George McCaskey

George Halas McCaskey is the current chairman of the NFL's Chicago Bears, who replaced his brother Michael McCaskey as chairman in 2011.[2]

George H. McCaskey
NationalityUnited States
Alma materArizona State University
OccupationTicket office director (1991–2010)
Chairman (2011–present)
OrganizationChicago Bears
PredecessorMichael McCaskey (Chairman)
SuccessorLee Twarling (Ticket office director)[1]
Board member ofChicago Bears
Spouse(s)Barb McCaskey[1]
Parent(s)Virginia Halas McCaskey
Ed McCaskey

Biography

McCaskey, the eighth-oldest child of Bears owner Virginia Halas McCaskey and Ed McCaskey (who himself was a former Bears chairman), was originally an assistant state attorney in Lee and DeKalb counties. McCaskey also worked in television after graduating with both a bachelor's degree (1978) and law degree (1981) from Arizona State University, and was a reporter for an NBC affiliate in Peoria.[1][3] He was the team's senior director of ticket operations since the Bears 1991 season,[4] and was a member of the team's board of directors since 2004.[5]

In 2011, during the NFL lockout, McCaskey's brother Michael retired as chairman of the club after 12 years. Before he assumed his position, he met with Chicago Blackhawks owner Rocky Wirtz, as well as White Sox and Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf. Jerry Jones of the Dallas Cowboys was the first NFL owner with whom he met. McCaskey reflected on meeting Jones, commenting, “He was very gracious, very accommodating. He’s a fascinating guy. I really enjoyed visiting with him, getting to know him. We sat in a suite at Cowboys Stadium and looked out over the field. We then went downstairs and bumped into a tour group. As soon as they saw who he was, they were going crazy. They were taking pictures and he was chatting them up.”[2]

References

  1. ^ a b c "'He's-one-of-us'-sums-up-style-of - Chicago Sun-Times". Suntimes.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  2. ^ a b "George McCaskey becomes chairman". Chicagobears.com. Archived from the original on 2011-08-20. Retrieved 2012-07-14.
  3. ^ "Chicago Bears: George McCaskey is settling into his new role - Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 2011-06-09. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  4. ^ "George McCaskey to prepare for new role". Chicagobears.com. 2010-04-21. Retrieved 2012-07-31.
  5. ^ "George McCaskey Takes Over As Bears Chairman « CBS Chicago". Chicago.cbslocal.com. 2011-05-06. Retrieved 2012-07-31.

External links

2010 Chicago Bears season

The 2010 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 91st season overall in the National Football League. Coming off a disappointing 7–9 record in the 2009 season and failing to qualify for the NFL playoffs for a third consecutive season, the Bears sought to develop their roster and improve on their record in 2010, particularly their standing in the NFC North. All Bears home games were scheduled to be played at Soldier Field. With their final regular season record at 11–5, the Bears improved drastically on their 2009 record. Their regular season finished with their first playoff appearance since the Super Bowl season of 2006, winning the NFC North division and earning a bye as the NFC's second seed. The Bears won their first game in the Divisional round of the playoffs, defeating the Seattle Seahawks on January 16, 2011, to advance to the NFC Championship game. The Chicago Bears's 2010 season came to an end January 23, 2011 with a 21–14 loss to their longtime rivals and eventual Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the last time the Bears won the NFC North and appeared in the postseason until 2018.

2011 Chicago Bears season

The 2011 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 92nd overall season in the National Football League, and the 8th under head coach Lovie Smith. The Bears, defending NFC North Division champions, attempted a return to the playoffs after falling in the NFC Championship Game to their arch-rivals the Green Bay Packers. The club was scheduled to partake in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Game but due to the lockout, the game was cancelled. The Bears traveled to Wembley Stadium in London to take on the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFL International Series and played the Packers on Christmas Day evening in the only scheduled game on that day. The Bears finished the season with an 8–8 record and did not qualify for the playoffs again until 2018.

2012 Chicago Bears season

The 2012 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 93rd season in the National Football League, as well as the ninth under head coach Lovie Smith. The team played at Soldier Field for the tenth season since its reconstruction in 2001.

