Gene Schott

Arthur Eugene Schott (July 14, 1913, in Batavia, Ohio – November 16, 1992) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher from 1935 to 1939, primarily for the Cincinnati Reds.

Gene Schott
Pitcher
Born: July 14, 1913
Batavia, Ohio
Died: November 16, 1992 (aged 79)
Sun City Center, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1935, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
June 20, 1939, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
MLB statistics
Record28-41
ERA3.72
Strikeouts192
Teams

External links

1913 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1913 throughout the world.

1935 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1935 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–85, 31½ games behind the Chicago Cubs. The highlight of the season was the first night game in Major League baseball history when the Reds behind the arm of Paul Derringer prevailed over the Philadelphia Phillies 2-1 under the lights at Crosley Field in Cincinnati.

1936 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1936 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 74–80, 18 games behind the New York Giants.

1937 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1937 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 56–98, 40 games behind the New York Giants.

1938 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1938 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 82–68, 6 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1939 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1939 Brooklyn Dodgers started the year with a new manager, Leo Durocher, who became both the team's manager and starting shortstop. They also became the first New York NL team to have a regular radio broadcast, with Red Barber handing the announcers job, and the first team to have a television broadcast (during their August 26 home game doubleheaders against the Reds, both of which WNBT covered for the NBC network). The team finished in third place, showing some improvement over the previous seasons.

1939 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1939 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 45 wins and 106 losses.

1992 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1992 throughout the world.

Batavia, Ohio

Batavia ( bə-TAY-vee-ə) is a village in and the county seat of Clermont County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,509 at the 2010 census.

Cincinnati Reds all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Cincinnati Reds National League franchise (1890–1953, 1958–present), also known previously as the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1882–1889) and Cincinnati Redlegs (1953–1958).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Lee Grissom

Lee Theo Grissom (October 23, 1907 – October 4, 1998) was an American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, Grissom played in Major League Baseball from 1934 to 1941 for the Cincinnati Reds, New York Yankees, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies.

List of Cincinnati Reds Opening Day starting pitchers

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Cincinnati who play in the National League's Central Division. In their history, the franchise also played under the names Cincinnati Red Stockings and Cincinnati Redlegs. They played in the American Association from 1882 through 1889, and have played in the National League since 1890. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor that is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Reds have used 76 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began play as a Major League team in 1882.

The Reds have played in several different home ball parks. They played two seasons in their first home ball park, Bank Street Grounds, and had one win and one loss in Opening Day games there. The team had a record of six wins and ten losses in Opening Day games at League Park, and a record of three wins and seven losses in Opening Day games at the Palace of the Fans. The Reds played in Crosley Field from 1912 through the middle of the 1970 season, and had a record of 27 wins and 31 losses in Opening Day games there. They had an Opening Day record of 19 wins, 11 losses and 1 tie from 1971 through 2002 at Riverfront Stadium, and they have a record of three wins and six losses in Opening Day games at their current home ball park, the Great American Ball Park. That gives the Reds an overall Opening Day record of 59 wins, 66 losses and one tie at home. They have a record of three wins and one loss in Opening Day games on the road.Mario Soto holds the Reds' record for most Opening Day starts, with six. Tony Mullane, Pete Donohue and Aaron Harang have each made five Opening Day starts for the Reds. José Rijo and Johnny Cueto have each made four Opening Day starts for Cincinnati, while Ewell Blackwell, Tom Browning, Paul Derringer, Art Fromme, Si Johnson, Gary Nolan, Jim O'Toole, Tom Seaver, Bucky Walters and Will White each made three such starts for the Reds. Harang was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher every season from 2006–2010. Among the Reds' Opening Day starting pitchers, Seaver and Eppa Rixey have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.The Reds have won the World Series championship five times, in 1919, 1940, 1975, 1976 and 1990. Dutch Ruether was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher in 1919, Derringer in 1940, Don Gullett in 1975, Nolan in 1976 and Browning in 1990. The Reds won all five Opening Day games in seasons in which they won the World Series. In addition, prior to the existence of the modern World Series, the Reds won the American Association championship in 1882. White was their Opening Day starting pitcher that season, the franchise's first. Jack Billingham started one of the most famous Opening Day games in Reds history on April 4, 1974 against the Atlanta Braves. In that game, Billingham surrendered Hank Aaron's 714th career home run, which tied Babe Ruth's all time home run record.

