Geographic Names Information System

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded. Each feature receives a permanent, unique feature record identifier, sometimes called the GNIS identifier.[1] The database never removes an entry, "except in cases of obvious duplication."[2]

USGS logo green
The logo of the United States Geological Survey

Name changes

The GNIS accepts proposals for new or changed names for U.S. geographical features. The general public can make proposals at the GNIS web site and can review the justifications and supporters of the proposals.

Other authorities

  • The Bureau of the Census defines Census Designated Places as a subset of locations in the National Geographic Names Database.
  • U.S. Postal Service Publication 28 gives standards for addressing mail. In this publication, the postal service defines two-letter state abbreviations, street identifiers such as boulevard (BLVD) and street (ST), and secondary identifiers such as suite (STE).

See also

References

  1. ^ "US Census County Based TIGER/Line® 2009 Data Dictionary: Entity, Joins, Attributes, and Domains". Archived from the original on 27 June 2014.
  2. ^ Cartographic Users Advisory Council (CUAC) (April 26–27, 2007). 2007 Agency Presentation Minutes. Reston, VA: US Geological Survey. Archived from the original on 11 January 2014.

Further reading

External links

BC Geographical Names

The BC Geographical Names (formerly BC Geographical Names Information System or BCGNIS) is a geographic name web service and database for the Canadian province of British Columbia run by the Base Mapping and Geomatic Services Branch of the Integrated Land Management Bureau. The database contains official names and spellings of towns, mountains, rivers, lakes, and other geographic places. The database often has other useful information, such as the history of geographic names, and their use in history.

Kirkby Glacier

Kirkby Glacier is a glacier, 20 miles (30 km) in length. This glacier drains the central Anare Mountains of Antarctica and flows northwest to the sea 3 miles (5 km) from Cape North, and just north of Arthurson Bluff, northern Victoria Land.

Koettlitz Glacier

Koettlitz Glacier is a large Antarctic glacier lying west of Mount Morning and Mount Discovery in the Royal Society Range, flowing from the vicinity of Mount Cocks northeastward between Brown Peninsula and the mainland into the ice shelf of McMurdo Sound.

It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) which named it for Dr. Reginald Koettlitz, physician and botanist of the expedition.

List of islands of Michigan

The following is a list of islands of Michigan. Michigan has the second longest coastline of any state after Alaska. Being bordered by four of the five Great Lakes—Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior—Michigan also has 64,980 inland lakes and ponds, as well as innumerable rivers, that may contain their own islands included in this list. The majority of the islands are within the Great Lakes. Other islands can also be found within other waterways of the Great Lake system, including Lake St. Clair, St. Clair River, Detroit River, and St. Marys River.

The largest of all the islands is Isle Royale in Lake Superior, which, in addition to its waters and other surrounding islands, is organized as Isle Royale National Park. Isle Royale itself is 206 square miles (530 km2). The most populated island is Grosse Ile with approximately 10,000 residents, located in the Detroit River about 10 miles (16 kilometres) south of Detroit. The majority of Michigan's islands are uninhabited and very small. Some of these otherwise unusable islands have been used for the large number of Michigan's lighthouses to aid in shipping throughout the Great Lakes, while others have been set aside as nature reserves. Many islands in Michigan have the same name, even some that are in the same municipality and body of water, such as Gull, Long, or Round islands.

List of volcanoes in Antarctica

This is a list of volcanoes in Antarctica.

Patuxent Ice Stream

Patuxent Ice Stream (85°15′S 67°45′W) is a broad Antarctic ice stream between the Patuxent Range and Pecora Escarpment in the Pensacola Mountains, draining northwestward to the upper part of Foundation Ice Stream. Mapped by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy (USN) air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for its proximity to the Patuxent Range.

