George Kalinsky

George Kalinsky is a photographer. He has been the official photographer for Madison Square Garden since 1966 and also serves as the official photographer at Radio City Music Hall. In November 2010 the National Arts Club awarded him their Medal of Honor for Photography.[1]

Kalinsky's photos have been in many major publications, such as Sports Illustrated, People, Newsweek, and The New York Times. He has authored ten books.

In May 2009, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum opened an exhibit dedicated to photographs Kalinsky took at some of Madison Square Garden's most legendary concerts.[2] Many of these photographs are now part of the Museum's permanent collection.

Beginning with the 2010 baseball season, the New York Mets, for whom Kalinsky had been the official photographer, are displaying throughout Citi Field many photographs by Kalinsky.

Biography

Recently Kalinsky was honored with the 2017 Legends Award by Pratt Institute with a dinner at the Mandarian Hotel in November 2017. The New-York Historical Society currently has an exhibit "New York through the Lens of George Kalinsky" featuring 80 images of Kalinsky's work from the last 50 years. The show opened to great reviews and will be on extended viewing until July 2018. The museum will make this exhibit part of their permanent collection. In February 2018, Sports Business Journal featured Kalinsky and his career on the front page of their magazine. Frank Sinatra Enterprises is also producing a documentary on George’s 50-year career.

Memorable Moments

Championships won by New York City teams

Political Conventions

Other moments

Honors and awards

  • 2001 - Recipient of the highest award given by the photography industry (PMDA) as International Photographer of the Year.
  • 2001 - Named "Sportsman of the Year" by the National Center for Disabilities, an organization for which he served as co-chairman.
  • 2001 - Named "Man of the Year" by Pratt Institute, where he had been a design student.
  • 2007 - Inducted into the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[3]
  • 2008 - Recipient of Pratt Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • 2010 - New York City Basketball Hall of Fame inductee.[4]
  • 2010 - Recipient of National Arts Club's Medal of Honor for Photography.
  • 2015 - Recipient of New York Knicks' Dick McGuire Legacy Award.[5]
  • 2017 - Recipient of Pratt Institute's Legends Award.
  • Served on the Fulbright Scholarship Foundation
  • Included in New York Resident's list of top 100 New Yorkers.

References

  1. ^ http://www.nationalartsclub.org/pb_Committees_Photography.php
  2. ^ http://www.rockhall.com/pressroom/madison-square-garden-photography-exhibit
  3. ^ http://www.jewishsports.org/jewishsports/detail.asp?sp=219
  4. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/gossip/2010/08/27/2010-08-27_bethenny_frankel_pulls_out_the_barbs_for_former_real_housewife_danielle_staub.html
  5. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/confidential/west-chelsea-fears-chef-surprise-article-1.2199249

External links

Griffith Stadium

Griffith Stadium was a mixed-use stadium that stood in Washington, D.C., from 1911 to 1965, between Georgia Avenue and 5th Street (left field), and between W Street and Florida Avenue NW.

An earlier wooden baseball park had been built on the same site in 1891. It was called Boundary Field, or National Park as its occupants were then known primarily by the nickname Nationals. This park was destroyed by a fire in March 1911 and replaced by a steel and concrete structure, also at first called National Park and then American League Park; it was renamed for Washington Senators owner Clark Griffith in 1923. The stadium was home to the American League Senators from 1911 through 1960, and to an expansion team of the same name for their first season in 1961.

The venue hosted the All-Star Game in 1937 and 1956, as well as World Series games in 1924, 1925, and 1933. It served as home for the Negro league Homestead Grays during the 1940s. It was also home to the Washington Redskins of the National Football League for 24 seasons, from the time they transferred from Boston in 1937 through the 1960 season.

The ballpark was demolished in 1965 and the Howard University Hospital now occupies the site.

History of the New York Mets

The history of the New York Mets began in 1962 when the team was introduced as part of the National League's first expansion of the 20th century. The team's history includes two World Series championships and five National League pennants.

History of the New York Rangers

The history of the New York Rangers hockey team began in 1926 when the National Hockey League (NHL) granted a franchise to Tex Rickard, the founder of the team. The Rangers experienced early success, winning the Stanley Cup in only their second season of existence, and would go on to win two more in the next 12 years.

