Geoff Hunt

Geoffrey Brian ("Geoff") Hunt, AM MBE (born 11 March 1947, in Melbourne, Australia), is a retired Australian squash player who is widely considered to be one of the greatest squash players in history.

He was ranked the World No.1 squash player from 1975 to 1980. He won the World Open title four times. He was the event's inaugural champion, winning the competition on the first four occasions it was held (1976, 1977, 1979 and 1980). He also won the International Amateur Individual Championship three times (1967, 1969, and 1971), and the British Open (which was considered to be the effective world championship event involving both amateurs and professionals before the World Open began) eight times between 1969 and 1981. Hunt won 178 of the 215 tournaments he contested during his career.

Hunt won the Australian Junior Championship in 1963, and he first won the Australian Amateur Men's Championship in 1965.

Hunt was known for having great determination. He ultimately suffered back problems, which curtailed his career.

After retiring as a player, Hunt served as the Head Squash Coach at the Australian Institute of Sport from 1985–2003, where he helped develop a new generation of Australian squash stars. He then worked for 8 years at the Aspire Academy in Doha, Qatar. Following his retirement and move back to Australia, he has continued to coach Qatari professional player Abdulla Mohd Al Tamimi.

In the 1972 New Years Honours Hunt was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE).[1] He became a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the 1982 Australia Day Honours[2] and received the Australian Sports Medal in 2000.[3]

Hunt has been inducted into the World Squash Federation Hall of Fame and the Sport Australia Hall of Fame.

Geoff Hunt
Full nameGeoffrey Brian Hunt
Country Australia
ResidenceCanberra
Born11 March 1947 (age 71)
Melbourne
PlaysRight Handed
Men's Singles
Highest ranking1 (February 1976)
World OpenW (1976, 1977, 1979, 1980)
Last updated on: 20 December 2011.

World Open final appearances

Wins (4)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1976 Mohibullah Khan 7–9, 9–4, 8–10, 9–2, 9–2
1977 Qamar Zaman 9–5, 10–9, 0–9, 9–4
1979 Qamar Zaman 9–2, 9–3, 9–2
1980 Qamar Zaman 9–0, 9–3, 9–3
Runners-up (1)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1981 Jahangir Khan 7–9, 9–1, 9–2, 9–2

British Open final appearances

Wins (8)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1969 Cam Nancarrow 9–5, 9–4, 9–0
1974 Mo Yasin walkover (injury)
1976 Mohibullah Khan 7–9, 9–4, 8–10, 9–2, 9–2
1977 Cam Nancarrow 9–4, 9–4, 8–10, 9–4
1978 Qamar Zaman 7–9, 9–1, 9–1, 9–2
1979 Qamar Zaman 2–9, 9–7, 9–0, 6–9, 9–3
1980 Qamar Zaman 9–3, 9–2, 1–9, 9–1
1981 Jahangir Khan 9–2, 9–7, 5–9, 9–7
Runners-up (2)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1970 Jonah Barrington 9–7, 3–9, 9–4, 9–4
1972 Jonah Barrington 0–9, 9–7, 10–8, 6–9, 9–7

Books

Geoff Hunt on Squash (London: Cassell) 1977.

References

  1. ^ "Geoffrey Brian Hunt". honours.pmc.gov.au. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  2. ^ "Geoffrey Brian Hunt, MBE". honours.pmc.gov.au. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  3. ^ "Geoffrey Brian Hunt, AM, MBE". honours.pmc.gov.au. Retrieved 2019-01-26.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Qamar Zaman
World No. 1
February 1976 - December 1980
Succeeded by
Qamar Zaman
1969 Men's British Open Squash Championship

The 1969 British Open Championship was held at the Abbeydale Park in Sheffield from 21–29 January 1969. Geoff Hunt won the title defeating Cameron Nancarrow in the final. This was the first time that the event took place outside London. Returning after a seven-year absence the 1962 semi-finalist Dardir El Bakary represented New Zealand instead of Egypt.

1970 Men's British Open Squash Championship

The 1970 British Open Championship was held at the Edgbaston Priory Club in Birmingham from 8–13 December 1969. Jonah Barrington won his third title defeating Geoff Hunt in the final.

1972 Men's British Open Squash Championship

The 1972 Benson and Hedges British Open Championship was held at the Edgbaston Priory Club in Birmingham from 28 January - 5 February 1972. Jonah Barrington won his fifth title defeating Geoff Hunt in the final. The event was sponsored for the first time by Benson and Hedges.

1976 Men's British Open Squash Championship

The 1976 Lucas Industries British Open Squash Championship was unique in that it doubled as the men's edition of the 1976 World Open, which serves as the individual world championship for squash players. The event took place in London in England from 31 January to 7 February 1976. Geoff Hunt won his third British Open title, defeating Mohibullah Khan in the final.

Held at Wembley a record prize fund of £10,000 was put forward for this first professional World Open and 38th British Open..

1976 Men's World Open Squash Championship

The 1976 Lucas Industries Men's World Open Squash Championship was the inaugural men's edition of the 1976 World Open, which serves as the individual world championship for squash players. The event took place in London in England from 31 January to 7 February 1976. Geoff Hunt won his first World Open title, defeating Mohibullah Khan in the final.

The championship of 1976 also served as the British Open for that year.

1979 Men's British Open Squash Championship

The 1979 British Open Championships was held at the Wembley Squash Centre in London from 31 March - 8 April 1979. Geoff Hunt won his sixth title defeating Qamar Zaman in a repeat of the 1978 final.

