Geographical Names Board of Canada

The Geographical Names Board of Canada (GNBC) is a national committee with a secretariat in Natural Resources Canada, part of the Government of Canada, which authorizes the names used on official federal government maps of Canada created since 1897. The board consists of 27 members, one from each of the provinces and territories, and others from departments of the Government of Canada. The board also is involved with names of areas in the Antarctic through the Antarctic Treaty.

Structure

The secretariat is provided by Natural Resources Canada. In addition to the provincial and territorial members are members from the following federal government departments: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Canada Post Corporation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Elections Canada, Library and Archives Canada, Department of National Defence, Natural Resources Canada (including Geological Survey of Canada and Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation), Parks Canada, Statistics Canada, and the Translation Bureau. The Chair of the Geographical Names Board of Canada is Connie Wyatt Anderson from The Pas, Manitoba.

See also

External links

Aquila Mountain

Aquila Mountain is a 2,840-metre (9,320-foot) mountain summit located in the Athabasca River valley of Jasper National Park, in the Canadian Rockies of Alberta, Canada. Aquila Mountain was so named on account of eagles in the area, aquila meaning "eagle" in Latin. The mountain's name was officially adopted on March 5, 1935 when approved by the Geographical Names Board of Canada. Precipitation runoff from Aquila Mountain drains into Portal Creek and Astoria River which are both tributaries of the Athabasca River. Aquila Mountain can be seen from the Icefields Parkway, weather permitting.

Black River, Pictou, Nova Scotia

Black River is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in Pictou County. It is on a small river known as the East Branch River John. Black River is also the name of one of two rivers in the area. One has its source near Scotsburn and is a tributary of the East Branch River John. The other is a tributary of the West Branch River John.

Cinquefoil Mountain

Cinquefoil Mountain is a 2,256 m (7,402 ft) mountain summit located in the Athabasca River valley of Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the Jacques Range of the Canadian Rockies. Cinquefoil Mountain was named in 1916 by Morrison P. Bridgland on account of cinquefoil in the area. Bridgland (1878-1948) was a Dominion Land Surveyor who named many peaks in Jasper Park and the Canadian Rockies. The mountain's name was officially adopted in 1928 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Cone Mountain

Cone Mountain is a summit in the Canadian Rockies of Alberta, Canada. It is the southernmost peak in the Sundance Range.

Cone Mountain was so named in 1915 on account of its shape. The mountain's name became official in 1924 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Deadman's Island (Vancouver)

Deadman Island is a 3.8 ha island to the south of Stanley Park in Coal Harbour in Vancouver, British Columbia. The indigenous Squamish name is "skwtsa7s", meaning simply "island." Officially designated "Deadman Island" by the Geographical Names Board of Canada in 1937, it is commonly referred to as Deadman's Island. It has been a battle site, a native tree-burial cemetery, smallpox and squatter settlement in its long history. Today it is the site of Vancouver's Naval Reserve Division, HMCS Discovery. While the island is DND Property that is leased to the City of Vancouver it is subject to land title claims of the Musqueam Nation.

Dragon Peak

Dragon Peak is a 2,880 metres (9,450 ft) mountain summit located in the Athabasca River valley of Jasper National Park, in the Canadian Rockies of Alberta, Canada. Situated southeast of Mount Christie and Brussels Peak, Dragon Peak can be seen from the Icefields Parkway. The first ascent of the mountain was made in 1979 by D. Waterman. Dragon Peak was named in 1921 by Arthur O. Wheeler on account of a dragon-shaped rock formation. The mountain's name was officially adopted in 1935 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Dungeon Peak

Dungeon Peak is a 3,129 meter mountain summit located on the shared border of Jasper National Park in Alberta, and Mount Robson Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada. Dungeon Peak is part of The Ramparts in the Tonquin Valley. The descriptive name was applied in 1916 by Morrison P. Bridgland (1878-1948), a Dominion Land Surveyor who named many peaks in Jasper Park and the Canadian Rockies. The mountain's name was made official in 1935 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

GNB

GNB may refer to:

Alpes–Isère Airport, near Grenoble, France

G. N. Balasubramaniam, Indian singer

Geographical Names Board of Canada

Geographical Names Board of New South Wales

Good News Bible

Gaussian naive Bayes, in statistics

Venezuelan National Guard (Spanish: Guardia Nacional Bolivariano)

GNB, a fictional television network on the American TV show Less Than Perfect

Goliath National Bank, a fictional bank in the American TV sitcom How I Met Your Mother

GeoBase (geospatial data)

GeoBase is a federal, provincial and territorial government initiative that is overseen by the Canadian Council on Geomatics (CCOG). It is undertaken to ensure the provision of, and access to, a common, up-to-date and maintained base of quality geospatial data for Canada. Through the GeoBase, users with an interest in geomatics have access to quality geospatial information at no cost and with unrestricted use.

Geographical Names Board

Geographical Names Board may refer to:

Geographic names board, an official body established by a government to decide on official names for geographical areas and features

Geographical Names Board of Canada

Geographical Names Board of New South Wales

Hatchet Lake, Nova Scotia

Hatchet Lake, Nova Scotia could be one of the following :

Hatchet Lake a community in the Halifax Regional Municipality at 44°34′8″N 63°43′30″WThere 3 lakes in the Halifax Regional Municipality that are called Hatchet Lake:

Hatchet Lake at 44°33′49″N 63°43′16″W

Hatchet Lake at 44°50′46″N 62°49′12″W

Hatchet Lake Pughole at 44°50′52″N 62°49′25″W

Geographical Names Board of Canada

Explore HRM

Nova Scotia Placenames

Manitoba memorial lakes

In 1945 the Geographical Names Board of Canada began a program to name previously unofficially named features after casualties from all three branches of the Canadian armed forces. With around 100,000 lakes - most without names - Manitoba has been an enthusiastic adopter of the program. In 1995 the project to commemorate the 4,000 Manitoba casualties from the Second World War by naming lakes, islands and bays after them, was completed.

