George McQuillan

George Watt McQuillan (May 1, 1885 – March 30, 1940), born in Brooklyn, New York, was a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies (1907–10 and 1915–16), Cincinnati Reds (1911), Pittsburgh Pirates (1913–15) and Cleveland Indians (1918).

In 1907 he set one of the longest-lived records in major league history when he pitched 25 innings before giving up the first earned run of his career. Although others have pitched more consecutive innings without an earned run, until July 2008 no one had gone longer without prior major league experience. The record stood for 101 years before being broken by Oakland Athletics reliever Brad Ziegler, who extended the record to 39​13 innings.

McQuillan's extraordinary success as a rookie was no fluke: he posted a 1.69 ERA in his first four seasons, comprising more than 800 innings pitched; during those years his Adjusted ERA+ (the ratio of the league's ERA, adjusted to the pitcher's ballpark, to that of the pitcher) was a staggering 164. In 1910, he would have led the majors with an Adjusted ERA+ of 195 had he pitched only an additional 1​23 innings to meet the minimum requirement of 154 innings pitched.

McQuillan helped the Phillies win the 1915 National League Pennant. He is still the Philadelphia Phillies Career Leader in ERA (1.79), WHIP (1.02) and Hits Allowed/9IP (6.93). He currently ranks 23rd on the MLB Career ERA List (2.38), 37th on the WHIP List (1.131) and 86th on the Hits Allowed/9IP List (7.89).

In 10 seasons he had an 85–89 Win–Loss record, 273 Games (173 Started), 105 Complete Games, 17 Shutouts, 76 Games Finished, 14 Saves, 1,576 ⅓ Innings Pitched, 1,382 Hits Allowed, 577 Runs Allowed, 417 Earned Runs Allowed, 23 Home Runs Allowed, 401 Walks Allowed, 590 Strikeouts, 30 Hit Batsmen, 16 Wild Pitches, 6,297 Batters Faced, a 2.38 ERA and 1.131 WHIP.

McQuillan's major league career was cut short due to his chronic alcoholism and infection by syphilis. However, he continued to play and coach in the minor leagues and semi-pro ball. He died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 54.

George McQuillan
George McQuillan
Pitcher
Born: May 1, 1885
Brooklyn, New York
Died: March 30, 1940 (aged 54)
Columbus, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 8, 1907, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 1, 1918, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record85-89
Earned run average2.38
Strikeouts590
Teams

Sources

1907 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1907 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1908 Major League Baseball season

The 1908 Major League Baseball season. The Chicago Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–1 to win the World Series.

1908 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1908 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1909 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1909 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1910 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1910 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1911 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1911 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 70–83, 29 games behind the New York Giants.

1911 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1911 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 79 wins and 73 losses.

1913 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1913 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 32nd season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 27th in the National League. The Pirates finished fourth in the league standings with a record of 78–71.

1915 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1915 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Phillies winning the National League, then going on to lose the 1915 World Series to the Boston Red Sox. This was the team's first pennant since joining the league in 1883. They would have to wait another 35 years for their second.

1916 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1916 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1918 Cleveland Indians season

The 1918 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 73–54, 2½ games behind the Boston Red Sox.

Columbus Senators

The Columbus Senators Minor league baseball team was born in 1888 as a founding member of the Tri-State League. After that, the Senators played in the Western League (1897-1899), Interstate League (1900) Western Association (1901) and American Association (1902–1930). The team represented Columbus, Ohio, and played their home games at Recreation Park and Neil Park.

In their first season, the Senators finished in third place with a 64-50 record. The nickname was used again in 1897, when the Columbus team in the Western League changed its name from the Columbus Buckeyes to the Senators. Columbus competed until 1899, when the team had to move before the season was completed. In 1900, Columbus also posted a Senators club in the Interstate League, moving to the Western Association in 1901.

