George Paskvan

George Oscar Paskvan (April 28, 1918 – April 25, 2005) was an American football fullback who played professional in the National Football League (NFL) for seven games for with Green Bay Packers in 1941. The Packers used the seventh pick in the first round of the 1941 NFL Draft to sign Paskvan out of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Paskvan rushed 38 times for 116 yards in his NFL career. Besides football Paskvan also competed in the shot put.

Paskvan was married to Georgine E. Paskvan, who died before him. They had six children: Sue Joyce, Fran Greene, Tom, Tim, Paul and Mary.[1]

George Paskvan
refer to caption
Paskvan at a shot put competition in 1941
Position:Fullback
Personal information
Born:April 28, 1918
McCook, Illinois
Died:April 25, 2005 (aged 86)
Career information
College:Wisconsin
NFL Draft:1941 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:7
Rushing yards:116
Average:3.1

References

  1. ^ George O. Paskvan. legacy.com

References

1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1939 Big Ten Conference football season.

1939 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1939 Big Ten Conference football season was the 44th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1939 college football season.

The 1939 Big Ten football champion was Ohio State. Led by head coach Francis Schmidt, the Buckeyes compiled a 6–2 record, outscored opponents outscored 189 to 64, and were ranked No. 15 in the final AP Poll. End Esco Sarkkinen was a consensus first-team All-American, and quarterback Don Scott was selected as a first-team All-American by one selector. Center Steve Andrako was selected as Ohio State's most valuable player.

Iowa compiled a 6-1-1 record, finished in second place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Nile Kinnick was a consensus first-team All-American and won both the Heisman Trophy and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy. End Erwin Prasse and tackle Mike Enich also won first-team All-Big Ten honors.

Michigan compiled a 6–2 record, led the conference in scoring offense (27.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 20 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Tom Harmon rushed for 884 yards and passed for another 583 yards; he was a consensus first-team All-American and finished second in the voting for both Heisman Trophy.

1939 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1939 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1939 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 1–6–1 record (0–5–1 against conference opponents) and finished in ninth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his fourth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Fullback George Paskvan was selected by the Associated Press and United Press as a first-team player on the 1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team. He was also selected as Wisconsin's most valuable player. Ralph Moeller was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium, which had a capacity of 36,000. During the 1939 season, the average attendance at home games was 23,726.

1940 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1940 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season.

1940 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1940 Big Ten Conference football season was the 45th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1940 college football season. The University of Chicago terminated its football program after the 1939 season, leaving only nine conference members fielding football teams. However, Chicago remained a member of the conference and participated in other sports, and the conference remained known generally as the Big Ten.

The 1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team under head coach Bernie Bierman compiled a perfect 8–0 record, outscored opponents by a combined total of 154 to 71, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Bob Paffrath was selected as the team's most valuable player. Tackle Urban Odson and halfback George Franck were consensus first-team picks for the 1940 College Football All-America Team.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 7–1 record, led the conference in both scoring offense (24.5 points per game) and scoring defense (4.3 points per game), and finished the season ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. The team's sole setback was a 7–6 loss on the road against Minnesota. Halfback Tom Harmon was a unanimous first-team All-American and the winner of the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, and the AP's male athlete of the year award.

Northwestern, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, finished in third place in the Big Ten with a 6–2 record and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP Poll. Northwestern's two losses were to No. 1 Minnesota (by one point) and No. 3 Michigan (by seven points). Northwestern tackle Alf Bauman was a consensus first-team All-American.

1940 College Football All-America Team

The 1940 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1940. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1940 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

Michigan halfback (and Heisman Trophy winner) Tom Harmon, Texas A&M fullback John Kimbrough, and Tennessee guard Bob Suffridge were the only three unanimous first-team All-Americans chosen by all nine official selectors.

