George W. Campbell

George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769 – February 17, 1848) was an American statesman who served as a U.S. Representative, Senator, Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, U.S. Ambassador to Russia and the 5th United States Secretary of the Treasury from February to October 1814.

George Campbell
CAMPBELL, George W-Treasury (BEP engraved portrait)
United States Minister to Russia
In office
February 7, 1819 – July 8, 1820
PresidentJames Monroe
Preceded byWilliam Pinkney
Succeeded byHenry Middleton
United States Senator
from Tennessee
In office
October 10, 1815 – April 20, 1818
Preceded byJoseph Anderson
Succeeded byJohn Eaton
In office
October 8, 1811 – February 11, 1814
Preceded byJenkin Whiteside
Succeeded byJesse Wharton
5th United States Secretary of the Treasury
In office
February 9, 1814 – October 5, 1814
PresidentJames Madison
Preceded byWilliam Jones (Acting)
Succeeded byAlexander Dallas
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1809
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byRobert Weakley
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's at-large district
In office
March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byConstituency abolished
Personal details
Born
George Washington Campbell

February 9, 1769
Tongue, Scotland, Great Britain (now United Kingdom)
DiedFebruary 17, 1848 (aged 79)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic-Republican
Spouse(s)Harriot Stoddert
EducationPrinceton University (BA)

Biography

Born in the village of Tongue on the north coast of Scotland, Campbell immigrated as a young boy to North Carolina in 1772 with his parents. He graduated from the College of New Jersey (which is now Princeton University) in 1794[1] and began studying law. He was admitted to the bar in North Carolina and began practicing in Knoxville, Tennessee.

U.S. House

Campbell was elected to the United States House of Representatives as the Representative from Tennessee's at-large congressional district in 1803. He served in the House from 1805–1809, in the 8th, 9th, and 10th Congresses. During the 10th Congress, he was the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. He was also one of the managers appointed in 1804 to conduct the impeachment hearings for John Pickering, judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire, and later in the same year, the impeachment hearings against Samuel Chase, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

He left Congress in 1809 to become judge of the Tennessee Supreme Court, serving until 1811.

U.S. Senate and ambassadorship

Campbell served as a United States Senator from Tennessee twice, once from 1811 to 1814, having been elected to fill the seat of Jenkin Whiteside, and again from 1815 to 1818. His first service was from October 8, 1811 to February 11, 1814, when he resigned to accept appointment as the United States Secretary of the Treasury. He returned to the Senate on October 10, 1815. He served as the first chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and its predecessor from December 4, 1815, until his resignation from the Senate on April 20, 1818; on this occasion to accept appointment as United States Ambassador to Russia, a position he held from 1818 to 1821. Campbell served as a member of the French Spoliation Claims Commission in 1831.

Secretary of the Treasury

Appointed Secretary of the Treasury by James Madison, Campbell faced national financial disorder brought on by the War of 1812. Congress had failed to recharter the First Bank of the United States after its charter expired in 1811, and appropriations for the war were unavailable, so Campbell had to convince Americans to buy government bonds. He was forced to meet to lenders terms, selling government bonds at exorbitant interest rates. In September, 1814 the British occupied Washington, D.C. and the credit of the government was lowered even further. He was unsuccessful in his efforts to raise money through additional bond sales and he resigned that October after only eight months in office, disillusioned and in bad health.

Campbell died in 1848 and is buried at Nashville City Cemetery in Nashville, Tennessee.

Campbell County, Tennessee, is named in his honor.

