George Sauer

George Henry Sauer (December 11, 1910 – February 5, 1994) was an American football player, coach, college sports administrator, and professional football executive. He played college football as a halfback at the University of Nebraska from 1931 to 1933 and then with the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 1935 to 1937, helping them win the 1936 NFL championship as their starting left halfback. Sauer served as the head football coach at the University of New Hampshire (1937–1941), the University of Kansas (1946–1947), the United States Naval Academy (1948–1949), and Baylor University (1950–1955), compiling a career college football record of 78–55–9. He was also the head basketball coach at New Hampshire for one season in 1938–39, tallying a mark of 3–14. Sauer was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1954.

George Sauer
Sauer from 1934 Cornhusker
Biographical details
BornDecember 11, 1910
Stratton, Nebraska
DiedFebruary 5, 1994 (aged 83)
Waco, Texas
Playing career
1931–1933Nebraska
1935–1937Green Bay Packers
1942Pensacola NAS
Position(s)Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1937–1941New Hampshire
1946–1947Kansas
1948–1949Navy
1950–1955Baylor
Basketball
1938–1939New Hampshire
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1950–1958Baylor
1961New York Titans (GM)
1962–1969New York Titans/Jets (dir. pro pers.)
1969–1970Boston Patriots (GM)
Head coaching record
Overall78–55–9 (football)
3–14 (basketball)
Bowls0–3
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 New England Conference (1937, 1940)
2 Big Six (1946–1947)
Awards
All-American, 1933
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1954 (profile)

Career

Sauer attended the University of Nebraska where he was an All-American halfback under Dana X. Bible. He coached at the University of New Hampshire from 1937 to 1941. Although he only coached two years at Kansas, he compiled a 15–3–2 (.786) record.

Sauer was a World War II veteran, having obtained the rank of lieutenant colonel. He went on to become Baylor's athletic director. He was named general manager of the NFL's New York Titans in 1961 and was director of player personnel from 1962 to 1969. He was also General Manager of the Boston Patriots in 1969 and 1970.

Sauer was the father of American Football League All-League wide receiver George Sauer, Jr. of the New York Jets.

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
New Hampshire Wildcats (New England Conference) (1937–1941)
1937 New Hampshire 7–1 1–0 T–1st
1938 New Hampshire 3–6
1939 New Hampshire 3–5
1940 New Hampshire 5–3 2–0 1st
1941 New Hampshire 4–3–1
New Hampshire: 22–18–1
Kansas Jayhawks (Big Six Conference) (1946–1947)
1946 Kansas 7–2–1 4–1 T–1st
1947 Kansas 8–1–2 4–0–1 T–1st L Orange 12
Kansas: 15–3–3 8–1–1
Navy Midshipmen (Independent) (1948–1949)
1948 Navy 0–8–1
1949 Navy 3–5–1
Navy: 3–13–2
Baylor Bears (Southwest Conference) (1950–1955)
1950 Baylor 7–3 4–2 2nd 15
1951 Baylor 8–2–1 4–1–1 2nd L Orange 9 9
1952 Baylor 4–4–2 1–3–2 5th
1953 Baylor 7–3 4–2 3rd
1954 Baylor 7–4 4–2 T–3rd L Gator 18
1955 Baylor 5–5 2–4 T–5th
Baylor: 38–21–3 19–14–3
Total: 78–55–9
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

External links

1942 Pensacola Naval Air Station Goslings football team

The 1942 Pensacola Naval Air Station Goslings football team represented the Pensacola Naval Air Station during the 1942 college football season. The team compiled a 3–5–1 record and was ranked No. 8 among the service teams in a poll of 91 sports writers conducted by the Associated Press.The team's head coach was Potsy Clark. Notable players included George Sauer, Rep Whalen, Ben McLeod, Jim Birr, and Don Clawson.