By 1902, the Senators became one of the founding members of the new American Association. Before the 1905 season the team owner built Neil Park, the first concrete-and-steel stadium in the minor leagues. From 1905 through 1907, the Senators won the league title,losing the Junior World Series in 1906 and 1907. The team declined after that, and never finished higher than fourth place between 1919 and 1930. The 1905 Senators were recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.In 1931, the St. Louis Cardinals took control of the Columbus team as part of their developing minor league system and renamed them the Columbus Red Birds.

Hooks Wiltse

George Leroy "Hooks" Wiltse (September 7, 1879 – January 21, 1959) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played twelve seasons in Major League Baseball from 1904 to 1915. He was the brother of pitcher Snake Wiltse.

"Hooks" earned his nickname because of his exceptional curveball and was one of the earliest pitchers to have a curveball that was regarded as more effective than his fastball. From 1904 to 1914, he pitched for the National League's New York Giants. During that time, he combined with teammate Christy Mathewson for 435 wins, making them one of the best lefty-righty duos in history. Wiltse won five pennants with the Giants and pitched 3.1 innings in the 1911 World Series.

On July 4, 1908, Wiltse pitched a perfect game through 26 batters until he hit Philadelphia Phillies pitcher George McQuillan on a 2–2 count in a scoreless game. This was the only occurrence of a pitcher losing a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning by hitting a batter until Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer did so on June 20, 2015. Like Wiltse, Scherzer eventually completed a no-hitter, but unlike Wiltse, Scherzer had a 6-0 lead and was able to retire the next batter to end the game. Umpire Cy Rigler later admitted that he should have called the previous pitch strike three, which would have ended the inning. Wiltse pitched on, winning 1–0 in ten innings, with the hit-batsman the only lapse separating him from a perfect game. Wiltse's ten-inning complete game no-hitter still remains a Major League record.As a pitcher, Wiltse was an above average hitter and fielder and was occasionally used as a position player to include playing first base in game two of the 1913 World Series where he cut down two runners at home plate in the ninth inning.In 1915, he jumped to the Brooklyn Tip-Tops of the Federal League, which is where he ended his major league career. He continued to play minor league baseball on and off until 1926. His last appearance came with the Reading Keystones, where he played in five games at the age of 46.Following his retirement from baseball, Hooks returned to his hometown of Syracuse, New York where he worked in real estate and became involved in local politics, serving as a local alderman and property assessor.Wiltse died of emphysema on January 21, 1959 at age 79.

”I missed being the only pitcher of all time to pitch a perfect ten inning game because Cy Rigler miscalled a strike. He admitted afterward he could have called it one. It was a tough break for the next pitch struck McQuillan on the shoulder and put him on first base. It has been a perfect game for eight and two-thirds innings.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

List of Major League Baseball career WHIP leaders

In baseball statistics, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of the number of baserunners a pitcher has allowed per inning pitched. WHIP reflects a pitcher's propensity for allowing batters to reach base, therefore a lower WHIP indicates better performance. WHIP is calculated by adding the number of walks and hits allowed and dividing this sum by the number of innings pitched.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball pitchers in Walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) with at least 1,000 innings pitched.

Addie Joss is the all-time leader with a career WHIP of 0.9678. Ed Walsh (0.9996) is the only other player with a career WHIP under 1.0000.

List of Philadelphia Phillies Opening Day starting pitchers

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Philadelphia. They play in the National League East division. Also known in early franchise history as the "Philadelphia Quakers", the Phillies have used 72 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 128 seasons. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Where decisions are known, the 72 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 33 wins, 40 losses and 20 no decisions (33–40–20); where decisions are unknown, the team's record was 17–19. No decisions are awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game. It can also result if a starting pitcher does not pitch five full innings, even if his team retains the lead and wins.Hall of Fame left-handed pitcher Steve Carlton has the most Opening Day starts for the Phillies, with 14, compiling a record of 3–9–2. He is followed by Robin Roberts (twelve starts; 5–6–1), Chris Short (six starts; 3–1–2), and Curt Schilling (five starts; 2–0–3). Grover Cleveland Alexander also made five Opening Day starts for the Phillies, equal to Schilling; however, no information on his decisions in those games is available. The team's record in his five Opening Day starts is 4–1.