List of Major League Baseball players (Sa–Se)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active.

Los Angeles Dodgers all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of the end of the 2018 season.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Los Angeles Dodgers National League franchise (1958–present), and for the Brooklyn-based teams known as the Atlantics (1884), Grays (1885–1887), Bridegrooms (1888–1890, 1896–1898), Grooms (1891–1895), Superbas (1899–1910), Dodgers (1911–1913, 1932–1957) and Robins (1914–1931).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (S)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 187 have had surnames beginning with the letter S. Three of those players are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: shortstop Ryne Sandberg, who played one season for the Phillies before being traded to the Chicago Cubs and converting to second base; right fielder Casey Stengel, who played for the Phillies during the 1920 and 1921 seasons and was inducted as a manager; and third baseman Mike Schmidt, who in 1983 was named the greatest Phillie of all time during the election of Philadelphia's Centennial Team. Schmidt is this list's only Hall of Famer to have the Phillies listed as his primary team, and is one of five members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the others are second baseman Juan Samuel, pitcher Bobby Shantz (inducted as a Philadelphia Athletic), pitcher Chris Short, and pitcher Curt Simmons. Schmidt holds numerous franchise records, including most hits (2,234) and most total bases (4,404), and is the only Phillie on this list to have his number retired.Among the 99 batters in this list, left fielder and pitcher Edgar Smith has the highest batting average, at .750; he hit safely in three of his four career at-bats with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Monk Sherlock (.324 in one season), Jim Shilling (.303 in one season), Tripp Sigman (.326 in two seasons), Lonnie Smith (.321 in four seasons), Chris Snelling (.500 in one season), Bill Sorrell (.365 in one season), John Stearns (.500 in one season), Bobby Stevens (.343 in one season), Kelly Stinnett (.429 in one season), and Joe Sullivan (.324 in three seasons). Schmidt leads all players on this list, and all Phillies, with 548 home runs and 1,595 runs batted in.Of this list's 90 pitchers, four share the best win–loss record (1–0), in terms of winning percentage: Ben Shields, Wayne Simpson, Paul Stuffel, and Rich Surhoff. Short leads all members of this list in victories (132) and defeats (127), followed closely by Simmons in each category (115–110). Short's 1,585 strikeouts also lead, and he is followed by Curt Schilling's 1,554. The lowest earned run average (ERA) is shared by Surhoff and Jake Smith; each allowed no earned runs during their Phillies careers for an ERA of 0.00. Two other pitchers have ERAs under 2.00: Frank Scanlan (1.64) and Scott Service (1.69).Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. In addition to Edgar Smith's batting notes above, he amassed a 15.43 ERA as a pitcher, striking out two. John Strike was hitless in seven plate appearances as a right fielder while amassing a 1–1 record as a pitcher.

Sammy Ellis

Samuel Joseph Ellis (February 11, 1941 – May 13, 2016) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, California Angels, and Chicago White Sox. Ellis was an MLB All-Star in 1965.

Tom Parrott

Thomas William Parrott (April 10, 1868 – January 1, 1932), nicknamed "Tacky Tom", was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of four seasons (1893–1896) with the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Browns. For his career, he compiled a 39–48 record in 115 appearances, with a 5.33 earned run average and 166 strikeouts.

Parrott was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1868, and died in Dundee, Oregon, at the age of 63. He grew up outside of Sherwood, Oregon. His brother, Walter "Jiggs" Parrott, also played Major League Baseball.

Woodie Fryman

Woodrow Thompson Fryman (April 12, 1940 – February 4, 2011), was an American professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for six teams, across 18 seasons (1966–1983). A two-time National League (NL) All-Star, he helped lead the Detroit Tigers to the 1972 American League Championship Series.

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