Gatorade shower

The Gatorade shower, also known as the Gatorade dunk or the Gatorade bath, is a sports tradition that involves players surreptitiously dumping a cooler full of liquid (most commonly Gatorade mixed with ice) over the head of their coach (or occasionally a high-profile assistant coach, star player, or team owner in professional leagues) following a meaningful win, such as the Super Bowl, World Series or other major sporting event. This includes all levels of play including Little League World Series, high school, college (NCAA) and professional teams (e.g. NBA Finals or Stanley Cup).

Gatorade shower
The coach of a Marine Corps league football team is showered with Gatorade following his team's championship victory

Start of tradition

The tradition began with the New York Giants football team in the mid-1980s. According to several sources, including Jim Burt of the Giants, it began on October 28, 1984, when the Giants beat the Washington Redskins 37–13, and Burt performed the action on Bill Parcells after being angry over the coach's treatment of him that week.[1][2] Burt insisted that Harry Carson dumped the Gatorade on Parcells, because Carson was a favorite and wouldn't get in trouble.[3] Former Chicago Bears defensive tackle Dan Hampton claims he invented the shower, also in 1984, when the Bears dunked Mike Ditka upon clinching the NFC Central – but that took place a month later in November.[3][4] The phenomenon gained national attention in the 1986 Giants season. Parcells was doused after 17 victories that season, culminating with Super Bowl XXI.[5][6]

Notable examples

Boston Celtics coach Doc Rivers was reported to be the first NBA coach to receive a Gatorade shower when his team won the 2008 NBA Finals.[7] Paul Pierce dumped a cooler of red Gatorade over Rivers as the Celtics closed out Game 6 to clinch their first NBA title in 22 years. Then-Los Angeles Lakers coach Phil Jackson is the only NBA head coach to receive a Gatorade shower twice, as the Lakers won back-to-back NBA Finals in 2009 (at Amway Arena in Orlando, Florida) and 2010. Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle likewise received the honors when Mavericks celebrated their first NBA championship in 2011. Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra received the same treatment from Udonis Haslem when the Heat won the 2012 NBA Finals at the American Airlines Arena in 2012.

George Allen, coach of the Long Beach State football team and a former Hall of Fame NFL head coach, was doused with ice water from a Gatorade bucket as his team celebrated its victory over the University of Nevada on November 17, 1990. Allen became ill shortly afterward and died of ventricular fibrillation six weeks later.

Kentucky Wildcats coach Guy Morriss is one of few coaches ever to receive a Gatorade shower and lose a game. This occurred on November 9, 2002, during the Bluegrass Miracle, when LSU defeated Kentucky. Coach Morriss was showered immediately before Marcus Randall threw a Hail Mary pass to Devery Henderson to win on the final play of the game. On November 24, 2018, LSU coach Ed Orgeron received a gatorade shower after an apparent LSU game ending interception. Texas A&M eventually beat LSU 74-72 in 7 overtimes.

Many baseball players give a teammate who has just hit a walk-off home run, or a pitcher who has thrown a no-hitter, a Gatorade shower while they are giving a post-game interview on the field. Salvador Pérez of the Kansas City Royals is known for giving a Gatorade shower to teammates after every home win and notable away wins.[8][9][10] Other times, baseball players receive a cream pie to the face in lieu of a Gatorade shower.

The Australian NRL rugby league club Melbourne Storm's players have given their coach, Craig Bellamy, a Gatorade shower every time they have won the premiership under him, including in 2007,[11] 2009[12] and 2012.[13]

In the AFL, players are customarily given a shower if they win in their first game with their club.

In cricket the Australian cricket team players gave their coach Darren Lehmann a Gatorade shower on two occasions, during post celebrations after his team won the 2013-14 Ashes series and during a post match interview after the 2015 Cricket World Cup Final.

In 2016, the coach of Brazilian team SE Palmeiras received a Gatorade Shower during his first interview after receiving the 2016 Brasileirão title, also was the first time known that someone received a Gatorade shower in first division of Brazilian soccer [14] ,the team did again after 2018 title.

Variations

Many teams do not use Gatorade but instead use water or another substitute; for example, the Florida State Seminoles use Powerade, due to their sponsorship agreement with Powerade manufacturer The Coca-Cola Company and Gatorade's affiliation with rival University of Florida. After Michigan State University's win over Penn State in 2010, Spartan players dumped a Gatorade bucket filled with green and white confetti on head coach Mark Dantonio. This was done because of the cold temperature and Dantonio's heart condition.

The tradition has become a mainstay of the Super Bowl; so much so that numerous gambling websites have established various 'prop bets' on situations during the game.