1946 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1946 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Six Conference during the 1946 college football season. In their first season under head coach George Sauer, the Jayhawks compiled a 7–2–1 record (4–1 against conference opponents), tied with Oklahoma for the conference championship, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 157 to 145. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

1947 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1947 Kansas Jayhawks football team was an American football team that represented the University of Kansas in the Big Six Conference during the 1947 college football season. In its second and final season under head coach George Sauer, the team compiled an 8–1–2 record (4–0–1 against conference opponents), tied for the conference championship, was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 304 to 102. The team was undefeated in the regular season before losing to Georgia Tech in the 1948 Orange Bowl.On October 11, 1947, the team established a new program scoring record with 86 points against South Dakota State. The total bested the prior record of 83 points scored against Washington University in 1923.Halfback Ray Evans was selected by the Associated Press and Grantland Rice as a first-team player on the 1947 All-America team. He was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Four Kansas players received first-team honors from the United Press on the 1947 All-Big Six Conference football team: Evans; end Otto Schnellbacher; guard Don Fambrough; and halfback Forrest Griffith.The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

1948 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 1948 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy during the 1948 college football season. In their first season under head coach George Sauer, the Midshipmen compiled a 0–8–1 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 227 to 77.

1949 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 1949 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy during the 1949 college football season. In their second season under head coach George Sauer, the Midshipmen compiled a 3–5–1 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined score of 238 to 151.

1965 Orange Bowl

The 1965 Orange Bowl, part of the 1964 bowl season, took place on January 1, 1965, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. It matched the top-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and the #5 Texas Longhorns of the Southwest Conference (SWC). Texas built an early lead and won 21–17.

This was the first Orange Bowl game played at night, and the first live national network telecast of a college football game during prime time. It also was the first Orange Bowl in twelve years not to include a team from the Big Eight Conference.

1969 Boston Patriots season

The 1969 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's 10th and final season in the American Football League The Patriots ended the season with a record of four wins and ten losses, and finished tied for third in the AFL's Eastern Division.

1971 New York Jets season

The 1971 New York Jets season was the twelfth season for the team and the second in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 4–10 record from 1970 under head coach Weeb Ewbank.

Disaster struck before the regular season started and the Jets finished 6–8. Joe Namath was injured in a preseason game against the Detroit Lions and required knee surgery, All-Pro WR George Sauer unexpectedly retired at the peak of his career, and All-Pro defensive end Verlon Biggs exercised his option and signed with the Washington Redskins.

After missing nineteen consecutive Jets games in 1970 and 1971, Namath returned to action against the San Francisco 49ers in the third quarter (November 28, 1971) and threw for 258 yards and three touchdowns, but was intercepted by Johnny Fuller in the end zone on the final play of a 24–21 loss. He then started the final three games, and the Jets won the last two after suffering a 52–10 loss in a nationally televised game to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys.

Butch Cowell

William Harold "Butch" Cowell (July 21, 1887 – August 28, 1940) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball.

Covington Catholic High School

Covington Catholic High School (abbreviated CCH or CovCath) is a private, Roman Catholic high school for boys in Park Hills, Kentucky, United States. It was founded in 1925 by Bishop Francis William Howard and Brother George Sauer and is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington. The school is the only boys' high school in Northern Kentucky and one of five in the Cincinnati area. The girls' Notre Dame Academy is located across the street.

George Sauer Jr.

George Henry Sauer Jr. (November 10, 1943 – May 7, 2013) was an American football wide receiver who played six seasons for the American Football League's New York Jets. He led the AFL in receptions in the 1967 season. In 1968, he started and caught eight passes for the Jets in the third AFL-NFL World Championship Game, helping defeat the NFL's heavily favored Baltimore Colts. He later played for the New York Stars of the World Football League. He also coached a minor league football team in the late 1970s. His father, George Sauer, played for the Green Bay Packers from 1935 through 1937.

While at Texas, Sauer played as a wide receiver, catching passes from quarterback Jim Hudson. After being teammates as Texas, Hudson and Sauer continued as teammates for the New York Jets for five years from 1965 through 1969.

