General Aviation PJ

The General Aviation PJ was a flying boat produced in the United States in the 1930s as a search-and-rescue aircraft for the Coast Guard. Originally designated FLB (for "Flying Life Boat"), it was a conventional high-wing cantilever monoplane with a flying boat hull and outrigger pontoons mounted on the wings slightly outboard of mid-span. The twin pusher engines were carried in separate nacelles on pylons above the wings. The hull was a monocoque metal structure, and the wing was a wooden structure skinned with plywood. The basic design was based on that of the Fokker F.11, but substantially enlarged (Fokker's American operation was renamed General Aviation after purchase by General Motors in 1930). While not a true amphibian and able to land on dry land, the PJ was equipped with retractable undercarriage that functioned as its own, self-carrying beaching trolley.

Five examples were operated by the US Coast Guard during the 1930s, named Antares, Altair, Acrux, Acamar, and Arcturus (hull numbers FLB-51 through FLB-55). In 1933, Antares underwent a major refit that included a redesign of her engine nacelles, converting these to tractor configuration.

PJ
General Aviation PJ-1 Arcturus in flight off Miami 1934
PJ-1 Arcturus off CGAS Miami in 1934
Role Air-sea rescue aircraft
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer General Aviation
First flight 1933
Primary user United States Coast Guard
Number built 5

Variants

  • PJ-1 - original version with pusher engines (five built)
  • PJ-2 - version with tractor engines (one converted)

Specifications (PJ-1)

General Aviation PJ-1
PJ-1 Altair unloading a patient in a stretcher

General characteristics

  • Crew: Four - two pilots, navigator, and radio operator
  • Length: 53 ft 9 in (16.39 m)
  • Wingspan: 74 ft 2 in (22.61 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 6 in (4.73 m)
  • Wing area: 754 ft2 (70.0 m2)
  • Empty weight: 7,000 lb (3,180 kg)
  • Gross weight: 11,200 lb (5,090 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp, 420 hp (310 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 130 mph (208 km/h)
  • Range: 1,100 miles (1,770 km)
  • Service ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,745 m)

References

  • General Aviation PJ-1/2[1]
  • Bowers, Peter M. United States Navy Aircraft since 1911. Annapolis, Maryland, USA: Naval Institute Press, 1990, p. 495. ISBN 0-87021-792-5.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 417.
  • "For Coast Guard Service". Flight: 844–45. 24 August 1933. Retrieved 2008-04-02.

External links

  • "Flying Lifeboats." Popular Science, December 1937, pp. 56–57, all photos show PJ-1 except for middle aircraft p. 57 an RD-2.
1922 United States Navy aircraft designation system

Until 1962, the United States Navy, the United States Marine Corps and the United States Coast Guard used a system to designate their aircraft that included information about a craft's role and its manufacturer. For a listing of all such designations see List of military aircraft of the United States (naval).

Atlantic Aircraft

Atlantic Aircraft Corporation, also known as Fokker-America and Atlantic-Fokker, was a US subsidiary of the Dutch Fokker Company, responsible for sales and information about Fokker imports, and eventually constructing various Fokker designs.

Douglas Dolphin

The Douglas Dolphin was an amphibious flying boat. While only 58 were built, they served a wide variety of roles: private 'air yacht', airliner, military transport, and search and rescue.

List of Interwar military aircraft

Interwar military aircraft are military aircraft that were developed and used between World War I and World War II, also known as the Golden Age of Aviation.

For the purposes of this list this is defined as aircraft that entered service into any country's military after the armistice on 11 November 1918 and before the Invasion of Poland on 1 September 1939.

Aircraft are listed alphabetically by their country of origin. Civilian aircraft modified for military use are included but those that remained primarily civilian aircraft are not.

List of aircraft (G-Gn)

This is a list of aircraft in alphabetical order beginning with 'G'.

List of pusher aircraft by configuration

A pusher aircraft is a type of aircraft using propellers placed behind the engines and may be classified according to engine/propeller location and drive as well as the lifting surfaces layout (conventional or 3 surface, canard, joined wing, tailless and rotorcraft),

Some aircraft have a Push-pull configuration with both tractor and pusher engines. The list includes these even if the pusher engine is just added to a conventional layout (engines inside the wings or above the wing for example).

List of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft

The following is a list of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft, which includes floatplanes and flying boats, by country of origin.

Seaplanes are any aircraft that has the capability of landing on water while amphibious aircraft are equipped with wheels to alight on land, as well as being able to land on the water. Flying boats rely on the fuselage or hull for buoyancy, while floatplanes rely on external pontoons or floats. Some experimental aircraft used specially designed skis to skim across the water but did not always have a corresponding ability to float.

This list does not include ekranoplans, 'Wing-In-Ground-effect' (WIG), water-skimmers, wingships or similar vehicles reliant on ground effect.

Fokker aircraft
Company designations
pre-1918
Austro-Hungarian
military designations
German military
designations
Company designations
post-1918
Fokker America
United States
military designations
USN/USMC patrol aircraft designations 1923–1962
Patrol
Patrol Bomber
Patrol Torpedo Bomber

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