George Alec Effinger

George Alec Effinger (January 10, 1947 – April 27, 2002) was an American science fiction author, born in Cleveland, Ohio.

George Alec Effinger
BornJanuary 10, 1947
Cleveland, Ohio
DiedApril 27, 2002 (aged 55)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Pen nameO. Niemand, Susan Doenim
Occupationnovelist, short story writer
Genrescience fiction
Literary movementcyberpunk
Notable worksWhen Gravity Fails

Writing career

Effinger was a part of the Clarion class of 1970 and had three stories in the first Clarion anthology. His first published story was "The Eight-Thirty to Nine Slot" in Fantastic in 1971. During his early period, he also published under a variety of pseudonyms.

His first novel, What Entropy Means to Me (1972), was nominated for the Nebula Award. He achieved his greatest success with the trilogy of Marîd Audran novels set in a 22nd-century Middle East, with cybernetic implants and modules allowing individuals to change their personalities or bodies. The novels are in fact set in a thinly veiled version of the French Quarter of New Orleans. The three published novels were When Gravity Fails (1987), A Fire in the Sun (1989), and The Exile Kiss (1991); Effinger also contributed to the computer game Circuit's Edge (1990), set between the first two books. He began a fourth Budayeen novel, Word of Night, but completed only the first two chapters. Those two chapters were reprinted in the anthology Budayeen Nights (2003) which has all of Effinger's short material from the Marîd Audran setting.

His novelette "Schrödinger's Kitten" (1988) received both the Hugo and the Nebula Award, as well as the Japanese Seiun Award. A collection of his stories was published posthumously in 2005, entitled George Alec Effinger Live! From Planet Earth; includes the complete stories Effinger wrote under the pseudonym "O. Niemand" and many of Effinger's best-known stories. Each O. Niemand story is a pastiche in the voice of a different major American writer (Flannery O'Connor, Damon Runyon, Mark Twain, etc.), all set on the asteroid city of Springfield. "Niemand" is from the German word for "nobody", and the initial O was intended by Effinger as a visual pun for Zero, and possibly also as a reference to the author O. Henry.

Other stories he wrote were the series of Maureen (Muffy) Birnbaum parodies, which placed a preppy into a variety of science fictional, fantasy, and horror scenarios.

He made brief forays into writing comic books in the early 1970s, mostly in Marvel Comics' science fiction, fantasy, and horror titles; and again in the late 1980s, including the first issue of a series of his own creation entitled Neil and Buzz in Space & Time, about two fictional astronauts who travel to the edge of the universe to find it contains nothing but an ocean planet with a replica of a small New Jersey town on its only island. The first issue was the only issue, and the story ended on a cliffhanger. It was released by Fantagraphics.[1] He also wrote a story based in the Zork universe.

Personal life

Effinger was known to close friends as "Piglet", a nickname from his youth which he later came to dislike.[2]

Throughout his life, Effinger suffered from health problems. These resulted in enormous medical bills which he was unable to pay, resulting in a declaration of bankruptcy. Because Louisiana's system of law descends from the Napoleonic Code rather than English Common Law, the possibility existed that copyrights to Effinger's works and characters might revert to his creditors, in this case the hospital. However, no representative of the hospital showed up at the bankruptcy hearing, and Effinger regained the rights to all his intellectual property.[3]

Effinger suffered a hearing loss of about 70% due to childhood infections, only helped about the last 10 years of his life by hearing aids. He did not drive most of his life, and only got a driver's license at about age 39 for check-cashing purposes.

Effinger met his first wife Diana in the 1960s. He was married from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s to artist Beverly K. Effinger, and from 1998 to 2000 to fellow science fiction author Barbara Hambly.[4] He died in New Orleans, Louisiana.[5]

Works

Novels (non-series)

  • What Entropy Means to Me (1972)
  • Relatives (1973)
  • Nightmare Blue (1975) (with Gardner Dozois)
  • Felicia (1976)
  • Those Gentle Voices: A Promethean Romance of the Spaceways (1976)
  • Death in Florence (1978) (aka Utopia 3)
  • Heroics (1979)
  • The Wolves of Memory (1981)
  • Shadow Money (1988)
  • The Red Tape War (1990) (with Mike Resnick and Jack L. Chalker)
  • The Zork Chronicles (1990)
  • Look Away (1990) (novella)
  • Schrödinger's Kitten (1992)
  • Trinity: Hope Sacrifice Unity
  • The League of Dragons: A Castle Falkenstein Novel (1998)