As the tradition has evolved, not all showers are reserved for championship games. Gatorade showers have occurred after key victories that were not championship games, after the defeat of a rival, after the snapping of a losing streak, or after the snapping of an opponent's winning streak.

Generally, it happens during an interview. Sometimes, the "victim" is the journalist. Another variation is shaving cream on the face, with a towel.

Tradition documented

In 2005, ESPN sports business writer Darren Rovell published a book entitled First in Thirst: How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon, in which he documented, among other things, the story behind the Gatorade dunking phenomenon.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Borden, Sam (21 January 2012), A Splashy Tradition, Gatorade-Style, The New York Times, retrieved 23 January 2012
  2. ^ 1984 Giants dunk on YouTube, accessed November 14, 2016
  3. ^ a b c Rovell, Darren (2006). First in thirst: how Gatorade turned the science of sweat into a cultural phenomenon. AMACOM Books. pp. 77–91.
  4. ^ NFLFilms 1984 Chicago Bears Season Highlights (Television production). NFL Films.
  5. ^ "Did the New York Giants originate the Gatorade shower?". Los Angeles Times. September 14, 2011. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  6. ^ Rovell, Darren. "How the dunk was born". ESPN. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  7. ^ Stein, Marc (18 June 2008). "Three Party triumph: KG leads, Allen scorches and Pierce takes MVP". ESPN.com. Retrieved 10 March 2012.
  8. ^ Smith, DeAnn; Fanning, Brad. "Royals catcher Salvy Perez's post-game celebrations make big splash". kctv5.com. KCTV. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  9. ^ Rittman, Emily; Pimentel, Donovan. "Perez's Gatorade baths are keeping one dry cleaner busy". kctv5.com. KCTV. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  10. ^ Torres, Maria. "Four years of the Salvy Splash: How one Gatorade bath became part of Royals fan lore". The Kansas City Star.
  11. ^ GIDNEY, JOSH (3 October 2007). "Cross's night of triumph". batemansbaypost.com.au.
  12. ^ "Bellamy - I have got my satisfaction". heraldsun.com.au.
  13. ^ "WIZ: Bellamy NRL's master coach". theroar.com.au. 1 October 2012.
  14. ^ "Esporte Interativo". www.facebook.com.

External sources

1986 New York Giants season

The 1986 New York Giants season was the franchise's 62nd season in the National Football League. The New York Giants, who play in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL), won their fifth championship—and first Super Bowl—in franchise history during the season. Led by consensus league Most Valuable Player (MVP) linebacker Lawrence Taylor and Super Bowl MVP quarterback Phil Simms, the Giants posted a 14–2 record during the regular season, tied for the best record in the league with the defending Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears and the best in team history. The Giants improved on their 10–6 record from 1985, won their first division championship since the NFL-AFL merger in 1970, and won Super Bowl XXI against the Denver Broncos.

In the playoffs the Giants, who were the top seed in the conference ahead of the Bears, defeated the San Francisco 49ers for the second consecutive year in the playoffs by a score of 49–3. They then disposed of their division rivals, the Washington Redskins, in the NFC Championship Game 17–0. In the Super Bowl, behind Simms' 88% pass completion percentage and their strong defense, the Giants overcame a 10–9 halftime deficit and scored thirty second half points while allowing only ten more and defeated the Broncos 39–20.

After making the playoffs in 1984 and 1985, the Giants entered the 1986 season as one of the favorites to win the Super Bowl. They began the season with 31–28 loss to the Dallas Cowboys, before winning five consecutive games. After losing 17–12 to the Seattle Seahawks in week seven, the Giants won their final nine regular season games. Following the regular season, coach Bill Parcells won the NFL Coach of the Year Award, and eight Giants were named to the Pro Bowl. The Giants' defense, nicknamed the Big Blue Wrecking Crew, finished second in the league in points and yards allowed.The 1986 Giants had been ranked as one of the greatest NFL teams of all time by fans, and members of the media. It was this Giants team that popularized the practice of the "Gatorade shower", which entailed the players dousing members of the coaching staff with Gatorade near the end of a victorious game.

Alamo Bowl

The Alamo Bowl, is a NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision college football bowl game played annually since 1993 in the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Since 2010 it matches the second choice team from the Pac-12 Conference and the second choice team from the Big 12 Conference. Traditionally, the Alamo Bowl has been played in December, although it was played in January following the 2009, 2014, and 2015 seasons.

Since 2007, the game has been sponsored by Valero Energy Corporation and officially known as the Valero Alamo Bowl. Previous sponsors include MasterCard (2002–2005), Sylvania (1999–2001), and Builders Square (1993–1998).

