George Uhle

George Ernest Uhle (September 18, 1898 – February 26, 1985) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he began his playing career with his hometown Cleveland Indians. After ten seasons, during which time he led the American League in wins, innings pitched, complete games, shutouts, and games started, he was traded in 1928 to the Detroit Tigers for Jackie Tavener and Ken Holloway. He went on to play with the New York Giants, New York Yankees, and again with the Indians. When his career ended in 1936, he had won 200 games. His lifetime batting average of .289 (393-for-1360) is still a record for a pitcher (not playing at any other position)

On May 25, 1929, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago White Sox 6-5 in 21 innings. Uhle, who was the winning pitcher, pitched twenty innings to earn his eighth win of the season with no losses. The losing pitcher, Ted Lyons, pitched all 21 innings for Chicago.

Babe Ruth himself credited George with being the toughest pitcher he ever faced, although Ruth batted .336 against Uhle. Out of 714 career home runs, he got only four off Uhle. Uhle had the second most strikeouts of Ruth by a pitcher, with 25. Only Lefty Grove had more, with 27.

He was buried at Lakewood Park Cemetery in Rocky River, Ohio.

George Uhle
George-Uhle
Pitcher
Born: September 18, 1898
Cleveland, Ohio
Died: February 26, 1985 (aged 86)
Lakewood, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 30, 1919, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 22, 1936, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record200–166
Earned run average3.99
Strikeouts1,135
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1920 Cleveland Indians season

The 1920 Cleveland Indians season was the 20th season in franchise history. The Indians won the American League pennant and proceeded to win their first World Series title in the history of the franchise. Pitchers Jim Bagby, Stan Coveleski and Ray Caldwell combined to win 75 games. Despite the team's success, the season was perhaps more indelibly marked by the death of starting shortstop Ray Chapman, who died after being hit by a pitch on August 17.

1921 Cleveland Indians season

The 1921 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 94–60, 4 games behind the New York Yankees.

1922 Cleveland Indians season

The 1922 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 78–76, 16 games behind the New York Yankees.

1923 Cleveland Indians season

The 1923 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 82–71, 16½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1923 Major League Baseball season

The 1923 Major League Baseball season.

1924 Cleveland Indians season

The 1924 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 67–86, ​24 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1925 Cleveland Indians season

The 1925 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 70–84, ​27 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1926 Cleveland Indians season

The 1926 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 88–66, 3 games behind the New York Yankees.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1927 Cleveland Indians season

The 1927 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 66–87, 43½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1933 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1933 New York Giants season was the franchise's 51st season. The team won the National League pennant and beat the Washington Senators of the American League in the World Series.

1933 New York Yankees season

The 1933 New York Yankees season was the team's 31st season in New York and its 33rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–59, finishing 7 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1936 Cleveland Indians season

The 1936 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 80–74, 22½ games behind the New York Yankees.

Cleveland Indians award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Cleveland Indians professional baseball team.

Earl Whitehill

Earl Oliver Whitehill (February 7, 1899 – October 22, 1954) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Detroit Tigers for the most significant portion of his career (1923–1932), and later with the Washington Senators (1933–1936), Cleveland Indians (1937–1938), and the Chicago Cubs (1939). Consistently winning in double digits for thirteen years (1924–1936), left-handed Whitehill went on to become one of the top winning pitchers of all time. He was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

"The Earl", as many called him, was a handsome and often temperamental pitcher who often showed up in the top 10 in hit batsmen, leading the league in his first full year, 1924, when he hit 13 (tied with George Uhle).

Whitehill averaged 14 wins each season and he never dipped below 11 wins in a full season (30 starts or more). Whitehill made his debut on September 15, 1923. He was a small left-handed pitcher, who weighed around 175 pounds. With Detroit, he came to be known as one of the most consistent pitchers in the league. From 1928 through 1932, he never had an ERA higher than 4.62 and never had one lower than 4.08; a difference of only .54 in those years.

In his rookie season, Whitehill was 17–8, with a 3.86 ERA, and two shutouts. The Tigers' offensive support helped, as the Tigers finished 1st in most major offensive categories in 1923. Reduced run support became a factor later in his stint with Detroit, which lead some to believe his overall record could have been better. In his early years with Detroit, Whitehill was part of a starting rotation that included Hooks Dauss, Dutch Leonard, and Lil Stoner.