Priddy Glacier

Priddy Glacier is a glacier, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long, on the west side of Esser Hill, flowing northwest to join Hobbs Glacier, on Scott Coast, Victoria Land. Named in 1992 by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Allan R. Priddy of Holmes and Narver, Inc., who experienced one winter above 76 in Greenland and one below 76 at McMurdo Station, as well as several summer seasons in Antarctica from 1969-91. He was construction foreman at four geological field camps and for four summer seasons at South Pole Station, and was a key crew member in the building of both Siple I and Siple II Stations.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Priddy Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Princess Anne Glacier

Princess Anne Glacier (82°59′S 159°20′E) is a glacier in the Queen Elizabeth Range, flowing from the area south of Mount Bonaparte between Cotton and Bartrum Plateaus into Marsh Glacier. Named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1961–62) for Anne, Princess Royal, daughter of Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Princess Anne Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Pryor Glacier

Pryor Glacier (70°5′S 160°10′E) is a glacier flowing northeastward, to the north of Mount Shields and Yermak Point, into Rennick Bay. The feature is about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long and forms a physical separation between Wilson Hills and Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Madison E. Pryor, scientific leader at McMurdo Station (1959) and U.S. Exchange Scientist at the Soviet Mirny Station (1962).

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Pryor Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Shark Fin Glacier

Shark Fin Glacier (78°23′S 162°55′E) is a named in association with the nearby mountain Shark Fin.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Shark Fin Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Sharpend Glacier

Sharpend Glacier (76°52′S 160°56′E) is an alpine glacier, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long, which flows into Alatna Valley from the south end of Staten Island Heights, in the Convoy Range, Victoria Land. Descriptively named from the pointed terminus of this glacier by a New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) field party to the area, 1989-90.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Sharpend Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Shoemaker Glacier

Shoemaker Glacier (73°47′S 164°45′E) is a tributary glacier in the Southern Cross Mountains of Antarctica, flowing east along the south side of Daley Hills to Aviator Glacier, in Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Lieutenant (later Captain) Brian H. Shoemaker, U.S. Navy, helicopter pilot with Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Station, 1967.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Shoemaker Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Simpson Glacier

Simpson Glacier (71°17′S 168°38′E) is a glacier, 6 miles (10 km) long, in the Admiralty Mountains. It flows northward to the coast between Nelson Cliff and Mount Cherry-Garrard where it forms the Simpson Glacier Tongue. The latter feature was named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, after Sir George Simpson, meteorologist of the expedition. The glacier described was mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS), 1960–63,a and was so named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) because (with Fendley Glacier to the east) it nourishes the Simpson Glacier Tongue.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Simpson Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Suess Glacier

Suess Glacier (77°38′S 162°40′E) is a glacier between Canada Glacier and Lacroix Glacier, flowing south into Taylor Valley in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was charted and named by the British Antarctic Expedition under Scott, 1910–13, for Professor Eduard Suess, noted Austrian geologist and paleontologist.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Suess Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Suter Glacier

Suter Glacier (73°31′S 167°10′E) is a short glacier in the Mountaineer Range, Victoria Land, draining southeast into Lady Newnes Bay just south of Spatulate Ridge. Named by New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC) in 1966 for Douglas Suter, senior New Zealand scientist at Hallett Station, 1962-63.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Suter Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Telemeter Glacier

Telemeter Glacier (77°48′S 160°12′E) is a small glacier 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of Fireman Glacier in the west part of Quartermain Mountains, Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name is one of a group in the area associated with surveying applied in 1993 by New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB); telemeter being an instrument used to ascertain ranges and distances.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Telemeter Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Wirdnam Glacier

Wirdnam Glacier (78°25′S 162°2′E) is a glacier which drains the west slopes of the Royal Society Range between Mounts Moxley and Lisicky and flows west into Skelton Glacier. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and air photos, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Squadron Leader K.A.C. Wirdnam, a RAF pilot stationed at McMurdo Station in 1960 as an observer, who also flew missions for U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Wirdnam Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Zenith Glacier

Zenith Glacier (71°52′S 163°45′E) is a glacier which lies 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Johnstone Glacier and drains south from the south end of Lanterman Range, Bowers Mountains. So named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) to northern Victoria Land, 1967–68, because the glacier is an important geological outcrop area with an impressive view from the top (the head of the glacier) of much of the Bowers Mountains.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Zenith Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

Zetland Glacier

Zetland Glacier (78°1′S 163°49′E) is a small hanging glacier on the southern slopes of Mount Alexandra in Denton Hills, Scott Coast. The glacier terminates on the cliffs north of Colleen Lake. The name, applied by New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) in 1994, is taken from an old spelling for the Shetland Islands of Scotland.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Zetland Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

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