George Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol

George William Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol (31 August 1721 – 18? or 20? March 1775), the eldest son of John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey, by his marriage with Mary (1700–1768), daughter of Nicholas Lepell.[1]

Lord Bristol served for some years in the army, and in 1755 was sent to Turin as envoy extraordinary. He was ambassador at Madrid from 1758 to 1761, filling a difficult position with credit and dignity, and ranked among the followers of Pitt.[1]

Appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1766, he never visited that country during his short tenure of this office, and, after having served for a short time as keeper of the Privy Seal, became groom of the stole to George III in January 1770. He died unmarried, and was succeeded by his brother.[1]

Zoffany - George William Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol
Earl of Bristol

References

  1. ^ a b c Wikisource Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Bristol, Earls and Marquesses of" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Unknown
British Minister at Turin
1755–1758
Succeeded by
James Mackenzie
Preceded by
Benjamin Keene
British Ambassador to Spain
1758–1761
Vacant
No representation due to war
Title next held by
The Earl of Rochford
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Hertford
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1766
Succeeded by
The Viscount Townshend
Preceded by
The Earl of Chatham
Lord Privy Seal
1768–1770
Succeeded by
The Earl of Halifax
Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Hervey
Earl of Bristol
1751–1775
Succeeded by
Augustus John Hervey
1721

1721 (MDCCXXI)

was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1721st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 721st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1721, the Gregorian calendar was

11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1721 in Great Britain

Events from the year 1721 in Great Britain.

August 31

August 31 is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 122 days remaining until the end of the year.

Benjamin Keene

Sir Benjamin Keene, KB, (1697, King's Lynn, Norfolk, England – 1757, Madrid) was a British diplomat known for his service as British Ambassador to Spain. He strove to maintain good relations between the two countries, but was unable to prevent the War of Jenkins' Ear breaking out in 1739. He later successfully kept Spain neutral when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756. At the height of his powers he wielded wide influence over events in Spain, and was in the confidence of leading Spanish statesmen.

Groom of the Stool

The Groom of the Stool (formally styled: "Groom of the King's Close Stool") was the most intimate of an English monarch's courtiers, responsible for assisting the king in excretion and ablution.

The physical intimacy of the role naturally led to his becoming a man in whom much confidence was placed by his royal master and with whom many royal secrets were shared as a matter of course. This secret information—while it would never have been revealed, to the discredit of his honour—in turn led to his becoming feared and respected and therefore powerful within the royal court in his own right. The office developed gradually over decades and centuries into one of administration of the royal finances, and under Henry VII, the Groom of the Stool became a powerful official involved in setting national fiscal policy, under the "chamber system".

Hervey

Hervey is both an English surname and a masculine given name, probably derived from French Hervé. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Lord Alfred Hervey (1816–1875), English politician

Lord Arthur Hervey (1808–1894), English bishop

Arthur Hervey (1855–1922), Irish composer and author

Augustus Hervey, 3rd Earl of Bristol (1724–1779), English admiral and politician

Lord Augustus Hervey (1837–1875), English politician

Lord Charles Hervey (1814–1880), English clergyman and cricketer

Dick Hervey (1920-2014), American businessman, university administrator, and politician

Edward Hervey (born 1973), retired Canadian football player

Lord Francis Hervey (1846–1931), English barrister and politician

Frederick Hervey (disambiguation), several people

George Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol (1721–1775), English soldier, diplomat and courtier

Geraldine Hervey, Marchioness of Bristol

Herbert Hervey, 5th Marquess of Bristol (1870–1960), English diplomat

Irene Hervey (1909–1998), American television and film actress

Lady Isabella Hervey (born 1982), English socialite, model, and actress

James Hervey (1714–1758), English clergyman and writer

James Hervey (physician) (1751?–1824), English physician and pioneer of smallpox vaccination

Jason Hervey (born 1972), American actor, television producer and former public relations agent

John Hervey (disambiguation), several people

Lady Mary Hervey (1700–1768), née Lepell, English courtier

Matt Hervey (born 1966), American former professional ice hockey player

Lord Nicholas Hervey (1961–1998), English aristocrat and monarchist

Robert Hervey (1820-unknown), Scottish-Canadian-American lawyer

Thomas Kibble Hervey (1799–1859), British poet and critic

Victor Hervey, 6th Marquess of Bristol, (1915–1985), English aristocrat, monarchist and businessman

