George Cumby

George Edward Cumby (born July 5, 1956) is a former American football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons during the 1980s. He played college football for the University of Oklahoma, and was a three-time All-American. A first-round pick in the 1980 NFL Draft, Cumby played professionally for the Green Bay Packers, Buffalo Bills, and Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL. He was an assistant football coach for Bishop Thomas K. Gorman Catholic School in Tyler, Texas. Since August 2016, he has been director of recruitment at Jacksonville College (TX).[1]

George Cumby
No. 52
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:July 5, 1956 (age 62)
Gorman, Texas
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school:Tyler (TX) Bishop Gorman
College:Oklahoma
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 26
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • 2× Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year (1977, 1978)
  • 3× All-American (1977, 1978, 1979)
  • 1× Second-team All-Pro (1982)
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Cumby is African-American.[2] He was born in Gorman, Texas. He graduated from Bishop Thomas K. Gorman Catholic School in Tyler, Texas in 1975.[3]

College career

He attended the University of Oklahoma, where he played for the Oklahoma Sooners football team from 1976 to 1979. He was a three-time first-team All-American (1977, 1978, 1979), being a consensus first-team selection in 1979. With a combination of speed and strength he is considered one of the top defensive players of all time at Oklahoma. He was also named Defensive Newcomer of the Year and Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year twice—in 1978 and 1979. Cumby was described by then-head coach Barry Switzer as "the only person I know who could go one-on-one with Earl Campbell and knock him backwards." He finished his career at Oklahoma with 405 career tackles, fifth on the all-time list.[4]

Professional career

He was taken in the first round by the Green Bay Packers in the 1980 NFL Draft as the 26th overall pick. He started two games as a rookie and moved into the full-time starting position in 1981 when he intercepted a career-high three passes and in 1982 Cumby was a Second-team All-Pro selection. He remained a starter though 1984 and was then relegated to backup duty in 1985.[5]

In the 1985 season Cumby gained national attention in a negative way. When rookie defensive tackle William Perry was put in the offensive lineup for the Chicago Bears it was Cumby who was twice "flattened" by Perry on lead blocks for Walter Payton.[6] Later in that season, Cumby was beaten on a short pass route by Perry that the "Fridge" carried into the end zone, again an embarrassment for Cumby.[7]

Cumby was cut by the Packers the following preseason on August 18, 1986,[8] and subsequently signed by the Buffalo Bills.[9] Cumby was a starter in 8 of the 11 games he played in 1986. He played one game for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1987 when he was signed to bolster an injury-weakened linebacking corps.[10]

Post-playing career

After his NFL career, Cumby was the coach at his high school alma mater, Bishop Thomas K. Gorman Catholic School, for the 2006 school year, and was recently the linebackers coach at Tyler Junior College. He was the head football coach at Texas College for three seasons until August 2014.[11] He also coaches at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler, Texas

References

  1. ^ Correspondent, Doc Smith Sports. "Former NFL star takes reins at JC as director of recruitment". Daily Progress Jacksonville, TX. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  2. ^ http://archive.jsonline.com/sports/packers/81235977.html/
  3. ^ "Former NFL star takes reins at JC as director of recruitment". Jacksonville Progress. August 13, 2016.
  4. ^ Sooner Sports.com Archived May 23, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Pro Football Reference.com
  6. ^ The Bears' march to Super Bowl XLI Chicago Sun-Times, October 28, 2006.
  7. ^ PERRY EVEN CONVERTS PACKER COACH Chicago Tribune, November 4, 1985.
  8. ^ "Bills trade Cribbs to 49ers, welcome the arrival of Kelly" Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 19, 1986.
  9. ^ "Around the camps" St. Petersburg Times, September 3, 1986.
  10. ^ A FINAL CHANCE FOR SUB EAGLES Philadelphia Inquirer, October 18, 1987.
  11. ^ Texas College Hires George Cumby
1976 Fiesta Bowl

The 1976 Fiesta Bowl matched the Oklahoma Sooners and the Wyoming Cowboys.