The Bears entered the 2012 season looking to improve on their 8–8 record in 2011. They acquired wide receiver Brandon Marshall from the Miami Dolphins, who had played with Bears Quarterback, Jay Cutler with the Denver Broncos from 2006–2008. The Bears were expected to be a wild card team by ten ESPN experts, and four NFL.com analysts predicted that the team would finish second in the NFC North. By the season's midpoint, the Bears had proven to be among the league's elite teams, having a record of 7–1 in their first 8 games, something they had not accomplished since their 2006 Super Bowl season, along with a scoring differential of +120, which led the league. The team trailed the San Francisco 49ers in scoring defense with 15 points per game allowed, and third in scoring offense with 29.5, trailing the New England Patriots and Houston Texans. The defense also recorded six interceptions returned for touchdowns in the first seven games of the season, an NFL record; the Bears then recorded two more in the season, one shy of the record set by the 1961 San Diego Chargers. However, during the second half of the season, the Bears went 3–5, and after scoring 19 touchdowns in the first eight games, the Bears scored ten fewer in the second half of the season. Despite defeating the Detroit Lions in the season finale to have a record of 10–6, the Minnesota Vikings, who had a better division record than Chicago, defeated the Green Bay Packers 37–34, ending the Bears season. As a result, the Bears became the first team since the 1996 Washington Redskins to start the season 7–1 and miss the playoffs. On December 31, Smith was fired, and was replaced by Montreal Alouettes head coach Marc Trestman.The Bears finished the season by leading the NFL in takeaways with 44, sixth in third-down efficiency (35.5 percent) and eighth in sacks with 41, while ranking third in the league in fewest points allowed with 277; Chicago was the lone team in the top five in that category to not qualify for the playoffs. The Bears also had a +20 turnover margin, second behind the New England Patriots; the Bears and New York Giants were the only teams in the top eleven of the category to not make the playoffs.This would be the last winning season for the Bears until 2018.

2013 Chicago Bears season

The 2013 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 94th season in the National Football League. The season was the first year under head coach Marc Trestman, as Lovie Smith was fired on December 31, 2012. The team played at Soldier Field for the 11th season since its reconstruction in 2001. The Bears failed to qualify for the playoffs with an 8–8 record, the sixth time in seven years since the Super Bowl XLI loss in 2006.The Bears started the regular season by winning their first three games before losing in weeks four and five to the Detroit Lions and New Orleans Saints, respectively. The following game after winning against the New York Giants, quarterback Jay Cutler suffered a groin injury against the Washington Redskins, as the Bears entered the bye week at 4–3. With Cutler out, Josh McCown stepped in against the Green Bay Packers in week nine, leading the Bears to victory. Cutler returned in the next game against the Lions, but injured his ankle in the loss, and McCown filled in for the next four games; during the four-game span under McCown, the Bears went 2–2, while McCown excelled, throwing thirteen touchdowns and one interception. As a result, when Cutler returned in week fourteen against the Cleveland Browns, controversy arose over who should be the starter. After winning against Cleveland, the Lions lost the following day, allowing the Bears to clinch the NFC North in week sixteen with Packers and Lions losses grouped with a victory over the Philadelphia Eagles. However, the Bears lost 54–11, and in week seventeen against the Packers, the Bears were eliminated from playoff contention with a 33–28 loss.

2015 Chicago Bears season

The 2015 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 96th season in the National Football League. After the firing of general manager Phil Emery and head coach Marc Trestman following the 2014 season, the team hired former New Orleans Saints director of player personnel Ryan Pace and Denver Broncos head coach John Fox to fill those positions, respectively. Fox's hiring marked the Bears' third head coach in four seasons.

The Bears entered the 2015 season with hopes of improving their 5–11 record in 2014. The team started the regular season with a rough start, losing their first three games. In the following eight games, the team went 5–3, including a Thanksgiving win over the rival Green Bay Packers. However, the Bears then lost the first three games in December, and were officially eliminated from playoff contention in week fifteen by the Minnesota Vikings. In week sixteen against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the Bears improved upon their 2014 record with a 26–21 win. After losing in the final game of the season to the Detroit Lions, the Bears ended the season 6–10 and last in the NFC North.