1981 Men's World Open Squash Championship

The 1981 McGuinness Men's World Open Squash Championship is the men's edition of the 1981 World Open, which serves as the individual world championship for squash players. The event took place in Toronto in Canada from 19 November until 28 November 1981. Jahangir Khan won his first World Open title, defeating Geoff Hunt in the final.

British Open Squash Championships

The British Open Squash Championships is the oldest tournament in the game of squash. It is widely considered to be one of the two most prestigious tournaments in the game, alongside the World Open (prior to the establishment of the World Open in the 1970s, the British Open was generally considered to be the de facto world championship of the sport.) The British Open Squash Championships are often referred to as being the "Wimbledon of Squash".

David Evans (squash player)

David Evans (born 24 October 1974, in Pontypool, Wales) is a squash player from Wales. He won the British Open in 2000, beating Paul Price of Australia in the final 15-11, 15-6, 15-10. He reached a career-high world ranking of World No. 3 in February 2001.Evans is 6 ft 3, bringing a height and reach advantage to his game. He only took up the sport seriously at 16 years of age.

Geoff Hunt (marine artist)

Geoff Hunt PPRSMA (born 1948) is a British maritime artist and former President of the Royal Society of Marine Artists.

Hong Kong Open (squash)

The Hong Kong Squash Open is an annual squash tournament held in Hong Kong in November. The tournament has both men and women's sections. The opening sections of the tournament are held at the Hong Kong Squash Centre, while the finals are contested in a glass show court outside the Hong Kong Cultural Centre.

Jim Dear

James Dear (1910–1981) was an English racquets, court tennis, and squash player who effectively won world titles in three different sports during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s.

Jonah Barrington (squash player)

Jonah Barrington (born 29 April 1941) is a retired Irish/English squash player, originally from Morwenstow, Cornwall, England.A Cornish-born Irish squash player, Barrington won the British Open (which was considered to be the effective world championship event before the World Open began) six times between 1967 and 1973, and was known as "Mr. Squash".Barrington attended Headfort School (County Meath, Ireland), Cheltenham College, and spent two years at Trinity College Dublin.

The six-time British champion came from an old Anglo-Irish family. Jonah now coaches Egyptian world no.1 and 2015 British Open champion Mohamed El Shorbagy. One of his ancestors, Sir Jonah Barrington, established an estate in County Limerick called "Glenstal", which was eventually sold in the 1930s to a group of Belgian Benedictine monks who established a boarding school.

In 1982 Barrington co-authored the book Murder in the Squash Court: the Only Way to Win.He has coached Israeli squash player Daniel Poleshchuk.Barrington is the father of professional squash player Joey Barrington.

Karim Darwish

Karim Darwish (Arabic: كريم درويش‎) (born 29 August 1981, in Cairo, Egypt) is a squash player from Egypt.

Official Men's Squash World Ranking

The Official Men's Squash World Ranking is the official world ranking for men's squash. The ranking is to rate the performance level of male professional squash player. It is also a merit-based method used for determining entry and seeding in men's squash tournaments. The rankings are produced monthly. The current world number one is Mohamed El Shorbagy of Egypt.

Qamar Zaman

Qamar Zaman (born April 11, 1952 in Quetta) is a former squash player from Pakistan. He was one of the leading players in the game during the 1970s and 1980s. His biggest triumph was winning the British Open in 1975. He lives in Peshawar.

Qamar won the Pakistan junior squash championship in 1968. On his first trip to the United Kingdom in 1973, he reached the semi-finals of the British Amateur championship. In 1974, he reached the semi-finals of the British Open and won the Australian Amateur championship.

In the 1975 British Open, Qamar beat the defending-champion Geoff Hunt of Australia in the quarter-finals, and went on to win the title beating his fellow Pakistani player Gogi Alauddin in the final 9-7, 9-6, 9-1.

Subsequently, Qamar reached the British Open final on four further occasions. He was runner-up to Hunt in 1978, 1979 and 1980, and to Jahangir Khan in 1984. He was also runner-up at the World Open four times, losing to Hunt in the finals of 1976, 1979 and 1980, and to Jahangir in 1984.

Qatar Classic

The Qatar Classic is an annual international squash tournament that takes place in Doha, Qatar in October or November. The event was re-established in 2001. Between 1992 and 1997, the tournament was formerly known as the Qatar International. The tournament features both men and women, the men's event is part of the PSA World Series and the women's event is part of the WSA World Series.

Simon Parke

Simon Parke (born 10 August 1972 in Oakham, Rutland, United Kingdom) is a professional squash player from England.

Parke won the World Junior Squash Championship title in 1990.

As a professional player, he broke into the world's top-20 in 1991, and the top-10 in 1995. He was then diagnosed with testicular cancer in December 1995, and underwent surgery in January 1996, followed by treatment which included chemotherapy. He returned to the professional squash circuit just four months after his surgery.

Parke was part of the England team that won the 1995 Men's World Team Squash Championships and 1997 Men's World Team Squash Championships. He also won the US Open title in 1999 and won the British National Championships in 1998.

Parke reached a career-high world ranking of World No. 3 (Oct 2000).

Parke currently teaches at Leeds University, predominately teaching the 'improvers' squad who have shown considerable promise of late.

Wael El Hindi

Wael Hatem El-Hendy, (Arabic: وائل الهندى‎) (born June 25, 1980 in Giza) is a professional squash player who represented Egypt. A Professional Squash Association (PSA) member since 1999, Wael El Hindi has long been regarded as one of Egypt's most talented players – first making his mark in the USA in 1998 when he reached the final of the World Junior Championship as a 5/8 seed. Steady progress on the Tour saw the 28-year-old from Giza – who currently divides his time between Egypt and England – reached a career high ranking of World No. 8 in November 2008.

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