Whitehill, one of the top pitchers of the Roaring Twenties, had a celebrity marriage to Violet Geissinger. Geissinger was a model for Sun-Maid Raisins during the 1920s. She was known as The Sun-Maid Raisin Girl.After he was traded to Washington, for Firpo Marberry and Carl Fischer, Whitehill fit right in there, going a career-best 22–8 in his first year, with a 3.33 ERA (also a career-best, excluding his first year when he pitched in 8 games and had a 2.73 ERA). With Washington that year, he saw his first (and last) postseason action, when the Senators were defeated by the New York Giants in 5 games. However, Whitehill did his part, getting the only win of the series for Washington. In that game, he pitched a complete game shutout allowing 5 hits and 2 walks. Because he didn't start until Game 3, it became his only start of the Series, and his only start of the postseason. Thus, his final postseason ERA was 0.00, tied with many others for a record.

He one-hit the St. Louis Browns on July 4, 1932, Goose Goslin recording the only hit for the Browns. Whitehill also one-hit the New York Yankees on May 30, 1934. The Yanks' Ben Chapman broke up the no-hitter in the ninth inning.

He was traded as part of a three team deal on December 10, 1936. The Senators received Jack Salveson from the Chicago White Sox, who received Thornton Lee from the Indians, which is where Whitehill was headed. In Cleveland, Whitehill had two average years and made a number of relief appearances (mostly in 1937). His final record with the Indians was 17–16.

Whitehill signed with the Cubs in 1939, went 4–7 with a 5.14 ERA there, and was released in October 1939. In 17 seasons, he was 218–185 with a career ERA of 4.36, having given up 1726 earned runs in 3564 and 2/3 innings pitched. He recorded 1350 career strikeouts. He pitched in 541 games, 473 of them starts. His lifetime ERA of 4.36 is higher than any other 200-game winner.

A competent hitting pitcher in his 17 years in the majors, Whitehill compiled a .204 batting average (264-for-1291) with 107 runs, 4 home runs and 98 RBI.

After serving as a coach for the Indians, the Philadelphia Phillies, and in the International League in the early 1940s, he became a sales representative for the A. G. Spalding sporting goods firm. Whitehill died in an automobile accident in Omaha, Nebraska at the age of 54.

Harry Coveleski

Harry Frank Coveleski (April 23, 1886 – August 4, 1950) was a Major League Baseball pitcher with the Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds, and Detroit Tigers.

List of Cleveland Indians Opening Day starting pitchers

The Cleveland Indians are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Cleveland, Ohio. They play in the American League Central division. The first game of the new baseball season is played on Opening Day, and being named the starter that day is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Since joining the league in 1901, the Indians have used 58 different Opening Day starting pitchers which includes the Opening Day starting pitchers from the Bluebirds and the Naps. They have a record of 58 wins and 54 losses in their Opening Day games.The Indians have played in three different home ball parks, League Park from 1901 through 1946, Cleveland Stadium from 1932 to 1993, and Progressive Field since 1994. From 1934 through 1946 some games were played at League Park and some at Cleveland Stadium. They had a record of 11 wins and 4 losses in Opening Day games at League Park, 9 wins and 13 losses at Cleveland Stadium and 2 wins and 4 losses at Progressive Field, for a total home record in Opening Day games of 22 wins and 21 losses. Their record in Opening Day away games is 35 wins and 35 losses.Bob Feller has the most Opening Day starts for the Indians, with seven. Stan Coveleski had six Opening Day starts for the Indians, Bob Lemon and CC Sabathia each had five Opening Day starts, and Addie Joss, Willie Mitchell, Gaylord Perry and Charles Nagy each had four. Several Baseball Hall of Famers have made Opening Day starts for the Indians, including Feller, Coveleski, Lemon, Joss, Gaylord Perry, Dennis Eckersley and Early Wynn. Brothers Jim Perry and Gaylord Perry each made Opening Day starts for the Indians. Jim Perry started on Opening Day in 1961 and Gaylord Perry made Opening Day starts in 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1975.The Indians have played in the World Series six times. They won in 1920 and 1948, and lost in 1954, 1995, 1997, and 2016. Coveleski was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1920, Feller in 1948, Wynn in 1954, Dennis Martínez in 1995, Nagy in 1997, and Corey Kluber. The Indians are five and one in Opening Day games in those seasons, with the only loss coming in 2016. The Indians and the Toronto Blue Jays currently hold the record for the longest Opening Day game in Major League history. They set that record on Opening Day 2012, when the game lasted 16 innings. This broke the previous record of 15 innings between the Indians and the Detroit Tigers in 1960.

Slider

In baseball, a slider is a breaking ball pitch that tails laterally and down through the batter's hitting zone; it is thrown with less speed than a fastball but greater than the pitcher's curveball.

The break on the pitch is shorter than that of the curveball, and the release technique is 'between' those of a curveball and a fastball. The slider is similar to the cutter, a fastball pitch, but is more of a breaking ball than the cutter. The slider is also known as a yakker or a snapper.

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