The 2015 Bears were more competitive in games compared to the 2014 team, with six of their ten losses being by less than a touchdown. Additionally, new coordinators Adam Gase and Vic Fangio helped revitalize the offense and defense, respectively; under Gase, quarterback Jay Cutler threw a career-low eleven interceptions and recorded a 92.3 passer rating, the highest in his career. With Fangio, the defense allowed 397 points; the last two defenses had previously allowed franchise highs in points, including 442 in 2014. However, the team was marred by injuries during the year, with only four players starting all sixteen games. The Bears also went 1–7 at home in 2015, the worst home record in franchise history. This was also the first time since 1973 that the Bears failed to win a home game against a division opponent.

2017 Chicago Bears season

The 2017 season was the Chicago Bears' 98th in the National Football League and their third and final season under head coach John Fox. The Bears improved upon the previous year's 3–13 record, finishing 5–11, but failed to make the playoffs and suffered their fourth consecutive losing season.

This was their first season since 2008 without Jay Cutler as their starting quarterback, ending an eight-year era. Instead, the Bears picked up former Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon in free agency and traded up to the number two overall pick in the draft for Mitchell Trubisky. Glennon started the first four games of the season, but was benched for Trubisky after a 1–3 start. Despite entering the bye week with a 3–5 record, the Bears were eliminated from playoff contention following a week thirteen loss against the San Francisco 49ers, and finished the season 5–11. In addition, no Bears players were selected to the Pro Bowl. To add to these failures, it was the first season since 1969 that the Bears failed to win a game against a divisional opponent.

On January 1, 2018, after failing to produce a winning season for the third year in a row, Fox was fired following the Bears 23–10 loss to the Vikings the day prior.

2019 Chicago Bears season

The 2019 Chicago Bears season will be the franchise's 100th season in the National Football League, as well as the second under head coach Matt Nagy. They will attempt to improve upon their 12–4 record from 2018, make the playoffs for the second consecutive season, and break their 8 year long drought of having not won a playoff game.

Brian Urlacher

Brian Urlacher (; born May 25, 1978) is a former American football linebacker who spent his entire 13-year career playing for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for The University of New Mexico, where he was recognized as a consensus All-American and became one of the school's most decorated athletes.

The Bears selected Urlacher with the ninth overall pick in the 2000 NFL Draft. Urlacher quickly established himself as one of the NFL's most productive defensive players. After winning the NFL Rookie of the Year Award in 2000, he was elected to eight Pro Bowls, and won the NFL Defensive Player of the Year award in 2005. His playing style, accomplishments and reputation have made him one of the team's most popular players. After retiring from professional football, he was briefly an analyst for Fox Sports 1. He was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility on February 3, 2018.

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded more victories than any other NFL franchise.The franchise was founded in Decatur, Illinois, on September 17, 1920, and moved to Chicago in 1921. It is one of only two remaining franchises from the NFL's founding in 1920, along with the Arizona Cardinals, which was originally also in Chicago. The team played home games at Wrigley Field on Chicago's North Side through the 1970 season; they now play at Soldier Field on the Near South Side, next to Lake Michigan. The Bears have a long-standing rivalry with the Green Bay Packers.The team headquarters, Halas Hall, is in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, Illinois. The Bears practice at adjoining facilities there during the season. Since 2002, the Bears have held their annual training camp, from late July to mid-August, at Ward Field on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Illinois.

