily armed mounted shock cavalry, numbering some 5,000 men (spa, host). It was known for being primarily composed of landless nobles and foreign mercenaries, specifically North Caucasian steppe nomads: Alans, Kasogs and Kipchaks of which approximately 14,000 Kipchak families were settled in Georgia's frontier regions in 1118 and baptized.The "Monaspa" was entirely dependent on the king and had no bonds with the feudal nobility. Monaspa along detachments provided by feudal lords and mercenaries were commanded either by the monarch or an amirspasalar.In 1118, after successful completion of David IV's military reform, a Royal Guard of about 5,000 horsemen was formed. The king personally directed the training and equipment of his troops. The new type of army would stand up better to the Seljuk Turkish military organization, and then go over to a methodical offensive with the aim of expelling the Seljuks first from Georgia and then from the whole Caucasus. During the period of 106 years, the Georgian army (the most crucial and core component was the Monaspa guard) won four great victories over the Seljuk Turks in the battles of Ertsukhi (1104), Didgori (1121), Shamkori (1195) and Basiani (1205). This organisation of the army created by David remained practically unchanged throughout the 12th century.

In the late 12th century most of the Monaspa became feudal landholders and part of new Georgian military aristocracy. After 1184 Monaspa's are not mentioned. Some monaspa members gradually gained prominence at the Georgian royal court and acquired their status during the reign of George II and Queen Tamar: Sargis Mkhargrdzeli, Ivane Mkhargrdzeli, Zakaria Mkhargrdzeli, Apridon, Kubasar etc.

Roki Spa

The Roki Spa (Georgian: როქის სპა) was an army of mercenaries between the 12th and 13th centuries recruited by Georgian monarchs during the wars. The term Roki was adopted from Byzantine Empire — Roga (ῥόγα), that meant cash salary, especially remunerations paid to members of the armed forces and civil service. It was probably formed after the successful military reforms of David IV of Georgia. He made provision for the recruitment of a mercenary army among Alans, Kasogs, Durdzuks, Kipchaks, Kurds, etc. They were armored in Chorasmian style and were headed by Monatukhutsesi (Master of Servants). Their duty was protection of strategic places, such as castles in frontier provinces, where they would be headed by Tsikhistavi (governor of castles).

The number of employees depended on the country's economic ability. The hired mercenaries were sometimes paid with money, sometimes even in nature (shells, fowl, cattle, precious things, weapons, etc.). In order to pay a hired army, the government even impossed special taxes. Between the 12th to 13th centuries, such a tax was called "Sak'ivchak'o". The mercenaries were used by the central authorities against both the foreign enemy, as well as feudal opposition. The mercenary army was never a major military force of Georgian feudal army, it only served as a supportive force.

Spaspet

Spaspet (Georgian: სპასპეტი) was a feudal office in Georgia that originated in ancient Iberia. It is usually translated in English as High Constable.

The institution of spaspet, like its rough equivalent sparapet in neighboring Armenia, was designed under the influence of the Sassanian Persian spahbed, but differed in that it was a non-hereditary rank and included not only military, but also civil functions.According to the medieval Georgian chronicles, the rank of spaspet was introduced by the first king P’arnavaz in the 3rd century BC. At the same time, it served as ex officio duke of Inner Iberia (Shida Kartli), around Mtskheta and Uplis-Tsikhe. It seems that this office was in fact occupied by the member of the Iberian royal family or an especially high dignitary next in seniority to the king. The Roman geographer Strabo (63/4 BC-AD 24) attests that in the royal hierarchy of Iberia "the second in line administers justice and commands the army." It is also possible to equate these dignitaries with the Iberian viceroys (pitiakhsh) whose hereditary necropolis was uncovered in Armazi.The office, in a variously modified manner, survived into medieval and early modern Georgia down to the Russian annexation early in the 19th century.

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