After their Stanley Cup win in 1940, the Rangers then suffered through one of the longest championship droughts in NHL history, which became known as the Curse of 1940. The 54-year drought ended with a Stanley Cup win in 1994 by a team led by captain Mark Messier, Brian Leetch, Adam Graves and Mike Richter, all of whose numbers have since been retired by the team.

Jesse Orosco

Jesse Russell Orosco (born April 21, 1957) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who holds the major league record for career pitching appearances, having pitched in 1,252 games. He pitched most notably for the New York Mets in the 1980s and made the NL All-Star team in 1983 and 1984. He won a World Series in 1986 with the Mets and in 1988 with the Dodgers. He threw left-handed, but batted right-handed. He retired in 2003 after having been with the Mets, Dodgers, Cleveland Indians, Milwaukee Brewers, Baltimore Orioles, St. Louis Cardinals, San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, and Minnesota Twins. He retired when he was 46 years old, one of the oldest players to still be playing in the modern age. Orosco is one of only 29 players in baseball history to date to have appeared in Major League games in four decades.

Orosco's longevity was greatly aided by the increasing use of left-handed specialist relief pitchers from the 1990s onward; in his last several years, he was used almost exclusively in this role.

List of Boston Latin School alumni

Boston Latin School is a public exam school located in Boston, Massachusetts, that was founded in 1635. It is the first public school and the oldest existing school in the United States.The school's first class included nine students; the school now has 2,400 pupils drawn from all parts of Boston. Its graduates have included four Harvard presidents, eight Massachusetts state governors, and five signers of the United States Declaration of Independence, as well as several preeminent architects, a leading art historian, a notable naturalist and the conductors of the New York Philharmonic and Boston Pops orchestras. There are also several notable non-graduate alumni, including Louis Farrakhan, a leader of the Nation of Islam. Boston Latin admitted only male students at its founding in 1635. The school's first female student was admitted in the nineteenth century. In 1972, Boston Latin admitted its first co-educational class.Admission is determined by a combination of a student's score on the Independent School Entrance Examination and recent grades, and is limited to residents of the city of Boston. Although Boston Latin runs from the 7th through the 12th grade, it admits students only into the 7th and 9th grades. In 2007, the school was named one of the top twenty high schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.

List of Madison Square Garden Walk of Fame Inductees

The Madison Square Garden Walk of Fame (MSG Walk of Fame) was established in 1992 "to recognize athletes, artists, announcers and coaches for their extraordinary achievements and memorable performances at the venue." Twenty-five athletes were inducted into the MSG Walk of Fame at its inaugural ceremony in 1992, a black-tie dinner to raise money to fight multiple sclerosis.

Mark Messier

Mark John Douglas Messier (; born January 18, 1961) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey center of the National Hockey League and former special assistant to the president and general manager of the New York Rangers. He played a quarter of a century in the NHL (1979–2004) with the Edmonton Oilers, New York Rangers, and Vancouver Canucks. He also played professionally with the World Hockey Association (WHA)'s Indianapolis Racers and Cincinnati Stingers. He was the last former WHA player to be active in professional hockey, and the last active player who had played in the NHL in the 1970s.

Messier is considered one of the greatest ice hockey players of all time. He is second on the all-time career lists for playoff points (295) and regular season games played (1756), and is third for regular season points (1887). He is a six-time Stanley Cup champion—five with the Oilers and one with the Rangers—and is the only player to captain two professional teams to championships. His playoff leadership while in New York, which ended a 54-year Stanley Cup drought in 1994, earned him the nickname "The Messiah", a play on his name. He was also known, over the course of his career, as "The Moose" for his aggression and strength. He twice won the Hart Memorial Trophy as the league's most valuable player, in 1990 and 1992, and in 1984 he won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player during the playoffs. He is a 15-time NHL All-Star. In 2007, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility. In 2017 Messier was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.On June 30, 2017, he was named an Officer of the Order of Canada by Governor General David Johnston for "contributions to hockey as an outstanding player and captain, and for his leadership in encouraging children to take up the sport."