Sauer retired at the peak of his career following the 1970 season because he considered professional football dehumanizing. In a 1971 interview with the Institute for the Study of Sport and Society, Sauer said, "When you get to the college and professional levels, the coaches still treat you as an adolescent. They know damn well that you were never given a chance to become responsible or self-disciplined. Even in the pros, you were told when to go to bed, when to turn your lights off, when to wake up, when to eat and what to eat. You even have to live and eat together like you were in a boys’ camp." Sauer's father, on the subject of his son's retirement, stated, "He definitely does not like to be regimented."In spite of his disillusionment about playing professional football, Sauer returned to play for the New York Stars of the World Football League in 1974. That season Sauer caught 38 passes for 547 yards, good for 14.4 yards per catch and 3 touchdowns.

After retiring, George pursued writing and completed a novel. As of 1994, same year as his dad's death, Sauer was a textbook graphics specialist living in St. Paul. He died on May 7, 2013 in Westerville, Ohio of congestive heart failure, having suffered from Alzheimer's disease.

Gerry Philbin

Gerald John Philbin (born July 31, 1941) is a former American football defensive tackle and four-year starter from the University at Buffalo where he earned several honors including second-team All-American, Little All-America, and All-American Academic team. Drafted by both the Detroit Lions of the National Football League and the New York Jets of the American Football League in the third round of the 1964 draft, he joined the Jets and became an immediate starter and perennial All-AFL selection at defensive end. He played stellar defense for them for nine seasons.

He was selected as an American Football League All-Star in 1968 and 1969. A ferocious pass-rusher, Philbin recorded 14½ sacks of opposing quarterbacks in 1968, helping the Jets win the AFL Championship. In the third AFL-NFL World Championship Game, Philbin anchored the Jets defense in limiting the Colts to seven points.

In 1973, he joined the Philadelphia Eagles for one season and finished his career in the short-lived World Football League as a member of the New York Stars in 1974 where he joined former Super Bowl III alumni George Sauer, Jr, Randy Beverly, John Dockery, John Elliott, and Vito (Babe) Parilli. He was an All-WFL selection in 1974. Philbin is a member of the All-time American Football League Team.

Jules V. Sikes

Jules Verne Sikes (October 22, 1904 – May 20, 1964) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach. He was a graduate of Texas A&M University where he was a three-sport star, lettering three years each in baseball, basketball and football. He played end for Dana X. Bible's Texas A&M football teams from 1925 to 1927 and was All-Southwest Conference and mentioned as All-American. He played minor league baseball with Shreveport, Louisiana of the Class A Texas League after college. Sikes was an assistant coach for ends at the University of Georgia in Wally Butts first year as head football coach in 1939 until leaving for Kansas after the 1947 season, interrupted by service in World War II. He coached the Kansas Jayhawks from 1948 to 1953, compiling a 35–25 record. He succeeded George Sauer who left Kansas for United States Naval Academy. From 1954 to 1963, he coached at East Texas State University, amassing a 63–34–4 record. The Lions won five Lone Star Conference championships during his tenure and won both the Tangerine Bowl twice, at the end of the 1957 and 1958 seasons. He was a proponent of the T formation.

Kozjak Castle

Kozjak Castle (Slovene: Grad Kozjak, German: Schloss Kosieck) is a 13th-century castle ruin on a rocky hill above the village of Dolenje Selce near the town of Dobrnič, part of the Municipality of Trebnje in Lower Carniola, Slovenia.

List of Baylor Bears head football coaches

The Baylor Bears football program is a college football team that represents Baylor University in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team has had 25 head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1899. Baylor was a charter member of the Southwest Conference (SWC), joining in 1915. They later became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the SWC disbanded. After playing without a nickname for 15 years, the school chose Bears as the team nickname in 1914. There were three seasons where Baylor did not field a team. In 1906, the university banned football due to the violent nature of the sport. However, student protests persuaded school officials to reinstate it the next year. In 1943 and 1944, the school cancelled the football program due to World War II. The Bears have played in 1,099 games during their 108 seasons. In those seasons, seven coaches have led Baylor to postseason bowl games: Bob Woodruff, George Sauer, Sam Boyd, John D. Bridgers, Grant Teaff, Chuck Reedy, and Art Briles. Five coaches have won conference championships with the Bears: Charles P. Mosley, Frank Bridges, Teaff, Reedy and Briles.