Lady Victoria Hervey (born 1976), English model, socialite and TV personality

Walter Lowrie Hervey (1862–1952), American educator

William Hervey, 1st Baron Hervey (died 1642), English soldier and politician

Sir William Hervey (1586-1660), English politician

Wilna Hervey (1894-1979), American silent film actress and artist

Winifred Hervey (born 1955), American television producer and screenwriterGiven name:

Hervey le Breton (died 1131), Breton cleric

Hervey de Keith (died c.1198), Marischal of Scotland

Hervey de Stanton (1260–1327), English judge

Hervey C. Calkin (1828–1913), American politician

Hervey White (1866–1944), American writer and poet

Hervey Tudway (1888–1914), English cricketer

Hervey Allen (1889–1949), American writer

Hervey Rhodes, Baron Rhodes (1895–1987), English politician

Hervey M. Cleckley (1903–1984), American psychiatrist

Hervey Machen (1916–1994), American politician

List of ambassadors of the United Kingdom to Spain

The Ambassador of the United Kingdom to Spain is the United Kingdom's foremost diplomatic representative in the Kingdom of Spain, and in charge of the UK's diplomatic mission in Spain. The official title is Her Britannic Majesty's Ambassador to the Kingdom of Spain.

The British ambassador to Spain is also non-resident ambassador to the Principality of Andorra.

In 1822, Foreign Secretary George Canning downgraded the Embassy to a Mission, and the Head of Mission from an Ambassador to an Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, to reflect Spain's decreased importance on the world stage. The Mission in Madrid was upgraded to a full Embassy once more on 9 December 1887.

Lord Privy Seal

The Lord Privy Seal (or, more formally, the Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal) is the fifth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord President of the Council and above the Lord Great Chamberlain. Originally, its holder was responsible for the monarch's personal (privy) seal (as opposed to the Great Seal of the Realm, which is in the care of the Lord Chancellor) until the use of such a seal became obsolete. The office is currently one of the traditional sinecure offices of state. Today, the holder of the office is invariably given a seat in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

Though one of the oldest offices in government anywhere, it has no particular function today because the use of a privy seal has been obsolete for centuries; thus the office has generally been used as a kind of minister without portfolio. Since the premiership of Clement Attlee, the position of Lord Privy Seal has frequently been combined with that of Leader of the House of Lords or Leader of the House of Commons. The office of Lord Privy Seal, unlike those of Leader of the Lords or Commons, is eligible for a ministerial salary under the Ministerial and other Salaries Act 1975. The office does not confer membership of the House of Lords, leading to Ernest Bevin's remark on holding this office that he was "neither a Lord, nor a Privy, nor a Seal".During the reign of Edward I, prior to 1307, the Privy Seal was kept by the Controller of the Wardrobe. The Lord Privy Seal was the president of the Court of Requests during its existence.

William Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford

William Henry Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford, KG, PC (17 September 1717 O.S. – 29 September 1781) was a British courtier, diplomat and statesman of Anglo-Dutch descent. He occupied senior ambassadorial posts at Madrid and Paris, and served as Secretary of State in both the Northern and Southern Departments. He is credited with the earliest-known introduction of the Lombardy poplar to England in 1754.He was a personal friend of such major cultural figures as the actor David Garrick, the novelist Laurence Sterne, and the French playwright Beaumarchais. George III valued Rochford as his expert advisor on foreign affairs in the early 1770s, and as a loyal and hard-working cabinet minister. Rochford was the only British secretary of state between 1760 and 1778 who had been a career diplomat.

Rochford played key roles in the Manila Ransom negotiation with Spain (1763–66), the French acquisition of Corsica (1768), the Falkland Islands crisis of 1770–1, the crisis following the Swedish Revolution of 1772, and the aftermath of the Royal Marriages Act of 1772. In addition to his work as foreign secretary, he carried a heavy burden of domestic responsibilities in the early 1770s, especially Irish affairs. He was a key member of the North administration in the early phase of the American War of Independence. Illness and a political scandal forced him from office in November 1775.

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