See also

References

  1. ^ see Princeton College During the Eighteenth Century
  • United States Congress. "George W. Campbell (id: C000083)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  • Google Books, page 272 for Year 1794

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
New constituency Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's at-large congressional district

1803–1805
Constituency abolished
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 2nd congressional district

1805–1809
Succeeded by
Robert Weakley
Preceded by
Joseph Clay
Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee
1807–1809
Succeeded by
John Eppes
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Jenkin Whiteside
United States Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
1811–1814
Served alongside: Joseph Anderson
Succeeded by
Jesse Wharton
Preceded by
Joseph Anderson
United States Senator (Class 1) from Tennessee
1815–1818
Served alongside: Jesse Wharton, John Williams
Succeeded by
John Eaton
New office Chair of the Senate Finance Committee
1815–1818
Succeeded by
John Eppes
Political offices
Preceded by
Albert Gallatin
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1814
Succeeded by
Alexander Dallas
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William Pinkney
United States Minister to Russia
1819–1820
Succeeded by
Henry Middleton
12th United States Congress

The Twelfth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1811, to March 4, 1813, during the third and fourth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Second Census of the United States in 1800. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

13th United States Congress

The Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1813, to March 4, 1815, during the fifth and sixth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority. The first two sessions were held at the Capitol building while the third, convened after the Burning of Washington, took place in the First Patent Building.

14th United States Congress

The Fourteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in the Old Brick Capitol in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1815, to March 4, 1817, during the seventh and eighth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

15th United States Congress

The Fifteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in the Old Brick Capitol in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1817, to March 4, 1819, during the first two years of James Monroe's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

1801 Tennessee's at-large congressional district special election

William Dickson beat John Reah, George W. Campbell, and John Cocke to begin the 7th Congress in place of William C. C. Claiborne.

1803 United States House of Representatives election in Tennessee

Tennessee increased its apportionment from 1 seat to 3 seats after the 1800 census.

1805 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee

Beginning with the 9th Congress, Tennessee was divided into 3 districts.

1807 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee

Tennessee elected its members August 3–4, 1807, after the Congress began but before the first session met.

Alexander J. Dallas (statesman)

Alexander James Dallas (June 21, 1759 – January 16, 1817) was an American statesman who served as the U.S. Treasury Secretary under President James Madison.

Jenkin Whiteside

Jenkin Whiteside (1772 – September 25, 1822) was an attorney who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee.

Jesse Wharton

Jesse Wharton (July 29, 1782 – July 22, 1833) was an attorney who briefly represented Tennessee in each house of Congress.

John Williams (Tennessee)

John Williams (January 29, 1778 – August 10, 1837) was an American lawyer, soldier, and statesman, operating primarily out of Knoxville, Tennessee, in the first part of the 19th century. He represented Tennessee in the United States Senate from 1815 to 1823, when he lost reelection to Andrew Jackson. Williams also served as colonel of the 39th U.S. Infantry during the Creek Wars, and played a key role in Jackson's victory at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814.Williams later distanced himself from Jackson, and aligned himself with John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay. Adams appointed him chargé d'affaires to the Central American Federation in 1825.

Joseph Anderson

Joseph Inslee Anderson (November 5, 1757 – April 17, 1837) was an American soldier, judge, and politician, who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1799 to 1815, and later as the First Comptroller of the United States Treasury. He also served as one of three judges of the Southwest Territory in the 1790s, and was a delegate to the Tennessee state constitutional convention in 1796.

List of United States Senators from Tennessee

Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796. Its United States Senate seats were declared vacant in March 1862 owing to its secession from the Union. They were again filled from July 1866. Tennessee's current Senators are Republicans Lamar Alexander and Marsha Blackburn.

Robert Weakley

Robert Weakley (July 20, 1764 – February 4, 1845) was an American politician who represented Tennessee in the United States House of Representatives from 1809 to 1811.

USCGC Campbell (WPG-32)

USCGC Campbell (WPG-32) was a 327-foot (100 m) Secretary-class (also known as Treasury-class) United States Coast Guard ship built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1935-1936 and commissioned in 1936. Seven similar "combat cutters" were built and named for secretaries of the United States Treasury.

Campbell was named for George Washington Campbell. She earned the title "Queen of the Seas" during a 46-year career, spanning World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam War.

United States congressional delegations from Tennessee

These are tables of congressional delegations from Tennessee to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

William Pinkney

William Pinkney (March 17, 1764 – February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and was appointed the seventh U.S. Attorney General by President James Madison.

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