1977 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1977 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. The selectors for the 1977 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1977 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1977 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. Oklahoma was a member of the Big Eight Conference and played its home games in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted a 10–2 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference title under head coach Barry Switzer who took the helm in 1973. This was Switzer's fifth conference title and third undefeated conference record in five seasons.The team was led by All-Americans George Cumby, Daryl Hunt, Reggie Kinlaw, and Zac Henderson Cumby was named Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year. After winning the conference title outright, it earned a trip to the Orange Bowl where it lost to Arkansas Razorbacks. During the season, it faced five ranked opponents (In order, #4 Ohio State, #5 Texas, #16 Iowa State, #11 Nebraska, and #6 Arkansas). Four of its opponents ended the season ranked. It endured its only regular season defeat in the Red River Shootout against Texas. The Sooners started the season with a four consecutive wins before losing to Texas and then won the next six before their unsuccessful bowl game.Elvis Peacock led the team in rushing with 812 yards, Dean Blevins led the team in passing with 385 yards, Steve Rhodes led the team in receiving with 272 yards, Uwe von Schamann led the team in scoring with 89 points, Hunt led the team in tackles with 159 tackles and Henderson posted 7 interceptions.

1978 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1978 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1978 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1979 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1979 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1979 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the college football 1979 NCAA Division I-A season. Oklahoma Sooners football participated in the former Big Eight Conference at that time and played its home games in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted an 11–1 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference title outright under head coach Barry Switzer who took the helm in 1973. This was Switzer's seventh conference title and fourth undefeated conference record in seven seasons.The team was led by All-Americans Billy Sims and George Cumby. After winning the conference title outright, it earned a trip to the Orange Bowl for a bout with Florida State. During the season, it faced three different ranked opponents (In order, #4 Texas, #3 Nebraska and #4 Florida State). All three of these opponents finished the season ranked. It endured its only defeat of the season against Texas in the Red River Shootout. The Sooners started the season with a four consecutive wins before losing to Texas and then won their remaining seven games. Sims and J.C. Watts both posted for 100-yard games in the Orange Bowl.Sims led the nation in scoring with 138 points (based on per game average of 12.0, which includes 132 in 11 games). Sims led the team in rushing with 1670 yards, Watts led the team in passing with 821 yards, Freddie Nixon led the team in receiving with 293 yards, Cumby led the team with 160 tackles and Bud Hebert posted 4 interceptions. Billy Sims set numerous Oklahoma offensive records that still stand including career 200-yard games, single-season rushing touchdowns (tied)

1980 Green Bay Packers season

The 1980 Green Bay Packers season was their 62nd season overall and their 60th in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–10–1 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fifth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1982 All-Pro Team

The 1982 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League (NFL) players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly in 1982. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Sporting News did not choose a 1982 All-Pro team due to the players' strike.

1982 Green Bay Packers season

The 1982 Green Bay Packers season was their 64th season overall and their 62nd season in the National Football League and shortened due to a players strike. The club posted a 5–3–1 record under coach Bart Starr. Due to the strike, the NFL ignored division standing and placed eight teams from each conference into the playoffs. The Packers finished the season in third place which earned them a playoff berth. The Packers beat the Cardinals 41–16 in the first round, but lost to the Dallas Cowboys 37–26 in the second. Their playoff berth was the first for the Packers in ten seasons, and their only playoff win from 1968 to 1992.

The strike prevented both games of the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league. It also led to Milwaukee becoming the Packers primary home by happenstance, as three of their four regular season home games were played at Milwaukee County Stadium.

1983 Green Bay Packers season

The 1983 Green Bay Packers season was their 65th season overall and their 63rd in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under ninth-year head coach Bart Starr to finish second in the NFC Central division. The team set an NFL record for most overtime games played in one season with five, winning two and losing three. On Monday Night Football in October, Green Bay defeated the Washington Redskins, 48–47, in the highest-scoring game in MNF history. It was voted one of the ten best Packer games and is featured on the NFL Films collection, "The Green Bay Packers Greatest Games."