Chicago Honey Bears

The Chicago Honey Bears were a cheerleading squad for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League during the late 1970s and early 1980s. The group performed at Bears games at Soldier Field, and also at one away game in Tampa Bay Florida with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and their Cheerleaders the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Swashbucklers until Super Bowl XX, which was their final appearance. The Chicago Honey Bears donated numerous hours of service to charities, as well as made guest appearances on T.V, including the Richard Simmons Show, the WGN Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Telethon and performed and signed autographs at various other events, including at the Great Lakes Naval Station for the Navy Servicemen. They did various ads and posters, including a Kodak film ad, a Chicago Buckingham Fountain Post Card, a Stroh's Beer poster, and a poster of The Chicago Honey Bears official head shots featuring hair and make up by Vidal Sassoon, who was the official hair stylist of the NFL Chicago Honey Bears. Vidal Sassoon , selected Chicago Honey Bear line Captain/ and assistant choreographer Sharon Shackelford to be a hair model and he cut, colored and styled her hair live on the Phil Donahue Show. These examples are just a few of the numerous charities, T.V shows and events that the Honey Bear squad participated in. Aside from the Chicago Honey Bears being dancers and cheerleaders, at the Honey Bear auditions, Cathy Core and a panel of judges, including talent agents, narrowed their search by making the contestants display an additional talent , such as singing, playing instruments, acrobatic abilities or other dance forms and talents, before making their final selections of who would be on the squad each season. They also did modeling , including an incident when a member of the squad appeared topless in a Playboy magazine. After this incident, the Cheerleaders signed contracts that forbade posing nude and also forbade fraternizing with the Chicago Bears Football players except at approved events. After Super Bowl XX the squad was disbanded, and currently, the Bears are one of the six NFL teams that do not have cheerleaders, along with the Buffalo Bills, Cleveland Browns, Green Bay Packers, New York Giants, and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Logos and uniforms of the Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears of the National Football League sport a wishbone 'C' logo, which the team has used since the 1960s.

Since the team's inception in 1920, the Bears' uniforms have received very little changes, with minor changes and various patches added. The classic look of the club's uniforms has given it the title of one of the best uniform sets in the league.

Matt Forte

Matthew Garrett Forte (born December 10, 1985) is a former American football running back who played ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Tulane and was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft. Forte established himself as a dual-threat running back who is capable of earning yards as a rusher and receiver. He spent eight years with the Bears before playing for the New York Jets for two seasons.

Michael McCaskey

Michael McCaskey (born December 1943) was the Chairman of the Chicago Bears in the National Football League from 1999 until 2011.

Phil Emery (American football)

Phillip Emery (born January 16, 1959) is an American football scout for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL). He served as the general manager of the Chicago Bears of the from 2012 to 2014.

Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

The Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law (ASU Law) is one of the professional graduate schools at Arizona State University, located in Phoenix, Arizona. The school is currently located in the Beus Center for Law and Society on ASU's downtown Phoenix campus. The law school was created in 1965 as the Arizona State University College of Law upon recommendation of the Arizona Board of Regents, with the first classes held in the fall of 1967. The school has held American Bar Association accreditation since 1969 and is a member of the Order of the Coif. The school is also a member of the Association of American Law Schools. In 2006, the law school was renamed in honor of retired United States Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.

ASU Law is ranked 25th overall in the nation by U.S. News and World Report, the 8th-highest public law school, and the highest-ranked law school of the three in Arizona.

Virginia Halas McCaskey

Virginia Halas McCaskey (born January 5, 1923) is the principal owner of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. She is the eldest child of former Bears coach and owner George Halas, who left the team to his daughter upon his death in 1983, and Minnie Bushing Halas. After the death of Buffalo Bills owner Ralph Wilson in March 2014, she became the oldest owner in the NFL.Her formal title within the Bears organization is secretary of the board of directors. However, she is empowered to speak for the interests of her children and grandchildren, effectively giving her 80% ownership of the team.

WFTY-DT

WFTY-DT, virtual channel 67 (UHF digital channel 23), is a television station licensed to Smithtown, New York and serving Long Island. The station is owned by Univision Communications, along with WFUT-DT (channel 68) Newark, New Jersey and WXTV-DT (channel 41) Paterson, New Jersey. The stations share studios and offices on Frank W. Burr Boulevard in Teaneck, New Jersey; WFTY's transmitter facility is located in Middle Island, New York.

WFTY's programming is simulcast on WFUT's subchannel 68.3, which serves New York City and northern New Jersey.

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