Nick of Time series

  • The Nick of Time (1985)
  • The Bird of Time (1986)

Marîd Audran series

Planet of the Apes Television series adaptations

  • Man the Fugitive (1974)
  • Escape to Tomorrow (1975)
  • Journey Into Terror (1975)
  • Lord of the Apes (1976)

Collections

  • Mixed Feelings (1974)
  • Irrational Numbers (1976)
  • Dirty Tricks (1978)
  • Idle Pleasures (1983) (science fiction sports stories)
  • Author's Choice Monthly Issue 1: The Old Funny Stuff (1989)
  • Maureen Birnbaum, Barbarian Swordsperson (1993)
  • George Alec Effinger Live! From Planet Earth (2005)
    • stories selected and introduced by friends, fellow writers and editors
  • A Thousand Deaths (2007)
    • the novel The Wolves of Memory plus 7 additional Sandor Courane stories (6 uncollected)

Short stories

Comics

  • "Wasteland — on a Weirdling World" (featuring Gullivar Jones, Warrior of Mars), Creatures on the Loose #18 (Marvel, July 1972)
  • "The Long Road to Nowhere" (featuring Gullivar Jones), Creatures on the Loose #19 (Marvel, September 1972)
  • "Moon of Madness, Moon of Fear!", Chamber of Chills #1 (Marvel, November 1972)
  • "What Price Victory?" (featuring Gullivar Jones), Creatures on the Loose #20 (Marvel, November 1972)
  • "More Than Blood!", Journey into Mystery #2 (Marvel, December 1972)
  • "Two Worlds to Win!" (featuring Gullivar Jones), Creatures on the Loose #21 (Marvel, January 1973)
  • "All the Shapes of Fear!", Chamber of Chills #3 (Marvel, March 1973)
  • "Thongor! Warrior of Lost Lemuria!" (featuring Thongor! Warrior of Lost Lemuria!), Creatures on the Loose #22 (Marvel, March 1973)
  • "Where Broods the Demon!" (featuring Thongor), Creatures on the Loose #23 (Marvel, May 1973)
  • "Red Swords, Black Wings!" (featuring Thongor), Creatures on the Loose #24 (Marvel, July 1973)
  • "The Wizard of Lemuria!" (featuring Thongor), Creatures on the Loose #25 (Marvel, September 1973)
  • "The Mouse Alone!" (featuring the Young Gray Mouser), Sword of Sorcery #5 (Marvel, Nov.-Dec. 1973)
  • "Heartstop," Haunt of Horror #1 (Marvel, May 1974)
  • "More Than Blood!" in Doomsday #17 (K. G. Murray, July 1974)
  • "All the World Wars at Once!", Fantastic Four #161 (Marvel, August 1975)
  • Neil and Buzz in Space and Time #1 (Fantagraphics, April 1989)

Note: The titles of the first two books of the Marîd Audran series are both taken from Bob Dylan lyrics. "When Gravity Fails" is from the song "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" and "A Fire in the Sun" from "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue". Permission was denied to use a Dylan quote again for the third book's title, so Effinger chose instead a public domain quote from Shakespeare.

References

Notes
  1. ^ Comic Book Database, entry on Neil and Buzz.... accessed July 29th, 2010
  2. ^ "Briefs and Links: Deaths: George Alec Effinger" Locus Online News Log April 28, 2002
  3. ^ [George Alec Effinger, Live! From Planet Earth, introduction to story "My Old Man".]
  4. ^ "Authors : Effinger, George Alec : SFE : Science Fiction Encyclopedia". www.sf-encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  5. ^ George Effinger, 55, Who Laced Science Fiction With Dark Humor New York Times May 2, 2002
Sources

External links

A Fire in the Sun

A Fire in the Sun is a cyberpunk science fiction novel by American writer George Alec Effinger, published in 1989. It is the second novel in the three-book Marîd Audran series, following the events of When Gravity Fails, and concentrating on Marîd's experience as he becomes the main lieutenant of Friedlander Bey's business empire while realising that his new master has darker aspects than he suspected.

The title of the novel comes from "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", a song by Bob Dylan: "Yonder stands your orphan with his gun / crying like a fire in the sun".

Alpha 5 (Robert Silverberg anthology)

Alpha 5 is a science fiction anthology edited by American writer Robert Silverberg, first published in 1974.