Green Bay hovered around the .500 mark all season. Entering their final regular season game on December 18 at Chicago, the Packers (8–7) could secure a playoff berth with a victory. Green Bay scored a touchdown to take a one-point lead with just over three minutes in the game, and Chicago running back Walter Payton was sidelined with a wrist injury. The Bears returned the kickoff to their 38 and drove fifty yards, down to the Packer twelve, with 1:17 remaining. Although Green Bay had all three of its timeouts, they opted not to use any, and the Bears kicked a winning 22-yard field goal with ten seconds on the clock. Green Bay fumbled away the ensuing kickoff, and the Los Angeles Rams (9–7) gained the final playoff slot.Starr was fired the following day by team president Robert Parins, ending a 26-year association with the team as a player and coach. Former player Forrest Gregg, the head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals, was hired before the end of the week, announced on Christmas Eve. Gregg had led the Bengals to Super Bowl XVI two years earlier, but had less success in his four seasons in Green Bay, then left for his alma mater SMU in Dallas in January 1988.

1984 Green Bay Packers season

The 1984 Green Bay Packers season was their 66th season overall and their 64th in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under new coach Forrest Gregg, earning them a second-place finish in the NFC Central division.

Alexander Durley

Alexander Durley was an American college football coach, college athletics administrator, and mathematics professor. He served as the head football coach at Texas College from 1942 to 1948, at Texas Southern University from 1949 to 1964, and at Prairie View A&M University from 1969 to 1970. He was inducted into the Southwestern Athletic Conference Hall of Fame in 1992.

Big Eight Conference football

The Big Eight Conference is a defunct college athletic conference that was formerly affiliated with the NCAA's Division I-A (now known as FBS).

The Big Eight Conference was a successful football conference, with its member schools being recognized as consensus national champion on eleven occasions, including the last two football seasons the conference existed (1994 and 1995). Seven players from the Big Eight won the Heisman Trophy, the most prestigious national award for college football players.

Bishop Thomas K. Gorman Catholic School

Bishop Thomas K. Gorman Catholic School is a parochial Catholic high school and middle school in Tyler, Texas, United States. It is located in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tyler.

Cumby (surname)

Cumby is a surname, and may refer to:

George Cumby (born 1956), former NFL football player

William Pryce Cumby (1771–1837), officer in the Royal Navy

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Oklahoma Sooners football All-Americans

This is a list of Oklahoma Sooners college football players who were named first team All-Americans. The selecting organizations for football All-Americans that the NCAA recognizes include the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation. The NCAA defines consensus All-Americans as players who were accorded a majority of votes at their positions by these selectors. Unanimous All-Americans are players who were selected by all five selectors.Oklahoma has had 162 first team All-Americans in its history. 80 of these were consensus, and 35 were unanimous. OU has the most unanimous All-Americans in the history of college football.

Oklahoma Sooners football statistical leaders

The Oklahoma Sooners football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oklahoma Sooners football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Sooners represent the University of Oklahoma in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Oklahoma began competing in intercollegiate football in 1895, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1946, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Sooners have played in a bowl game every year since then, giving players since 2002 an additional game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Sooners have played in the Big 12 Championship Game 10 times since 2000.

The Sooners eclipsed 5,000 total offensive yards as a team all but twice (for a total of 16 times) during the tenure of Bob Stoops as head coach from 1999 to 2016, and did so again during the first two seasons of current head coach Lincoln Riley in 2017 and 2018. Oklahoma had only done this eight times before Stoops' arrival. In addition, the 2017 and 2018 seasons marked the 11th and 12th times the Sooners accumulated over 6,000 yards, with the other 10 times occurring during Stoops' tenure as head coach. The team had never accomplished this feat before Stoops took over.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Warren Harper

Warren Harper (c. 1932 – July 24, 1997) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Texas Western College—now the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)—from 1963 to 1964, compiling a record of 3–15–2. Harper began his coaching career at the high school level in Texas, where he coached at Sherman High School and Amarillo High School. He was an assistant at the University of Oklahoma from 1968 to 1982, where he coached linebackers such as Rod Shoate, George Cumby, and Daryl Hunt.

Offense
Defense
Special teams

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