Roberts holds the Phillies' record for most wins in Opening Day starts with five. Art Mahaffey has the best record in Opening Day starts for the franchise; though many players have won their only Opening Day start, Mahaffey started and won two Opening Day games, for a winning percentage of 1.000; Roy Halladay also has a 1.000 winning percentage, with two wins and a no decision in three starts. Conversely, George McQuillan is the only player to have a .000 winning percentage in more than one Opening Day start (0–2–0 in two starts). Brett Myers has a .000 winning percentage in his three starts, but has accumulated two no decisions (0–1–2). Carlton has the most Opening Day losses for the team, with nine.

The Phillies have played in six home ballparks. Their best overall Opening Day record is at Shibe Park (also known as Connie Mack Stadium), where they won 11 Opening Day games out of 14 played there (11–3). The team also owned an 8–17 Opening Day record at Baker Bowl (initially known as the Philadelphia Baseball Grounds), with 1 tie. Recreation Park's Opening Day record is 1–2, while Veterans Stadium has the lowest winning percentage (.200), with 2 wins and 8 losses. The Phillies currently play at Citizens Bank Park, where they are 1–5 on Opening Day.

The Phillies have played in seven World Series championships in their history, winning in 1980 and 2008. Carlton won his Opening Day start against the Montreal Expos in 1980, while Myers received a no-decision against the same franchise (now the Washington Nationals) in 2008, a game that the Phillies eventually lost, and lost the opening game against the Atlanta Braves in 2009. Carlton also started Opening Day in 1983, the year that the Phillies lost to the Baltimore Orioles in the World Series. Alexander started Opening Day in 1915, the Phillies' first World Series appearance, while Roberts started the first game of 1950, and Terry Mulholland the first game of 1993.

List of Philadelphia Phillies team records

The Philadelphia Phillies have participated in 127 seasons in Major League Baseball since their inception in 1883. Through 2009, they have played 19,035 games, winning 9,035 and losing 10,162, for a winning their tenure as members of Major League Baseball's National League.

Chuck Klein, the franchise's only batting Triple Crown winner, holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2009 season, with eight, including career slugging percentage, career on-base plus slugging (OPS), and single-season extra-base hits. He is followed by Billy Hamilton, who holds seven records, including career batting average and the single-season runs record.

Several Phillies hold National League and major league records. Pitcher/outfielder John Coleman is the most decorated in this category, holding three major league records, all from the franchise's inaugural season. Coleman set records for losses, earned runs allowed, and hits allowed, all in 1883 when he also set three additional franchise pitching records. Shortstop Jimmy Rollins broke Willie Wilson's record for at-bats in a single season with 716 in 2007, and first baseman Ryan Howard also set the major league record for strikeouts in a single season that same year with 199, before it was broken by Mark Reynolds of the Arizona Diamondbacks the following year. The 1930 Phillies, who went 52–102, set two more National League records, allowing 1,993 hits and 1,193 runs in the regular season.

Max Surkont

Matthew Constantine Surkont (June 16, 1922 – October 8, 1986) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played from 1949 through 1957 in the Major Leagues. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Boston Braves, Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, and New York Giants. The nickname Max was given to him by his childhood friends.

McQuillan

McQuillan and MacQuillan are surnames of Irish origin. There are several unrelated origins of the surnames McQuillan and MacQuillan.

The Ulster variant of the surname was claimed to be an anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Uighilín (son of Hugelin), the name allegedly adopted by the family of Hugelin de Mandeville. The de Mandevilles were a Cambro-Norman family and had conquered an area of north Antrim.In reality the de Mandevilles sold their estates in northern Antrim to the McQuillans. Both families had previously held the office of "constable of the bonnaght" for the Earldom of Ulster – a system adopted from the Irish where mercenaries where hired to act as a body of standing troops. The McQuillans renamed the lands they acquired "the Route", derived from their "rout", a common term then for a private army.These McQuillans played a large role in the history of County Antrim

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