Alpha 7 (Robert Silverberg anthology)

Alpha 7 is a science fiction anthology edited by Robert Silverberg first published in 1977.

Budayeen Nights

Budayeen Nights is a collection of cyberpunk science fiction short stories and novelettes by George Alec Effinger, published in 2003. The work consists of nine individual stories by Effinger, with a foreword and story introductions by Barbara Hambly. Seven of the nine stories had been published previously in other forms, such as magazines, while one consists of the first two chapters of Word of Night, which was to be the fourth book in the Marîd Audran series, following The Exile Kiss.Budayeen Nights was published posthumously; Effinger having died in April 2002. The paperback edition was released in September 2008.

Double dribble (disambiguation)

A double dribble is an illegal move in basketball.

Double dribble may also refer to:

Double Dribble (video game), a 1986 arcade game by Konami

Double Dribble: The Playoff Edition, a 1994 sequel

Double Dribble (film), a 1946 Disney theatrical cartoon short

Double Dribble, a 1992 album by Miles Donahue produced by Timeless Records

Double Dribble, a 1999 book by Canadian Sylvia McNicoll

“Double Dribble”, a short story by George Alec Effinger in the 1990 anthology The Further Adventures of The Joker

“Double Dribble”, a 2017 single by Wiwek

The Double Dribble, a former show produced by American entertainment website Double Toasted

Goat Song (novelette)

"Goat Song" is a science fiction novelette by American writer Poul Anderson. Originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction issue of February 1972, it was later included in the anthologies Nebula Award Stories Eight and The Hugo Winners Volume 3.This story has strong parallels to the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice

Golden Gryphon Press

Golden Gryphon Press is an independent publishing company, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, dark fantasy and cross-genre novels. It was founded in 1996 by Jim Turner, former editor at Arkham House, and is currently run by his brother Gary and his wife, Geri Turner.

The company has published work by Robert Reed, Michael Bishop, Andy Duncan, Geoffrey A. Landis, Paul Di Filippo, James Patrick Kelly, Lucius Shepard, Charles Stross, Gregory Frost, Nancy Kress, George Alec Effinger, Warren Rochelle, Jeffrey Ford and Howard Waldrop.

Maureen Birnbaum, Barbarian Swordsperson

Maureen Birnbaum, Barbarian Swordsperson is a 1993 anthology by George Alec Effinger, collecting all of his stories (up to 1993) about Maureen "Muffy" Birnbaum, a Jewish American Princess who is magically teleported to various fantasy and science fiction universes, and later recounts the tales to her best friend, "Bitsy" Spiegelman. Originally written on his own initiative, the character proved popular enough for Effinger to gain several requests from authors to have versions of their work visited by Muffy.

In addition to satirizing and spoofing the various themes, the stories had a feminist undertone, as Maureen dealt with the often sexist reactions of the inhabitants of the worlds she met, struggled to find the Martian prince she had fallen in love with, and contrasted her adventures with Bitsy, a housewife with an increasingly unhappy marriage.

The anthology had two editions:

Swan Press trade paper (June 1993, ISBN 1-883722-01-2) cover and interior illustrations by Peggy Ranson.

Guild America/SFBC hardcover (Aug. 1994, ISBN 1-56865-101-5) cover and interior illustrations by Ken Kelly.The hardcover reused the trade paper’s copyright page (i.e. date and illustration credit). The hardcover's jacket has the correct credit, and the correct date was advertised in Locus magazine.

Paul Youll

Paul Youll (born 1965 in Hartlepool, England) is a science fiction and fantasy artist and illustrator. He was born as one of five sons and, at one time, was part of a two-man illustration team with his twin brother, Stephen. He got his start in the genre when his work, done in conjunction with Stephen's, was seen in 1987 at the 45th World Science Fiction Convention in Brighton, England. His first commission, a collaboration with Stephen, was for the cover painting for Emerald Eyes by Daniel Keys Moran that was published by Bantam Books.

After graduating from the Durham New College of Art and Design, Paul spent two more years at Sunderland University. Since 1989, when Stephen moved to America, Paul has worked independently and has produced paintings mainly for Bantam Books. Youll currently resides with his wife Annmarie, in the country village of Esh Winning, on the border of Derwent Side and County Durham. He illustrates primarily for the U.S. softcover (paperback) book market.

Schrödinger's Kitten

"Schrödinger's Kitten" is a 1988 novelette by American writer George Alec Effinger, which won both a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award, as well as the Japanese Seiun Award.