Nat Militzok

Nathan "Nat" Militzok (May 3, 1923 – May 14, 2009) was an American professional basketball player. He played the forward position for various teams, including the New York Knicks.

National Arts Club

The National Arts Club is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and members club on Gramercy Park, Manhattan, New York City. It was founded in 1898 by Charles DeKay, an art and literary critic of the New York Times to "stimulate, foster, and promote public interest in the arts and to educate the American people in the fine arts". Since 1906 the organization has occupied the Samuel J. Tilden House, a landmarked Victorian Gothic Revival brownstone at 15 Gramercy Park, next door to The Players, a club with similar interests. The National Arts Club is noted for allowing members access to a Gramercy Park key.

The National Arts Club has several art galleries, and hosts a variety of public programs in all artistic areas including theater, literature and music. Although the club is private, many of its events are free and open to the public. The club's mansion headquarters was designated a New York City landmark in 1966, and declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976. It is located in the Gramercy Park Historic District.

National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museum

The National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museum, in Commack, New York, is dedicated to honoring American Jewish figures who have distinguished themselves in sports.Its objective is to foster Jewish identity through athletics, and to commemorate sports heroes who have emerged from a people not commonly associated with sports.The Hall has inductees in the sports of American football, auto-racing, baseball, basketball, bicycling, bowling, boxing, Canadian football, canoeing, cycling, discus, dressage, fencing, figure skating, golf, gymnastics, handball, horse showing, horse-racing, ice hockey, judo, karate, lacrosse, marathon running, pole vault, racquetball, rowing, rugby, shot put, skiing, soccer (European football), softball, squash, swimming, tennis, track, triathlete, volleyball, weightlifting, and wrestling. It has also inducted authors, broadcasters, columnists, and sportscasters.The first annual induction ceremony was held on March 21, 1993.

Phil Jackson

Philip Douglas Jackson (born September 17, 1945) is an American former professional basketball player, coach, and executive in the National Basketball Association (NBA). A power forward, Jackson played 12 seasons in the NBA, winning NBA championships with the New York Knicks in 1970 and 1973. Jackson was the head coach of the Chicago Bulls from 1989 to 1998, during which time Chicago won six NBA championships. He then coached the Los Angeles Lakers from 1999 to 2004 and again from 2005 to 2011; the team won five championships under his leadership. Jackson's 11 NBA titles as a coach, surpassed the previous record of nine set by Red Auerbach. He holds the NBA record for the most combined championships, winning a total of 13 as a player and a coach.

Jackson is known for his use of Tex Winter's triangle offense as well as a holistic approach to coaching that was influenced by Eastern philosophy, garnering him the nickname "Zen Master". Jackson cited Robert Pirsig's book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance as one of the major guiding forces in his life. He also applied Native American spiritual practices, as documented in his book Sacred Hoops. He is the author of several candid books about his teams and his basketball strategies. In 2007, Jackson was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame. In 1996, as part of celebrations for the National Basketball Association's 50th anniversary, Jackson was named one of the 10 greatest coaches in league history.Jackson retired from coaching in 2011 and joined the Knicks as an executive in March 2014. He was dismissed as the Knicks' team president on June 28, 2017.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, on the shore of Lake Erie, recognizes and archives the history of the best-known and most influential artists, producers, engineers, and other notable figures who have had some major influence on the development of rock and roll. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was established on April 20, 1983, by Ahmet Ertegun, founder and chairman of Atlantic Records. In 1986, Cleveland was chosen as the Hall of Fame's permanent home.

Rope-a-dope

The rope-a-dope is a boxing fighting style commonly associated with Muhammad Ali in his 1974 Rumble in the Jungle match against George Foreman.

In many competitive situations, rope-a-dope is used to describe strategies in which one contender lets their opponent fatigue themself by drawing non-injuring offensive actions. This then gives the contender an advantage towards the end of the competition or before, as the opponent becomes tired, allowing the contender to execute devastating offensive maneuvers and thereby win.

Staley-Wise Gallery

Staley-Wise Gallery is a fine art photography gallery located in New York City, focusing on the masters of fashion photography, as well as portraiture, landscape, still life and nudes. The gallery was founded in 1981 by Etheleen Staley and Taki Wise.

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