George Izo

George William Izo (born September 20, 1937) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins, as well as the St. Louis Cardinals, Detroit Lions, and the Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame.

George Izo
No. 3, 15
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:September 20, 1937 (age 81)
Barberton, Ohio
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school:Barberton High School
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1960 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
AFL draft:1960 / Round: 1 / Pick: territorial
(by the New York Titans)
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:26
TD/INT:12/32
Passing yards:1,791
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Izo was born in Barberton, Ohio and attended Barberton High School, where he played high school football. During his junior and senior seasons he was honored as an All-American and All-State selection, and was named Player of the Year by the Akron Beacon Journal. Izo still holds the school record for the most yards per completion. He also played defensive back and caught six interceptions during his senior year.

College career

Izo attended and played college football at the University of Notre Dame. His father, George Izo Sr., also played at Notre Dame under coach Knute Rockne.[1] During his college career, he threw for 2,095 yards and 18 touchdowns, and led the Irish to a 20-19 upset of the University of Iowa in his next to last game.[2]

Izo earned his varsity letter during his sophomore year, but during the off-season he sprained his ankle during initiation into the Monogram Club. He missed spring practice and did not return to the field until mid-season of his junior year.[1] The off-season before Izo's senior year, coach Joe Kuharich decided to install a T formation offense. The week before the first game of his senior season, he appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated. However, the Tuesday before the game he hurt his knee in practice and missed the first two games of that season[1] (an early example of the Sports Illustrated cover jinx urban legend.) Still, that year he was named to the Coaches All-American Team, started in the Chicago College All-Star Game against the Baltimore Colts, and played in the East–West Shrine Game.[3]

Izo graduated with a degree in Business Administration.[3]

Professional career

Izo played in a total of 26 games and completed 132 passes in 317 attempts for 1,791 yards, 12 touchdowns and 32 interceptions.

NFL & AFL Drafts

Izo was drafted in the first round (second overall) of the 1960 NFL Draft by the Chicago Cardinals. He was also chosen in the 1960 American Football League Draft as a "territorial selection" by the Titans of New York (now New York Jets).[4] To begin the draft, each of the eight AFL teams received one territorial/bonus selection to help ensure every team had a regional draw to help the financial success of each franchise. These regional picks did not occur in any order. Instead, they were unanimously agreed upon by the other teams.[5]

St. Louis Cardinals

Izo chose the Cardinals over the AFL, and signed his $15,000 contract at Soldier Field in Chicago during a game against the Chicago Bears game. The franchise moved to St. Louis, Missouri one month after Izo signed his contract. In 1960, he won the starting job for the Cardinals by the third game of the season. But, he re-injured the same knee that he hurt in college and underwent surgery.[3] Izo was traded at the end of training camp in 1961.

Washington Redskins

On September 12, 1961, Izo was traded to the Washington Redskins for quarterback Ralph Guglielmi.[3] The Redskins wanted him as a back up to Norm Snead, the Wake Forest quarterback the Redskins drafted second overall in the 1961 NFL Draft.[6] On September 15, 1963, stepping in for Snead, he threw a 99-yard touchdown pass to Bobby Mitchell, which tied a franchise and league record. Coincidentally, the first two occurrences of a 99-yard pass play featured Redskins' quarterbacks. In 1964, the Redskins traded Snead to the Philadelphia Eagles for quarterback Sonny Jurgensen and after backing him up for one year, Izo asked to be traded.[6]

Detroit Lions

In 1965, the Detroit Lions traded guard Darrell Dess to the Redskins for Izo and guard Ted Karras. During his only year in Detroit, Izo backed up Milt Plum and the Lions won six games. He was released by the Lions on September 5, 1966.

Pittsburgh Steelers

After his release from the Lions, Izo worked out for and was signed to the Pittsburgh Steelers' roster on September 24, 1966. He played in four games during his time in Pittsburgh and was released on November 2, 1966.

Personal life

After retiring from football in 1967, Izo moved to the Bahamas and participated in a business venture that built condominiums.[2] While living there, he coached high school football at Freeport Anglican High School. He moved back to Washington, D.C. five years later and became a partner in a wholesale food company; he has worked in the food industry regularly ever since.[2][6]

In 2012, Izo joined the Knights of Columbus.[7] He now lives in Alexandria, Virginia with Anita Mann. He has three children. Eric and Amy by Anita and Lillie, with his first wife Deborah.

Military tours

Starting in the late 1990s after moving to California, Izo took former NFL stars to military bases in South Korea, Japan and Guam in his role as business development manager for California Sunshine milk, which had a contract with the U.S. government. He has made tours with Billy Kilmer, Ken Stabler, Paul Hornung and Earl Morrall, among others.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b c "The Big Question About George Izo". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2011-08-05.
  2. ^ a b c d "George Izo, Quarterback". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2011-08-03.
  3. ^ a b c d "1963 Football Facts Book – Washington Redskins" (PDF). Washington Redskins. Retrieved 2011-08-05.
  4. ^ "New York Jets History: Year in Review – 1959". New York Jets. Retrieved 2011-08-03.
  5. ^ "The AFL's first draft". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2011-08-03.
  6. ^ a b c "Sonny, Billy & the Boys: Greatest Redskins Quarterbacks". Washingtonian. Retrieved 2011-08-06.
  7. ^ [Added by Witness of Induction Ceremony, which took place 04/19/2012]

External links

Bunny Belden

Charles William Belden (December 7, 1900 – November 1976) was an American football player. He played for the Duluth Eskimos and Chicago Cardinals. He played college football for Saint Mary's College of California.