The province has had a full-time toponymist since 1971 to manage the naming of its geography. Locations are researched to ensure that names with long-standing local use take precedence and only then given a commemorative name randomly. Since 1995 the province has been commemorating casualties from World War I, the Korean War, Afghanistan and UN peacekeeping missions.

Maurelle Island

Maurelle Island is an island in British Columbia, Canada. It is part of the Discovery Islands between Vancouver Island and the mainland, between the Strait of Georgia and Johnstone Strait.

Maurelle Island is located northeast of Quadra Island, southeast of Sonora Island, and north of Read Island within Electoral Area C of the Strathcona Regional District. The island is separated from the mainland by Calm Channel, from Quadra Island by Okisollo Channel, from Read Island by Whiterock Passage, and from Sonora Island by a narrow strait called Hole in the Wall. The narrow passage between Quadra Island and Antonio Point, the southern tip of Maurelle Island, is known as Surge Narrows. Tidal currents in the narrows average 7.0 knots (3.6 m/s) at maximum flow.Surge Narrows Provincial Park is located on the southern tip of Maurelle Island.Maurelle Island was given its name in 1903 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada, in honor of the Spanish naval officer Francisco Antonio Mourelle de la Rúa.

Mount Greenock

Mount Greenock is a 2,073 m (6,801 ft) mountain summit located in the Athabasca River valley of Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the De Smet Range of the Canadian Rockies. It was named in 1916 by Morrison P. Bridgland after Greenock, in Scotland. Bridgland (1878-1948) was a Dominion Land Surveyor who named many peaks in Jasper Park and the Canadian Rockies. The mountain's name was officially adopted in 1956 by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources (French: Ministère des Ressources naturelles), operating under the FIP applied title Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), is the ministry of the government of Canada responsible for natural resources, energy, minerals and metals, forests, earth sciences, mapping and remote sensing. It was created in 1995 by amalgamating the now-defunct Departments of Energy, Mines and Resources and Forestry. Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) works to ensure the responsible development of Canada's natural resources, including energy, forests, minerals and metals. NRCan also uses its expertise in earth sciences to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of our landmass and resources. To promote internal collaboration, NRCan has implemented a departmental wide wiki based on MediaWiki. Natural Resources Canada also collaborates with American and Mexican government scientists, along with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, to produce the North American Environmental Atlas, which is used to depict and track environmental issues for a continental perspective.

Under the Canadian constitution, responsibility for natural resources belongs to the provinces, not the federal government. However, the federal government has jurisdiction over off-shore resources, trade and commerce in natural resources, statistics, international relations, and boundaries. The current Minister of Natural Resources is Amarjeet Sohi as of July 18, 2018.

The department is governed by the Resources and Technical Surveys Act, R.S.C., c.R-7 and the Department of Natural Resources Act, S.C. 1994, c. 41.

The department currently has these sectors:

Corporate Management and Services Sector

Earth Sciences Sector

Energy Sector

Innovation and Energy Technology Sector

Minerals and Metals Sector

Science and Policy Integration

Public Affairs and Portfolio Management Sector

Shared Services Office

Geographical Names Board of Canada

Space Weather CanadaNatural Resource of Canada have numerous sub-departments, including:

Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural ResourcesThe following sub-agencies are attached to the department:

Canadian Forest Service

Northern Pipeline Agency Canada

National Energy Board

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Port Royal, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia

Port Royal is a Canadian rural community in Annapolis County, Nova Scotia.It is situated on the north bank of the Annapolis Basin approximately 8 km (5.0 mi) downstream from the discharge point of the Annapolis River and the town of Annapolis Royal.

Predominantly a farming community, Port Royal is also a significant tourist destination in Nova Scotia due to being the location of a historic French colonial settlement, commemorated by Port-Royal National Historic Site, which was established in 1925. A replica of the original settlement was constructed by the Government of Canada in 1939-41.The name Port Royal was officially established for the community by the Geographical Names Board of Canada on March 2, 1950.

Roblin, Manitoba

For the former rural municipality, see Municipality of RoblinRoblin is an unincorporated urban community in the [[Municipality of Roblin] within the Canadian province of Manitoba that held town status prior to January 1, 2015. It is located approximately 400 km northwest of Winnipeg, Manitoba's capital.

In 2010, the Town of Roblin and the former rural municipalities of Hillsburg and Shell River had a total population of 3,284. About 40% of the population is involved in agriculture and other resource-based industries. Services, tourism and the processing of wood and agricultural products largely contribute to the local economy.

Terror Bay

Terror Bay (Inuktitut name: ᐊᒥᑦᕈᖅ Amitruq) is an Arctic waterway in the Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is located in the south western side of King William Island. The entrance to the bay is marked by Fitzjames Island on the west and Irving Islands to the east. The Bay opens to Queen Maud Gulf.

In 2016, Arctic Research Foundation researchers on board the Martin Bergmann announced that they had found the wreck of HMS Terror, one of the ships of John Franklin's lost expedition in Terror Bay, led there by a tip from Inuk crewman Sammy Kogvik, from Gjoa Haven, who reported seeing a mast protruding from the ice in Terror Bay during a hunting trip in 2010.The bay was officially named by the Geographical Names Board of Canada in 1910. The bay was one of a series of landmarks along the waters explored by Terror and the route of Franklin's lost expedition named in honour of HMS Terror and the expedition's other ship HMS Erebus, making the location of the wreck in a bay of the same name a coincidence.

Wallace River (Nova Scotia)

The Wallace River is a river running mostly through Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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