Teaff is the all-time leader in years coached (21), games coached (239), and wins (128). R. H. Hamilton has the highest winning percentage of any Baylor coach, with a 5–1–1 record (.786) during his two-year tenure. Bill Beall is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Bears have had, winning only 3 of his 31 games (.097). Of the 25 Baylor coaches, 2 have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Teaff and Morley Jennings. Teaff is also the only coach to have received any coach of the year accolades, winning two national coach of the year award in 1974 and the conference coach of the year award twice. The current coach is Matt Rhule, who was hired on December 6, 2016.

List of Kansas Jayhawks head football coaches

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is a college football team that represents the University of Kansas in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The current coach is Les Miles. The team has had 38 head coaches and two interim head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1890 with the nickname Jayhawks. The team played its first season without a head coach. Kansas joined the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. After several changes, the conference eventually became the Big Eight Conference. The Jayhawks became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the Big Eight disbanded. Seven coaches have led Kansas to postseason bowl games: George Sauer, Jack Mitchell, Pepper Rodgers, Don Fambrough, Bud Moore, Glen Mason and Mark Mangino. Four coaches have won conference championships with the Jayhawks: A. R. Kennedy, Bill Hargiss, Sauer and Rodgers.

Mason is the all-time leader in games coached (102), and is tied with Mitchell for most years coached with nine. Kennedy is the all-time leader in total wins with 52. Fielding H. Yost has the highest winning percentage of any Jayhawk coach with a 10–0 record (1.000) his only year. Of coaches who served more than one season, Wylie G. Woodruff leads with a .833 winning percentage, barely edging out Kennedy's winning percentage of .831. Current head coach David Beaty is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Jayhawks have had (.081). Of the 38 Kansas coaches, Yost is the only one that has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach. Mangino won several coach of the year accolades after the 2007 season, the only Jayhawks coach to do so.

List of Navy Midshipmen football seasons

The Navy Midshipmen college football team competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision, representing the United States Naval Academy in the western division of the American Athletic Conference. The Midshipmen have played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland since 1959.

List of Navy Midshipmen head football coaches

The Navy Midshipmen football team has represented the United States Naval Academy in intercollegiate college football since 1879. The team participated as an independent school for the majority of its existence, but joined the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) as an expansion team in 2015. The Midshipmen joined the NCAA Division I-A when it was created in 1978, becoming one of the first independent schools in that division. The program has had 37 head coaches, one interim coach, and two separate periods where it went without a coach since its formation. Since December 2007, Ken Niumatalolo has served as head coach of the Midshipmen.The academy adopted the nickname "Midshipmen" for its students when it was founded in 1845. Between 1870 and 1902, the school tried out a number of different ideas, before Congress restored the name "Midshipmen" as the academy's nickname. The term has been accepted since. The Midshipmen have played in over 1200 games during the program's 133 seasons (through the 2015 regular season). In those seasons, seven coaches have led the Midshipmen to postseason bowl games, ten have been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame, and one, Bill Ingram, has led the school to a recognized national championship.Vaulx Carter, the program's first coach, is the all-time leader in win percentage, with a perfect 1.000. Of coaches who have served in more than one game, Gil Dobie has the highest win percentage with .850 after completing a record of 17–3. George Sauer has the lowest win percentage of any non-interim coach, amassing a percentage of .222 and a record of 3–13–2. George Welsh is the all-time leader in seasons coached at Navy with nine, and also leads in number of games coached (102). Ken Niumatalolo overtook Welsh in 2014, for the most games won at Navy, with 57. In 2014, Niumatalolo overtook Paul Johnson, his predecessor, for the most bowl games coached, with seven, and most number of bowl games won (3).

WFL All-Time Team

The WFL All-Time Team is a list of the top players in the history of the World Football League chosen by fans of the WFL. It includes a First-team, a Second-team. Absent from the team are the high-dollar signees from the National Football League, such as Larry Csonka, Paul Warfield, Calvin Hill, Duane Thomas, John Gilliam, George Sauer, and others. The WFL had all-league teams chosen in 1974 by "The Sporting News" and by the players/coaches . The World Football League played in 1974 and 1975, although the 1975 season was ended after 12 of 18 scheduled games.

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