Cliff Stoudt

Clifford Lewis Stoudt (born March 27, 1955) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Phoenix Cardinals, Miami Dolphins and Dallas Cowboys. He also was a member of the Birmingham Stallions of the United States Football League. He was drafted in the fifth round (121st overall) by the Steelers. He played college football at Youngstown State University.

Don Hill (American football)

Donald Kinman Hill (September 18, 1904 – February 9, 1967) was an American football player. He played in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1929 season with the Chicago Cardinals and the Green Bay Packers.

Gary Keithley

Gary Keithley (born January 11, 1951) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League. Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, he had a 0.0 passer rating in each of his first two career starts, the only quarterback in NFL history to do this in back-to-back games. He was the backup quarterback of the BC Lions in 1977 and 1978.

Hugh McCullough

Hugh Warner McCullough (May 18, 1916 – February 11, 1999) was an American football player who played five seasons in the National Football League (NFL). During his time in the NFL, McCullough played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (later renamed the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1940), Chicago Cardinals, Philadelphia-Pittsburgh Steagles and the Boston Yanks.

Jack Robbins

Jack William Robbins (January 23, 1916 – January 1983) was an American football halfback who played two seasons in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Cardinals. Robbins also played quarterback during his two years in the NFL.

Robbins played college football and basketball at the University of Arkansas before being drafted into the NFL Draft in 1938, where he was the first of four Arkansas Razorbacks drafted.

Jim Hardy

James Francis Hardy (born April 24, 1923) is a former American football quarterback. He was born in Los Angeles.

John Grigas

John Joseph Grigas (August 19, 1920 – May 19, 2000) was an American football player. He played college football for the Holy Cross Crusaders football team from 1940 to 1942 and professional football in the National Football League (NFL) from 1943 to 1947. He was selected as a second-team All-American in 1941, a first-team All-NFL player in 1944, and led the NFL in all-purpose yards in 1944.

Kent Graham

Kent Douglas Graham (born November 1, 1968) is a former American football quarterback. Graham played quarterback at the University of Notre Dame before transferring to Ohio State University. After his college football career, Graham had a lengthy career in the National Football League (NFL) during which he played for the New York Giants in two separate stints, as well as starting for the Arizona Cardinals and the Pittsburgh Steelers. He finished his career in 2002 with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

List of Detroit Lions starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Lions.

Max Fiske (American football)

Max Joseph Fiske (September 27, 1913 – March 15, 1973) was an American football player for the Pittsburgh Pirates, now the Pittsburgh Steelers.

In 1977, he was inducted into the Roseland Pullman Sports Hall of Fame.

Mike Loyd

Charles Michael Loyd (born May 4, 1956) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He was with the St. Louis Cardinals (1979–1980). He would appear in five games during the 1980 NFL season and start one game. Is currently the head football coach at Rogers High School in Rogers, Arkansas. Has also coached local legend Case Hampton for one year.

Ogden Compton

Ogden Bingham Compton (born August 25, 1932) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Cardinals. He played college football for Hardin–Simmons.

On November 13, 1955, Compton threw the only touchdown pass of his NFL career, a completion to Dick "Night Train" Lane that covered 98 yards, the second longest pass in NFL history up to that time.

Pat Coffee

James Lilburn "Pat" Coffee (August 3, 1915 – January 25, 1986) was a professional American football halfback and quarterback in the National Football League (NFL). He played for the Chicago Cardinals in 1937 and 1938. He set an NFL record in 1937 with the Cardinals with a 97-yard touchdown pass to receiver Gaynell Tinsley.

Roddy Lamb

Roy Elmer Lamb (August 20, 1899 – December 21, 1995) was an American football player for the Rock Island Independents and Chicago Cardinals. He played college football for Lombard College.

Stoney Case

Stoney Jarrod Case (born July 7, 1972 in Odessa, Texas) is a former quarterback for three teams in the National Football League and three teams in the Arena Football League.

Todd Hons

Todd Hank Hons (born September 5, 1961) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League and Arena Football League. He played for the Detroit Lions and Detroit Drive. He played college football for the Arizona State Sun Devils.

Tom Dublinski

Thomas Eugene Dublinski (August 8, 1930 – November 26, 2015) was a professional American football quarterback who played in five NFL seasons from 1952–1960 for 3 different teams including the Detroit Lions. He also saw playing time in the Canadian Football League with the Toronto Argonauts and Hamilton Tiger-Cats. Dublinski died on Thanksgiving Day, November 26, 2015.

Virgil Eikenberg

Charles Virgil Eikenberg (February 22, 1924 – January 30, 1987) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Cardinals. He played college football for the Louisville Cardinals and Rice Owls.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.