1940 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1940 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 4–4 record (3–3 against conference opponents) and finished in a tie for fourth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his fifth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Fullback George Paskvan was selected by the Associated Press (AP) as a second-team player, and by the United Press (UP) as a third-team player, on the 1940 College Football All-America Team. He was also selected by both the AP and UP as a first-team player on the 1940 All-Big Ten Conference football team, and as Wisconsin's most valuable player. John Tennant was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium which was expanded to a capacity of 45,000 for the 1940 season. During the 1940 season, the average attendance at home games was 26,277.

1941 Green Bay Packers season

The 1941 Green Bay Packers season was their 23rd season overall and their 21st season in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a tie for first place in the Western Conference with the Chicago Bears. The Packers and Bears played a one-game playoff in Chicago to determine who would play in the NFL Championship Game. The Packers lost 33–14 to the Bears, in the first post-season game ever played between the archrivals. The second post-season game came 70 years later, in the NFC Championship game on January 22, 2011.

1941 NFL Draft

The 1941 National Football League Draft was held on December 10, 1940, at the Willard Hotel in Washington D.C.

1942 Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawks football team

The 1942 Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawks football team represented the United States Navy pre-flight aviation training school at the University of Iowa as an independent during the 1942 college football season. The team compiled a 7–3 record and outscored opponents by a total of 211 to 121. The 1942 team was known for its difficult schedule, including Notre Dame, Michigan, Ohio State, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, and Missouri. The team was ranked No. 2 among the service teams in a poll of 91 sports writers conducted by the Associated Press.The Navy's pre-flight aviation training school opened on April 15, 1942, with a 27-minute ceremony during which Iowa Governor George A. Wilson turned over certain facilities at the University of Iowa to be used for the training of naval aviators. At the time, Wilson said, "We are glad it is possible to place the facilities of this university and all the force and power of the state of Iowa in a service that is today most vital to safeguarding our liberties." The first group of 600 air cadets was schedule to arrive on May 28.Bernie Bierman, then holding the rank of major, was placed in charge of the physical conditioning program at the school. Bieman had been the head coach of Minnesota from 1932 to 1941 and served as the head coach of the Iowa Pre-Flight team in 1942. Larry Snyder, previously the track coach at Ohio State, was assigned as Bierman's assistant. Don Heap, Dallas Ward, Babe LeVoir, and Trevor Reese were assigned as assistant coaches for the football team.In June 1942, Bierman addressed the "misconception" that the Iowa pre-flight school was "merely a place for varsity athletics." He said: "Our purpose here is to turn out the toughest bunch of flyers the world has ever seen and not first class athletes."Two Seahawks were named to the 1942 All-Navy All-America football team: George Svendsen at center and Dick Fisher at left halfback. In addition, Bill Kolens (right tackle), Judd Ringer (right end), George Benson (quarterback), and Bill Schatzer (left halfback) were named to the 1942 All-Navy Preflight Cadet All-America team.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

La Grange, Illinois

The village of La Grange () (often spelled LaGrange), a suburb of Chicago, is a village in Cook County, in the U.S. state of Illinois. The population was 15,550 at the 2010 census.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Serbian Americans

This is a list of notable Serbian Americans, including both original immigrants who obtained American citizenship and their American descendants.

To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Serbian American or must have references showing they are Serbian American and are notable.

List of University of Wisconsin–Madison people in athletics

List of University of Wisconsin–Madison people in athletics

List of Wisconsin Badgers in the NFL Draft

The University of Wisconsin–Madison Badgers have drafted 294 players into the National Football League (NFL) since the league began holding drafts in 1936. The Badgers' highest draft position was second overall in 1944, when Pat Harder was selected by Card-Pitt. Wisconsin's first drafted player in the NFL was Eddie Jankowski, who was the 9th overall pick by the Green Bay Packers in 1937. Five former Badgers were selected from the latest NFL draft: Nick Nelson, Troy Fumagalli, Natrell Jamerson, Jack Cichy and Leon Jacobs.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL Draft. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).Before the AFL–NFL merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft. This list includes players that have transferred to or from Wisconsin.

Paskvan

Paskvan is the surname of the following people:

George Paskvan (1918–2005), American football fullback

Joe Paskvan (born 1952), American attorney and politician

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