Chandler Jones

Chandler James Jones (born February 27, 1990) is an American football outside linebacker for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). Jones was selected by the New England Patriots with the 21st overall pick of the 2012 NFL Draft. He played college football at Syracuse. He is the younger brother of current UFC Light Heavyweight Champion Jon Jones and of former National Football League (NFL) player Arthur Jones.

Cornerback

A cornerback (CB), also referred to as a corner or defensive halfback in older parlance, is a member of the defensive backfield or secondary in American and Canadian football. Cornerbacks cover receivers most of the time, to defend against offensive plays, i.e create turnovers in best case or (more common) deflect a forward pass or rather make a tackle. Other members of the defensive backfield include the safeties and occasionally linebackers. The cornerback position requires speed, agility, and strength. A cornerback's skillset typically requires proficiency in anticipating the quarterback, backpedaling, executing single and zone coverage, disrupting pass routes, block shedding, and tackling. Cornerbacks are among the fastest players on the field.

Devery Henderson

Devery Vaughn Henderson Jr. (born March 26, 1982) is a former American football wide receiver who spent 9 seasons with the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). The Louisiana-born Henderson played for Louisiana State University (LSU) where he and the Tigers won the 2004 BCS National Championship Game for the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. A few months later, the New Orleans Saints selected Henderson in the second round of the 2004 NFL Draft.

Henderson was part of the Saints' 2009 team that won Super Bowl XLIV against the Indianapolis Colts.

Gatorade

The Gatorade Company, Inc. is an American manufacturer of sports-themed beverage and food products, built around its signature line of sports drinks. Gatorade is currently manufactured by PepsiCo and is distributed in over 80 countries. The beverage was first developed in 1965 by a team of researchers led by Robert Cade. It was originally made for the Gators at the University of Florida to replenish the carbohydrates that the school's student-athletes burned and the combination of water and electrolytes that they lost in sweat during rigorous sports activities.

Originally produced and marketed by Stokely-Van Camp, the Gatorade brand was purchased by the Quaker Oats Company in 1988, which, in turn, was bought by PepsiCo in 2000. As of 2010, Gatorade is PepsiCo’s 4th-largest brand, on the basis of worldwide annual retail sales. It competes with Coca-Cola's Powerade and Vitaminwater brands worldwide, and with Lucozade in the United Kingdom. Within the United States, Gatorade accounts for approximately 75% of market share in the sports drink category.

George Allen (American football coach)

George Herbert Allen (April 29, 1918 – December 31, 1990) was an American football coach in the National Football League and the United States Football League. He was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 1998 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002. He is the father of the Republican politician George Allen who served as Governor and U.S. Senator from Virginia.

Harry Carson

Harry Donald Carson (born November 26, 1953) is a former American football inside linebacker who played his entire professional career for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). Carson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2002 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.

Interception

In ball-playing competitive team sports, an interception or pick is a move by a player involving a pass of the ball—whether by foot or hand, depending on the rules of the sport—in which the ball is intended for a player of the same team but caught by a player of the opposing team, who thereby usually gains possession of the ball for their team. It is commonly seen in football, including American and Canadian football, as well as association football, rugby league, rugby union, Australian rules football and Gaelic football, as well as any sport by which a loose object is passed between players toward a goal.

In basketball, a pick is called a steal.

Jim Burt (American football)

James P. Burt (born June 7, 1959 in Orchard Park, New York) is a former American football player who played for the New York Giants and San Francisco 49ers in the National Football League (NFL). Burt played nose tackle for the Giants team that won Super Bowl XXI and the 49ers team that won Super Bowl XXIV.

Muffed punt

In gridiron football, a muffed punt is defined as "touching of the ball prior to possessing the ball.”

A muffed punt occurs when there is an "uncontrolled touch" of the football by a player on the returning team after it is punted. This can occur when:

The kicking team interferes with the other team's right to catch the punt

A player on the kicking team is struck unaware by the football running down-field to cover the punt.

A player attempts to return the ball, makes contact with it but cannot retain the ball in his hands and it comes loose.

To be a fumble, the receiving team must possess the football, then lose control. In the case of a fumble, the ball is live and can be returned by the team that recovers the ball. In the case of a muffed punt, it is possible for the punting team to recover the ball and continue the drive, but at least in NCAA and NFL rules, they cannot advance the ball on that same play. Rules vary by league about how to handle a muffed punt.

Nonetheless, a muffed punt is a turnover. In the NFL, a muffed punt recovered by the kicking team cannot be challenged by a coach for review because all turnovers are automatically reviewed.

Proposition bet

In gambling, a "proposition bet" (prop bet, prop, novelty, or a side bet) is a bet made regarding the occurrence or non-occurrence during a game (usually a gambling game) of an event not directly affecting the game's final outcome.