The story utilizes a form of the many worlds hypothesis, and is named after the Schrödinger's cat thought experiment. It first appeared in Omni, and was also featured in the third volume of The New Hugo Winners in 1994.

Stephen Youll

Stephen Youll (born 8 June 1965 in Hartlepool, England) is a science fiction artist. He got his start in the genre when his work, done in conjunction with his twin brother Paul, was seen in 1987 at the 45th World Science Fiction Convention in Brighton, England. His first commission, a collaboration with Paul, was for the cover painting for Emerald Eyes by Daniel Keys Moran that was published by Bantam Books. The brothers continued to work together until Stephen moved to the United States. Painting originally in acrylics, he switched to oils and has produced pieces for such clients as Bantam, Ballantine/Del Rey, Warner and Avon. He has also done work for DC Comics, IBM and for Hamilton Plates.

Youll attended the Durham New College of Art and Design and Sunderland University with his brother. Both graduated with honors and began working as reconstruction artists at Durham Cathedral, before beginning their freelance art careers.

Tales from Jabba's Palace

Tales from Jabba's Palace is an anthology of short stories set in the fictional Star Wars universe. The book was edited by Kevin J. Anderson and released on December 1, 1995.

The Exile Kiss

The Exile Kiss is a cyberpunk science fiction novel by American writer George Alec Effinger, published in 1991. It is the third novel in the three-book Marîd Audran series, following the events of A Fire in the Sun. The title of the novel comes from Coriolanus, by William Shakespeare: "O! a kiss / Long as my exile, sweet as my revenge!" (Act V, scene 3).

Effinger had begun writing a fourth book in the Marîd Audran series, Word of Night, but died before that work was completed. The posthumously-published Budayeen Nights contains the first two chapters of Word of Night along with other stories of Effinger's.

The Last Full Measure (short story)

"The Last Full Measure" is a short story by George Alec Effinger, originally published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine.

Turkey City Writer's Workshop

Turkey City Writer's Workshop is a peer-to-peer, professional science fiction writer's workshop in Texas. Founded in 1973 and still ongoing today, it was consciously modeled after the east coast Milford Writer's Workshop. The workshop "was a cradle of cyberpunk" where many of the practitioners of what would become cyberpunk first met.Founding members of the group included Lisa Tuttle, Howard Waldrop, Steven Utley, and Tom Reamy. The workshop was first held in Grand Prairie, Texas, but soon shifted to Austin when most of the writers involved moved there during the mid-1970s. Bruce Sterling was one of the youngest members of the workshop when he joined it in 1974. Harlan Ellison "discovered" Sterling at Turkey City and arranged for the publication of his first novel. Other writers who have attended Turkey City include Ted Chiang, Paul Di Filippo, Cory Doctorow, Andy Duncan, George Alec Effinger, Mark Finn, Steven Gould, Eileen Gunn, Leigh Kennedy, John Kessel, Rick Klaw, Raph Koster, George R. R. Martin, Maureen McHugh, Paul O. Miles, Chris Nakashima-Brown, Chad Oliver, Lawrence Person, Jessica Reisman, Chris Roberson, Jayme Lynn Blaschke, Lewis Shiner, Lou Antonelli, John Shirley, Jeff VanderMeer, Don Webb, Martha Wells, and Connie Willis.The workshop also compiled "The Turkey City Lexicon," a collection of terms used when discussing recurring SF writing tropes. This guide for writers has been used and adapted by other writers workshops, both within and outside the science fiction genre.

When Gravity Fails

When Gravity Fails is a cyberpunk science fiction novel by America writer George Alec Effinger, published in 1986. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1987 and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1988. The title is taken from "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues", a song by Bob Dylan: "When your gravity fails and negativity don't pull you through".

Taking place in a futuristic Middle-Eastern setting, the series reverses some of the usual expectations of a future world order by painting the West in decline while Muslim countries seem to prosper. The book's other main themes are the effects of drug use and alternate personality technologies, as well as the personal interactions and increasing isolation of a flawed protagonist.

It is the first book in Effinger's Marîd Audran series, named after the protagonist, and was followed by A Fire in the Sun in 1989 and The Exile Kiss in 1991. Effinger started work on a fourth Audran novel, Word of Night, but died before that work was completed. The existing chapters of Word of Night are now available in the posthumously published Budayeen Nights, along with some other Budayeen and non-Budayeen short stories.

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