Proposition bets in sports are differentiated from the general bets for or against a particular team or regarding the total number of points scored. Traditionally, proposition bets can be made on outcomes such as the number of strikeouts a pitcher will accumulate in a baseball game, whether a non-offensive player will score in an American football game, which team will score the first points of the game, the discipline record of teams in a match, the timing of certain events, the number of specific events per team or in the entire match, realistically any statistically discrete event contained in a match or game could be bet on.

Fixing part of a match for a certain result in a proposition bet is called Spot-fixing.

Punter (football)

A punter (P) in American or Canadian football is a special teams player who receives the snapped ball directly from the line of scrimmage and then punts (kicks) the football to the opposing team so as to limit any field position advantage. This generally happens on a fourth down in American football and a third down in Canadian football. Punters may also occasionally take part in fake punts in those same situations, when they throw or run the football instead of punting.

Salvador Pérez

Salvador Johan Pérez Diaz (born May 10, 1990) is a Venezuelan professional baseball catcher for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is a six-time MLB All-Star, five-time Gold Glove Award winner, and received the World Series Most Valuable Player Award when the Royals won the 2015 World Series over the New York Mets.

Super Bowl XXI

Super Bowl XXI was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New York Giants to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1986 season. The Giants defeated the Broncos by the score of 39–20, winning their first ever Super Bowl, and their first NFL title since 1956. The game was played on January 25, 1987, at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.

This was the Broncos' first Super Bowl appearance since the 1977 season. Led largely through the play of quarterback John Elway and a defense that led the AFC in fewest yards allowed, the Broncos posted an 11–5 regular season record and two narrow playoff victories. The Giants, led by quarterback Phil Simms, running back Joe Morris, and their "Big Blue Wrecking Crew" defense, advanced to their first Super Bowl after posting a 14–2 regular season record and only allowing a combined total of 3 points in their two postseason wins.

The game was tight in the first half, with the Broncos holding a 10–9 halftime lead, the narrowest margin in Super Bowl history. The only score in the second quarter, however, was Giants defensive end George Martin's sack of Elway in the end zone for a safety. This began the Giants run of scoring 26 unanswered points through the third and fourth quarters. The Giants also posted a Super Bowl record 30 points in the second half, and limited the Broncos to only 2 net yards in the third quarter. Simms, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, finished the game with 22 of 25 passes completed for 268 yards and three touchdowns. He also had 25 rushing yards on 3 carries. His 22 out of 25 (88%) completion percentage broke both a Super Bowl and NFL postseason record.

The telecast of the game on CBS was seen by an estimated 87.2 million viewers. This was one of the first times that a very large, national audience saw what is now the traditional Gatorade shower, where players dump a cooler full of liquid over a coach's head following a meaningful win. The practice was first started by Giants players in 1985 but it did not gain much national prominence until this season.

The Longest Yard (2005 film)

The Longest Yard is a 2005 American sports prison comedy film and a remake of the 1974 film of the same name. Adam Sandler plays the protagonist Paul Crewe, a disgraced former professional quarterback for the Pittsburgh Steelers, who is forced to form a team from the prison inmates to play football against their guards.

Burt Reynolds, who played Sandler's role in the original, co-stars as Nate Scarborough, the inmates' coach. Chris Rock plays Crewe's friend, known as Caretaker. The cast includes James Cromwell, Nelly, William Fichtner and several former and current professional athletes such as Terry Crews, Michael Irvin, Brian Bosworth, Bill Romanowski, Bill Goldberg, Bob Sapp, Kevin Nash, Stone Cold Steve Austin, and Dalip "The Great Khali" Singh Rana. The film was produced by MTV Films and Happy Madison Productions and distributed by Paramount Pictures and Columbia Pictures, and was released on May 27, 2005.

The Pez Dispenser

"The Pez Dispenser" is the 31st episode of the sitcom Seinfeld. The episode was the fourteenth episode of the show's third season. It aired on January 15, 1992. The episode was written by Larry David and was directed by Tom Cherones.

Victory dance (sports)

A victory jig or victory dance is a celebration of a victory or success with a dance, shuffle or body movement. It is most commonly used in sports. The term can be used approvingly or abusively. A victory jig can be engaged in as a genuine celebration or as a means to humiliate or taunt an opponent.

Wide receiver

A wide receiver, also referred to as wideouts or simply receivers, is an offensive position in American and Canadian football, and is a key player. They get their name because they are split out "wide" (near the sidelines), farthest away from the rest of the team. Wide receivers are among the fastest players on the field. The wide receiver functions as the pass-catching specialist.

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